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Posts Tagged ‘Amy Palmer’

Morning Reading List, 10.02.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • It is almost unanimous. You think Les Kinsolving is “A total pain who’s become a joke”

  • Yuille Moves to CBS News

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC’s ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ reached a ratings milestone as the nation’s No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning its 10th consecutive season among total viewers and its 14th straight season among the key demographic adults 25-54.”

  • ABC’s “World News” webcast launched a new page on ABCNEWS.com yesterday.

  • Washington Post reports, “New mom Tracey Neale thought she understood how adopting twins would change her life. She had no clue.”

  • Ken Walsh helps pass the torch from Tony Snow to Dana Perino.

  • A reader weighs in on The New York Times magazine on D.C., calling it “horribly juvenile, amateurish, unprofessional, offensive, way off-base, and so full dumb generalizations, stereotypes and over-simplifications that it was worse than some high school newspaper articles that I’ve read. For about the millionth time: D.C. is NOT New York and New York is not New Orleans and New Orleans is not Austin and…etc., etc. No one can compare cities, and no one can say what is ‘energy’ or what is not, and no one can just bolt into a town and make generalizations that are not true. And, what, for some period of time there were no clubs in D.C. with ‘energy,’ and, poof, all of a sudden there are? Huh? What? What a stupid, dumb article to appear in The New York Times.”

  • A reader weighs on in Kucinich, “Dana Milbank gets the same treatment from the Kucinich camp. this is at the end of his column last week about the event at the press club on aliens: ‘So far, however, the presidential candidates remain, well, alienated.’ Even Kucinich. ‘If you have a serious question, just ask me,; Kucinich spokeswoman Natalie Laber replied when told of the UFO crowd’s hopes for her boss. ‘If not, then just keep your silly comments to yourself.’ (Milbank skewered Kucinich earlier this year over a press event he had to impeach Cheney, I believe).

  • The International Reporting Project (IRP) announced “12 senior editors and producers from across the United States to participate in an intensive 11-day visit to Korea this November as part of the IRP’s annual ‘Gatekeeper Editors’ fellowships. For the full list, click here. IRP also announced the three U.S. journalists awarded International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowships for the fall 2007 program.

  • FishbowlNY has launched the 360 Daily Angle: “a video update of the morning’s news stories.” It’s produced and anchored by NYCTV’s Amy Palmer.

  • MarketWatch reports, “News Corp. Chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch joined heads of state from Turkey, Croatia and Timor-L’Este in condemning violence in Myanmar and called on economic prosperity as a cure for the global turmoil.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Since the public blow-up in July between Sumner Redstone and his daughter Shari over corporate governance and succession issues at their family-controlled entertainment empire, the 84-year-old chairman of Viacom Inc. and CBS Corp. has been on a campaign to convince the world that the feud has blown over.”

  • Dallas Morning News reports, “Belo Corp., owner of The Dallas Morning News and WFAA-TV, announced this morning that it intends to spin off its newspapers and publishing operations into a separate, publicly traded company.”

  • The Guardian reports, “The FT has announced a radical overhaul of the fees users must pay to access its website”

  • WWD.com reports, “Across the category, men’s titles are adapting to a field swept clean of most laddie magazines and men’s shopping titles, where luxury is king, and where reaching the older man is now a desirable proposition. GQ, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and Esquire, which will celebrate its 75th next year, used to be cast as stodgy by the British lad invasion, and both resorted to copying their formula of gross-out humor and barely clothed starlets.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s AOL is poised to capture a bigger share of Internet marketing budgets as its advertising.com unit more than doubles sales to $1.3 billion in four years, a Bear Stearns Cos. analyst said.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “If the speculation is true about you and GQ magazine, you are playing a dangerous game with the media. This time, you apparently crossed the line.”

  • AP reports, “Barnes & Noble.com is getting a new look. Starting Monday, the online site for the superstore chain will have a thoroughly revised home page, including a running scroll of featured releases, and a number of new offerings, including Barnes & Noble Review, a magazine that will be updated daily with reviews and interviews.”

