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Posts Tagged ‘Patrick Craig’

Leo Burnett Makes Nifty Use of ‘Skip Ad’ to Symbolize Ex-Offender Struggles

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Leo Burnett Change has launched a new campaign for the charity Business in the Community, highlighting the difficulties and discrimination ex-offenders face on the job market for the “Ban the Box” project. “Ban the Box,” is a project “calling on UK employers to remove the default criminal-record disclosure tick box from job application forms.” To call attention to this issue, Leo Burnett Chance took an innovative and thought-provoking approach to express the prejudice faced by ex-offenders on the job market.

The interactive spot “Second Chance” (after the jump), directed by Dougal Wilson, puts the viewer in the position of an employer interviewing an ex-offender. Just after the potential employee reveals that he was released from prison six months ago, the “skip ad” button appears. But this isn’t to skip through the rest of the video. The employee in this case is the ad. Leo Burnett equates the hasty discrimination many employers apply to ex-offenders interviewing for a job with viewers hastily pressing the “skip ad” button to get to their desired content. This is where the video gets interactive. If the viewer presses the “skip ad” button he or she is brought back to the video, this time with a more dejected, less articulate ex-offender. This can go on for several clicks of the “skip ad” button until the job applicant becomes fully dejected and says “I’m sorry that you didn’t want to listen. I hope you can find time in the future to give an ex-offender like me a second chance.” If the viewer does not press the skip ad button, the ex-offender becomes more confident and articulate as the video progresses, eventually expressing gratitude to the viewer for listening to him.

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Politicians Say the Darndest Things

Well, it happened, everybody. The “Shit (this kind of person) Says” meme has found its way into an actual viral marketing campaign. Funny, because I always assumed the whole #Occupy hashtag thing would creep into the commercial real estate industry before this happened. A comforting thought: If this steadily growing meme wasn’t quite played out already, then maybe the commercialization of it will be the nail in the viral coffin. Of course, try telling that to the thousands of people around the country busy filming their own videos right now, titled anything from “Shit Dental Assistants Say” to “Shit Koalas Say.” (Admittedly, I did get a kick out of watching “Shit Chicagoans Say” this morning.)

“Shit Politicians Say” comes from LBi for Americans Elect 2012, an organization seeking to put a third, nonpartisan candidate on the presidential ballot in every state. To do this, Americans Elect is asking voters to cast their ballots for a nonpartisan nominee, using its website as a guide to politician’s and business professionals’ stances on controversial issues. Currently, Ron Paul leads all other candidates as the person with the “most tracked” delegate on the issues, which give his popularity with a niche group of Republican voters isn’t too surprising.

To determine if Americans Elect sounds like a reasonable (read: sane) organization, read this New York Times op-ed on the “radical center.” Credits after the jump.

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GE Re-Enters the Sock Loss Debate

Sock Loss: it’s happened to everyone. Sure, you can blow it off as a non-issue, but you have to admit that it gets really, really annoying after a while. That’s why GE, along with agency LBi, created L.O.S.S. or the Laundered and Orphaned Sock Society. Through years of “research,” GE deduced that, rather convenient, the force behind missing socks is laundry equipment. Apparently, socks run away after being “mistreated” by outdated laundry equipment. But, as you can see from the fake televised debate above, most people have yet to come to any agreement about the motivations behind socks’ disappearance. Enter GE’s washers and dryers to save the day.

We posted an earlier video from this campaign, which commenters were irate about because, well, it’s really stupid. So, we warn you, the above video has nearly a 3-minute run time. Consider this before pushing play on YouTube. But, hey, maybe you think this is a cute idea from a company that, in better times, was directly associated with 30 Rock as the sort of company that could poke fun of itself. Now, we have L.O.S.S., which has a website where you can make a flyer for lost socks and learn about the myths associate with sock loss. Credits after the jump.

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