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Print Textbooks Lead to Higher Reading Comprehension Than Digital: Study

ipad304Digital textbooks may not be as powerful of learning tools as print textbooks. According to new research from West Chester University professors Heather Ruetschlin Schugar and Jordan T. Schugar, when middle school students were given the same reading assignment in print versus digital, the readers’ comprehension was higher when they read print books than when they read eBooks.

The professors presented their findings at the American Educational Research Association in Philadelphia. The report suggests that enhancements in eBooks such as games and activities actually take away from reading comprehension.

The New York Times has more: “Such flourishes can interrupt the fluency of children’s reading and cause their comprehension to fragment, the authors found. They can also lead children to spend less time reading over all: One study cited by Ms. Smith and the Schugars reported that children spent 43 percent of their e-book engagement time playing games embedded in the e-books rather than reading the text.”

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Rich People Read More Than Poor People in the UK: Booktrust

booktrustSocioeconomic background has a lot to do with how much people read in the UK. According to a new report from Booktrust, which includes survey results from 1,500 adults, the more money you have, the more likely you are to read and vice versa.

Twenty-seven percent of adults from the poorest socio-economic backgrounds revealed that never read books, while only 13 percent of the richest people surveyed admitted to never reading books. In addition, the report found that 62 percent of richest respondents admitted reading daily or weekly, whereas 42 percent of the poorest respondents read that often. Not surprisingly, richer people own twice as many books as poorer people.

Despite discrepancies in access to books and the time spent reading, most of the interview subjects agreed that reading improves their lives. According to the report, 76 percent of survey respondents said that reading improves their lives. Broken down into socioeconomic background, 83 percent of rich adults and  72 percent of poor adults admitted this. (Via The BBC).

Women Still Lag Behind in Book Reviews: VIDA

vidagraphBooks written by women are reviewed on average much less than books written by men, according to the annual VIDA count a report that tracks gender inequality in literary publications.

The organization looked at the number of women whose books were reviewed, as well as the number of female reviewers in 39 literary publications and found that some are more gender balanced than others.  Gender-biased publications included The New York Review of Books which published 212 book reviews written by male reviewers in 2013, and only 52 by female reviewers. In addition, The London Review of Books reviewed 245 books written by men last year and only 72 written by women.

Not every publication was so biased. The Paris Review was very balanced with 47 men and 48 women represented overall. Granta reviewed books by 30 females and 36 males.

Children Read an Average of 40 Minutes a Day

thefamiliesinmediaprojectChildren ages 2-10 are reading an average of 40 minutes per day, spending 29 minutes reading print, 8 minutes reading on computers, and 5 minutes reading on digital platforms, according to a new report from The Joan Ganz Cooney Center called Learning at Home.

For the study, the organization spoke to more than 1500 parents of 2-10 year olds across the country. According to the report, 62 percent of these kids have access to eReaders or tablets, but only 31 percent actually use these devices because their parents want them to read print books.

While reading is definitely an important part of a child’s day, TV dominates. The research revealed that  children spend an average of 42 minutes a day watching educational TV.

54% of eReading Kids Ask to Buy a Print Copy of an eBook They Already Own

dbwChildren’s adoption of eBooks is on the rise, and two-thirds of children 13 and under now report reading digital books, according to a new survey from Digital Book World and PlayCollective’s research arm, PlayScience. Among these young readers that read eBooks, 92 percent of them read a digital book every week.

The report is the final in a three-part study. The first of which came out last January and the second which was published in July 2013. The latest figures reveal that the daily and weekly reading of eBooks among this age group went up with 50 percent of 2-5 year olds that read eBooks do so daily. In addition, 44 percent of older kids that read eBooks do so daily.

According to the report, 48 percent of parents reported that their children have asked to purchase the print edition of an eBook that they have read or already own, with 54 percent requesting the print version of a book that they already own. Kids prefer reading on tablets, acceding to the study. Parents prefer to pay $3.50-9.oo for eBooks, and pay an average of $7.00 on eBooks for their kids.