  • The Charlotte Observer reports, “In an address that made the musings of Nostradamus seem rosy by comparison, a respected industry observer warned radio executives Wednesday that their industry would all but evaporate within 20 years.”

  • Washington Post reports, “The industry has tried to get the word out, but many consumers still aren’t getting the message: In a year and a half, millions of television screens could go dark. Not the fancy high-definition TVs or those connected to cable or satellite. But the 70 million sets relying on rooftop or ‘rabbit ears’ antennas will end up showing nothing but snow.”

  • PBS Ombudsman writes, “This was a big week for PBS. On Monday night, the Public Broadcasting Service won 10 ‘Emmy’ Awards in the News and Documentary category, more than any broadcast or cable television network. And the night before, the highly-touted and much-publicized series ‘The War’ by famed documentary filmmaker Ken Burns made its debut on hundreds of PBS-affiliated stations across the country. But did PBS try to make what, by any measure, was a big — and justifiably good — week appear even bigger? The officials here say no, but it looks to me as though they did.”

  • “WHYY’s Bill Marrazzo is America’s best-paid public broadcasting exec. So why does his station give Philadelphians news from Delaware, produce almost no national or local programming, and have employees who are calling for his head?” asks Philadelphia Magazine.

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz asks, “Out-of-Town Critics Too Tough On Thompson?”

  • A reader wonders whether shuster got the idea to ask blackburn…from moveon.org.

  • Media Week reports, “For the fourth consecutive season, Fox’s American Idol is network TV’s highest priced regular series for advertisers. The cost of a 30-second unit for upcoming episodes (which begin in January 2008) is $700,000 for both the Monday and Tuesday installments of the program, according to media buying and network sources.”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports, “When does a television show become an event worth covering on the evening news? Lately, the answer seems to be every week — at least when the show has high ratings expectations and runs on the same network as the newscast.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Juan Williams, whose conversation with Bill O’Reilly on The Radio Factor has been the subject of a week’s worth of cable and print stories, has written about being brought into the fray, and being labeled a ‘happy negro.’ He writes in Time magazine that he was ‘astounded’ to hear O’Reilly was being attacked ‘on the basis of that radio conversation as a ‘racist’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The British Broadcasting Corp. bought travel guidebook company Lonely Planet, gaining a catalogue of 500 travel guides from Antarctica to Zimbabwe to boost holiday coverage on television and the Web and expand outside the U.K.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipsters tell us more executive changes could be in the works at ABC News. ABC NewsOne VP Kate O’Brian is being tasked with a project to review the assignment desk. The desk is currently overseen by VP of news coverage, Mimi Gurbst. What this means for Gurbst is not yet clear. An ABC insider says O’Brian’s review should be finished in a few weeks. The insider says the review had been planned before last week’s hiring of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new #2.”

  • Kansas City Star reports, “The U.S. military needs to get over its fear of the media and open up, a panel of officers told newspaper pundits Friday.”

  • New York Times reports, “As the newspaper industry bemoans falling circulation, major papers around the country have a surprising attitude toward a lot of potential readers: Don’t bother. The big American newspapers sell about 10 percent fewer copies than they did in 2000, and while the migration of readers to the Web is usually blamed for that decline, much of it has been intentional.”

  • AP reports, “They speak English at the BBC, but CBS News veteran Rome Hartman still faced a language barrier when he was hired to create a newscast specifically for American viewers.”

  • The New York Times reports, “During the next year or so, The St. Petersburg Times plans to continue pursuing deeply reported, long-term features about such topics as Florida’s property insurance crisis, complex tax issues, public education at all levels, and wildlife and endangered species. It will balance this slate of stories against all the other bread-and-butter issues it covers everyday for its readers: politics, business, sports, community affairs, culture and more.”

