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Posts Tagged ‘Adriana Lima’

David&Goliath, Adriana Lima Convert Fútbol Fans for Kia

David&Goliath have a new World Cup campaign for Kia featuring Brazilian supermodel Adriana Lima.

Each spot features Adriana Lima slow-motion walking onto the scene to convert new fans to soccer. In “Man Cave” (featured above) for example, some guys are chilling and watching baseball in their garage man cave when Lima shows up, exits her Kia, changes the channel to soccer and replaces all football and baseball memorabilia with soccer stuff. Because this is Adriana Lima, the guys involved just sit wide-eyed instead of complaining about trespassing/stolen property or wondering how exactly she got her hands on their garage door opener, ending with the tagline, “For One Month, Let’s All Be Fútbol Fans.” You can expect similarly ridiculous scenarios on the gridiron (“Football Vs. Fútbol”) and at a sports bar (“Adriana Lima Brings Fútbol to a Sports Bar”). The three spots will launch in both Hispanic media and general market TV on Thursday 6/12, running on all ESPN properties for six weeks. In addition to the broadcast spots, the campaign also includes radio, print, digital banners, point-of-sale, a dedicated FIFA landing page and social media elements. Stick around for “Football Vs. Fútbol” and “Adriana Lima Brings Fútbol to a Sports Bar,” along with credits, after the jump. Read more

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Thursday Odds and Ends

-Publicis Modem London offers some perspective on Facebook’s IPO. link

-If you don’t remember Y&R Chicago’s “Screw*d” work for Craftsman, here’s a case study on the effort (above).

-There are some executive shifts afoot at McCann. link

-A freelance copywriter from San Francisco conjures up memories of Warren Berger‘s CP+P related tome, Hoopla. link

-Philly’s Red Tettemer + Partners has teamed up with Under Armour to help the brand find five college students to join its 2012 “Ultimate Intern” team. link

-Teleflora’s Super Bowl ad starring Adriana Lima might have backfired on Valentine’s Day. link

-A European court has ruled that Facebook and Twitter do not need anti-piracy software. link

-New York post-production boutique Northern Lights launched a sister audio house called SuperExploder.

Kia’s Super Bowl Spot: Models, Metal and Meaty Sandwiches

For the all screenshots I’d seen of a scantily-clad Adriana Lima holding a checkered racing flag, I didn’t have very high expectations for Kia’s Super Bowl spot. But, I was wrong, and David&Goliath definitely delivered on this :90 vacation to a fantasy world driven by the Optima.

What happens when a man is accidentally given access to the sweetest of sweet dreams? He enters a world of super models, Mötley Crüe, giant sandwiches, fire, rhinoceros rodeos, MMA fighting (featuring a cameo from Chuck Lidell) and, of course, fast cars. But, even a perfect world can’t stand in the way of this hero and his significant other. With his Optima, he breaks into his lady’s dream, “rescuing” her from a white horse-riding hunk who looks dull compared to our protagonist. It’s the kind of “manly” everyman story that beer brands somehow continue to fail at telling with each new ad campaign.

Going into the Super Bowl, the majority of hype is undoubtedly surrounding VW’s sequel to last year’s “The Force” and Honda’s homage to Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. After the big game, we hope to see Kia and D&G receive due credit for producing a commercial better than those from their more talked-about competitors. Credits after the jump.

Update: For a play-by-play on how this spot came to life, see D&G copywriter Justin Bajan’s blog post on Adpulp.

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Op-Ed: How to Work in Advertising and Still Enjoy the Super Bowl Party

While we’ve made it an annual tradition to post contributions from industry folks following the Super Bowl, we decided this time to get some thoughts in the days leading up to the game. Throughout this week, we’ll post some commentary from your peers on various Super Bowl-related topics. Hey, since it’s advertising’s big day, too, why not build some hype? First up to bat are Troy Scarlott and Jordan Atlas, SVP/ECDs at Ignited. Take it away, sirs.

With advertising’s big day rapidly approaching, a tremendous amount of discussion is underway about what to expect from the upcoming Super Bowl ads. Most of the talk seems to have fallen around the following topics; Does releasing your spot prior to the big day help to ignite more interest and awareness, or does it only serve to undercut the value that an audience gets from first seeing it on Sunday?

Appearances from GoDaddy, KIA and H&M will help fuel the ongoing debate about whether or not sex sells (our two cents: Sex doesn’t sell. It titillates, for sure, but unless you can recreate that same racy subject matter within the last ten feet of the purchase funnel, you will most likely be left taking a cold shower when it comes to sales. Finally, does the proliferation of :60 commercials signal the return of storytelling? Again, our two cents says that while storytelling at times has been MIA or at least difficult to track down, it never really went away and thus can’t be returning. More time should only be bought if more time is needed to enhance the idea. Put another way, you don’t need more time to tell a good story, you just need a good story.

The focus of most of this discussion is on what the general population will see, feel and ultimately do with the ads shown during the big game. While this is certainly an important group of people, it occurred to us that there is a smaller, but no less significant, segment of our population that tends to go unrepresented on Super Bowl Sunday. We are of course talking about that elusive demographic affectionately known as “The Lone Advertising Professional Stuck at the Super Bowl Party Watching The Ads With a Group of Non-Advertising Professionals.”

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