50% of Americans Cite the Internet as Main Source of News: Pew

pewnewssource

Half of the American public now cites the Internet as its main channel for accessing national and international news, according to Pew Research. While the Internet as a news source grew since 2011, so too did television, and radio. Only newspapers suffered a drop.

This fact comes from an interesting list of end of the year data points about American culture  that Pew Research has put together. Among the news items, in 2013, for the first time ever, the majority of American adults owns a smartphone.

We are also living in an era in which the public widely distrusts the federal government. Here is more from the report: “For the first time, a majority of the public (53%) says that the federal government threatens their personal rights and freedoms.”

 

90% of Americans Said Library Closures Would Hurt Their Community: Pew Digital Library Report

pewNinety percent of Americans aged 16 and older said that if their local public library closed that it would impact their community, and 63 percent said that it would have a major impact.

These Americans say that libraries play an important role in their communities. In fact, ninety-five percent of these citizens said that the materials and resources available at public libraries are important in giving anyone the chance to succeed. In addition, 95 percent of those surveyed said that public libraries promote literacy and a love of reading. The report also found that majority of people (94 percent) report that the public library improves the quality of life in a community.

While most people love their library, only 34 percent of Americans aged 16 and older think that public libraries have not done a good job at staying up to date with technology. In fact, 55 percent of people said that libraries do not do a good job keeping up with technology.  In addition, more than half (52 percent) of Americans said that people don’t need public libraries as much as they used.

Almost 70% of Readers Will Not Abandon Print Books: Ricoh Study

ricohNearly 70 percent of consumers feel it is unlikely that they’ll give up on printed books by 2016, according to a new report from print company Ricoh and analyst firm IT Strategies with the University of Colorado at Boulder. The main reasons for preferring print are that these consumers like the look and feel of a real book, they don’t have to strain their eyes to read print and they like putting books on the bookshelf.

“The Evolution of the Book Industry: Implications for US Book Manufacturers and Printers”  report also revealed that college students prefer print textbooks to digital textbooks, for reasons of concentration. According to the report, respondents reported that a digital display is too distracting.

The study also claims that 60 percent of eBooks that are downloaded are not actually read. It did not include any metrics about how many print books are purchased and not read.

Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy: Study

theroundhouseReading literary fiction can improve empathy, according to a new report from researchers at The New School in New York City.

To conduct the study, the research team which included social psychologist Emanuele Castano and PhD candidate David Kidd, they divided up reading assignments to the participants. Different participants read different genres of books. After the test, they were given tests designed to measure their ability to understand someone else’s thoughts and feelings. Interestingly, there was a significant difference in the responses between literary- and genre-fiction readers and literary fiction readers proved to be more empathetic.

The Scientific American has the story:

When study participants read non-fiction or nothing, their results were unimpressive. When they read excerpts of genre fiction, such as Danielle Steel’s The Sins of the Mother, their test results were dually insignificant. However, when they read literary fiction, such as The Round House by Louise Erdrich, their test results improved markedly—and, by implication, so did their capacity for empathy.

Jobs Involving Intellectual Property Make Up 6% of US GDP: IIPA

iipaJobs involving intellectual property are helping to keep the U.S. economy thriving, according to a new report from the International Intellectual Property Alliance. The research revealed that copyright industries added more than $1 trillion in value to the U.S. economy in a year, and comprised more 6 percent of the total US GDP.

The report examined the economic impact of US industries made up of the creation, production, distribution and exhibition of copyright materials ranging from newspapers and books to TV, music and radio.

The report found that these industries included about 5.4 million jobs for US workers or about 5 percent of all private sector jobs. These jobs paid on average 33 percent more than other jobs, according to the study. In addition, the study also revealed that this is a growing field and grew an aggregate annual rate of 4.7 percent, which is pretty impressive since this is twice the rate of growth for the US economy, according to the report.

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