  • NY Post reports, “The appointment of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new No. 2 has roiled staffers who believe the shuffling of the news division’s executive suite was mandated by corporate parent Disney — or more specifically Disney-ABC Television Group President Anne Sweeney, sources said.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co. began a campaign to bolster awareness of NYTimes.com, less than two weeks after it stopped charging readers to access parts of the Web site of its flagship newspaper.”

  • PRNewsire reports, “A new survey finds that 101 million adult Americans now get most of their news from Web sites, while 35 million people rely on TV comedians and eight million individuals turn to blogs for their main source of news.”

  • Justin Fishel, Andy Rooney’s grandson, is FOX News’ new Pentagon producer.

  • Media Week reports, “Hearst Magazines is building a case that, properly done, sweepstakes can be a legitimate way to grow circulation as well as online traffic. In August, Hearst’s Good Housekeeping launched the Pay Off Your Mortgage sweepstakes, which led to such an increase in traffic and sub growth (a challenge for any mature title) that the company is applying the model across its other titles.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Two weeks before the TV network launches, the web component of Fox Business Network is up and running.”

    Jobs

  • Fraud Squad TV is looking for a TV Reporter.

  • International Resources Group is looking for a Writer/Editor and Research Analyst.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Photojournalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Feature Writer/Editor.

  • Avalon Publishing Group is looking for a Guidebook Writer and a Seeking Hiking Guidebook Writer.

  • FierceMarkets, Inc. is looking for a Senior Editor, Telecom & Digital Media

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 06.19.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An ABC News release announced that the network received seven Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio-Television News Directors Association. “ABC News Radio was recognized with six awards and ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ won for best feature reporting.”

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC News has been honored with seven 2007 Edward R. Murrow Awards, more than any other television network. … NBC News was honored with the esteemed Murrow Award for Overall Excellence. In addition, ‘Dateline NBC’ won three awards for Best Feature: Hard News, Best Investigative Reporting, and Best Videography. ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ received two Murrow Awards for Best Newscast and Best Spot Coverage. NBC’s ‘Today’ won one Murrow for Best Writing.”

  • Emma Schwartz is leaving the Legal Times to join U.S. News & World Report as an associate editor.

  • Online Media Daily reports, “In addition to news aggregators like Google and Yahoo, newspapers need to watch out for online competition from a less obvious source — social networks. That’s according to a global study of youth media behavior commissioned by the World Association of Newspapers and performed by research firm D-Code.”

  • Google launched its new policy blog on Monday.

  • NewsBusters looks into Chris Matthews’ comment, “Okay, this country was built on biased reporting.”

  • Andrew Ferguson, senior editor of the conservative Weekly Standard, told Deb Howell of his Al Gore snafu, “I’m mortified about this. It was incredibly stupid.”

  • Wonkette says, “Happy 35th Anniversary, Watergate Burglary!”

  • On Friday’s Corn and Miniter Show, GOP strategist Doug Heye discussed the 2008 campaign and racial politics.

  • Dr. Ralph Hanson is back after finishing the second edition of his book, Mass Communication: Living in a Media World, and now he has the scoop from the National Association of Hispanic Journalists annual conference.

  • FT.com reports, “Winning over a minority of users of MySpace, Facebook and similar websites could hold the key to turning the social networking internet phenomenon into a viable medium for advertisers. Only 8 per cent of internet users regularly upload the video clips, blogs and other content which draws millions to social websites, according to Agency.com, the international digital agency.”

  • Rev. Moon’s Spanish newspaper — Tiempos del Mundo — is closing and will put out its last edition at the end of the month.

  • A reader tells us, “Mark Segraves’ ‘Laptop’ reports were selected as this year’s Robert D.G. Lewis Watchdog Award winner. The judges select one Lewis Award each year an applicant whose entry best exemplifies journalism aimed at protecting the public from abuses by those who would betray the public trust.” Word is he used some of his award money to buy pizza for the entire newsroom.

  • A reader writes in, “Woah.. You mentioned NPR as a Murrow winner, but didn’t note that ABC News Radio took SIX Murrows — six awards that NPR didn’t win. CBS Radio won 3. But high-and-mighty NPR only got ONE.”

