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Posts Tagged ‘Brianna Lohr’

This Year’s Grammy TV Campaign Is Actually Pretty Great

Right about this time every year, TBWA\Chiat\Day LA debuts its TV spots for the Grammys. And, every year, they’re pretty underwhelming. A few years back, we got a swirly, graphics overload with CGI re-tellings of artists like Eminem’s life story. Last year, we got the hashtag-happy #TheWholeWorldIsListening, which aimed to put viewers into the shoes of stars like Rihanna while trying to convince them that the awards show was still in any way relevant.

This year’s first spot, “Anthem,” looked more like a VH1 commercial than anything else, and it seemed we were in for yet another year of mediocrity. But then, dare we say it, the Grammys and Chiat LA ctually surprised us. The latest spot in the Music Unleashes Us campaign, “Drive” (above), does a fantastic job of convincing viewers that they owe it to the artists who get them through times of sorrow and heartbreak to watch their performances on the Grammys.

From Pink and fun., we move to Macklemore and “Doughnut Shop,” another well-produced and compelling spot filmed outside of Inglewood’s famous Randy’s Donuts. Again, these spots excel at following through with what the campaign promises – portraying the affect that popular music has on the average TV viewer. It both ignites and unleashes, an important sentiment for the Grammys to glom onto as the show still figures out its approach to celebrating an industry that doesn’t know what to do next. One more Katy Perry-tinged spot, and credits, follow after the jump.

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AICP Case Studies Come to Thrilling Conclusion

The AICP Show & Next Awards is extending its entry deadline by one week to March 11. Along with the extension, the final installment of AICP’s “All Art is Advertising” is launching today, the fourth effort from the young creative minds at the VCU Brandcenter.

Past installments of the series touched on a variety of classic works of art that did a lot more than look pretty. From Leonardo’s “Vitruvian Man” fighting Italy’s obesity epidemic to Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel painting revitalizing Catholicism throughout Europe to the Eiffel Tower helping France get its baby-making groove back, we’ve enjoyed the interesting insights from this video series.

This time around, the VCU Brandcenter argues that the first known artwork in history, the neolithic cave paintings, actually served as advertisements for a carnivorous diet. Apparently, cavemen were suffering from a vitamin deficiency due to their reliance on “gathering” in favor of “hunting.” After the cave paintings, nine out of 10 cavemen became self-described (huh?) carnivores. Yet again, advertising saves humanity. Credits after the jump.

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AICP #3: World’s Largest Phallic Symbol Helps France Regain Mojo

Here’s a look at the VCU Brandcenter students’ third “Art is Advertising” case study, which like Da Vinci and Michelangelo before it, supports the AICP’s call for entries launch. In this installment, we have France in 1886, which hadn’t won a war in 200 years, going 0-for-6, and thus earning the title of the least masculine country in the world.

So how does one go about getting its mojo/machismo back? By creating the world’s largest penis, of course. To bring the ladies back to France, the nation called upon Gustave Eiffel to create the most enormous phallic symbol to date, which we’ve of course come to know as the Eiffel Tower. After its erection, 80 percent of the world’s women found Paris to be the most romantic city ever and tourism by both men and women rose 1,000 percent. “That’s what we call an extra large success” as the video so wryly states. Ok, the cleverness has given way to a bit of juvenility, but we don’t mind…yet. View credits after the jump.

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