  • “The American Society of Business Publications (ASBPE) named 20 magazines as the nation’s best business-to-business publications as part of its 2006-7 Azbee Awards of Excellence competition.” Check out more details here.

  • Free Ride reports, “Silver Spring residents hoping their busy Montgomery County hub will draw National Public Radio away from its current Mount Vernon Square-based headquarters in the District are frustrated with members of the Montgomery County Council who they say are anti-development.”

  • The Employee Benefit Research Institute announced, “Public service announcements featuring ‘Savingsman,’ the high-flying champion of saving and planning for retirement, have received three 2007 Emmy awards from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.”

  • Inside the Pentagon Senior Correspondent Elaine Grossman has won three separate prizes for her Dec. 7, 2006, article, “U.S. Officers in Iraq: Insurgents are Repeatedly Captured And Released.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “the 30-second TV spot is imperiled as never before. Its competition: A dizzying array of digital and Internet options, many of which produce instant results and valuable consumer data, something that TV ads cannot.”

  • AP reports, “ABC News has apologized for mistakenly running a picture of former Washington Mayor Marion Barry when it was promoting a ‘World News’ story about a man suing a dry cleaner for $54 million for losing his pants.”

  • A reader writes in: “At least one sharp-eyed journophile was left speculating about a sighting today at the high-fallutin’ Towers Club at Tyson’s Corner. The woman, who obviously keeps her crib sheet close at hand, recognized three Virginians heading into a private conference room at the Towers. The three were former Virginia governor Chuck Robb; local media powerhouse Nick Arundel (who publishes the Times Community Newspapers); and national security journalist Susan Katz Keating. ‘Must be working on some big media project,’ the woman speculated. Actually, the three were attending a board meeting of the National Museum of Americans at War. All three serve on the board of directors of the forthcoming museum, which will be built in Northern Virginia.”

  • B&C reports, “Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart might be next on the Peacock’s wish list. NBC Universal President/Chief Executive Jeff Zucker and NBC Entertainment/Universal Media Studios Co-Chair Marc Graboff recently wined and dined the satirical news anchor and his agent, James Dixon. According to a network source, Zucker and Graboff didn’t focus on pitching any specific role at the dinner meeting. ‘They just made their interest known in finding a way to do business together if Jon was ever available,’ says the source, who categorized the talks as ‘exploratory.’”

  • NY Daily News reports, “Opie and Anthony returned to XM Satellite Radio Friday with less furor than they sparked when they were suspended 30 days earlier.”

  • New York Post reports, “Tina Brown, basking in the glow of her hot-selling Princess Diana book, appears to be so over the magazine business. … Rather, the 57-year-old editor sounds like she’s leaning toward a possible leap to cyberspace.”

  • MediaBistro introduces the “Fastest Three Minutes In Media, mediabistro.com’s first-ever video newscast — a quick look at the week’s most compelling media stories — featuring Amy Palmer (who can be seen on NYCTV’s NY 360) and shot and edited by Matt Huard.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Both The Wall Street Journal and USA Today are developing glossy magazines for distribution within their traditional newsprint flagships, according to company executives and media buyers familiar with the work.”

  • “The National Press Foundation is pleased to report that we matched our $25,000 Challenge Grant from the Knight, Ford, and Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundations. We raised more than $34,000 from individual donors, of which $28,000 qualified for our match.”

  • New York Times reports, “On Thursday for the first time, Page Six — which no longer runs on the sixth page of the paper, nor on just a single page — occupied three pages.”

  • E&P reports, “The New York Times again topped other newspapers in Web traffic in May, according to Nielsen//NetRatings. It reports that nytimes.com had 12,755,000 unique visitors in May compared to 13,735,000 in April.”

  • AP reports, “Gannett Co., publisher of USA Today, said Monday revenue slid 6 percent in May on continued classified advertising weakness and broadcasting declines.”

  • From the San Francisco Chronicle: “Three books consider the current state of journalism and its future in a landscape dominated by the Internet”

    Jobs

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Business News Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext