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Posts Tagged ‘Dave Davis’

Morning Reading List, 10.02.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • It is almost unanimous. You think Les Kinsolving is “A total pain who’s become a joke”

  • Yuille Moves to CBS News

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC’s ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ reached a ratings milestone as the nation’s No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning its 10th consecutive season among total viewers and its 14th straight season among the key demographic adults 25-54.”

  • ABC’s “World News” webcast launched a new page on ABCNEWS.com yesterday.

  • Washington Post reports, “New mom Tracey Neale thought she understood how adopting twins would change her life. She had no clue.”

  • Ken Walsh helps pass the torch from Tony Snow to Dana Perino.

  • A reader weighs in on The New York Times magazine on D.C., calling it “horribly juvenile, amateurish, unprofessional, offensive, way off-base, and so full dumb generalizations, stereotypes and over-simplifications that it was worse than some high school newspaper articles that I’ve read. For about the millionth time: D.C. is NOT New York and New York is not New Orleans and New Orleans is not Austin and…etc., etc. No one can compare cities, and no one can say what is ‘energy’ or what is not, and no one can just bolt into a town and make generalizations that are not true. And, what, for some period of time there were no clubs in D.C. with ‘energy,’ and, poof, all of a sudden there are? Huh? What? What a stupid, dumb article to appear in The New York Times.”

  • A reader weighs on in Kucinich, “Dana Milbank gets the same treatment from the Kucinich camp. this is at the end of his column last week about the event at the press club on aliens: ‘So far, however, the presidential candidates remain, well, alienated.’ Even Kucinich. ‘If you have a serious question, just ask me,; Kucinich spokeswoman Natalie Laber replied when told of the UFO crowd’s hopes for her boss. ‘If not, then just keep your silly comments to yourself.’ (Milbank skewered Kucinich earlier this year over a press event he had to impeach Cheney, I believe).

  • The International Reporting Project (IRP) announced “12 senior editors and producers from across the United States to participate in an intensive 11-day visit to Korea this November as part of the IRP’s annual ‘Gatekeeper Editors’ fellowships. For the full list, click here. IRP also announced the three U.S. journalists awarded International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowships for the fall 2007 program.

  • FishbowlNY has launched the 360 Daily Angle: “a video update of the morning’s news stories.” It’s produced and anchored by NYCTV’s Amy Palmer.

  • MarketWatch reports, “News Corp. Chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch joined heads of state from Turkey, Croatia and Timor-L’Este in condemning violence in Myanmar and called on economic prosperity as a cure for the global turmoil.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Since the public blow-up in July between Sumner Redstone and his daughter Shari over corporate governance and succession issues at their family-controlled entertainment empire, the 84-year-old chairman of Viacom Inc. and CBS Corp. has been on a campaign to convince the world that the feud has blown over.”

  • Dallas Morning News reports, “Belo Corp., owner of The Dallas Morning News and WFAA-TV, announced this morning that it intends to spin off its newspapers and publishing operations into a separate, publicly traded company.”

  • The Guardian reports, “The FT has announced a radical overhaul of the fees users must pay to access its website”

  • WWD.com reports, “Across the category, men’s titles are adapting to a field swept clean of most laddie magazines and men’s shopping titles, where luxury is king, and where reaching the older man is now a desirable proposition. GQ, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and Esquire, which will celebrate its 75th next year, used to be cast as stodgy by the British lad invasion, and both resorted to copying their formula of gross-out humor and barely clothed starlets.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s AOL is poised to capture a bigger share of Internet marketing budgets as its advertising.com unit more than doubles sales to $1.3 billion in four years, a Bear Stearns Cos. analyst said.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “If the speculation is true about you and GQ magazine, you are playing a dangerous game with the media. This time, you apparently crossed the line.”

  • AP reports, “Barnes & Noble.com is getting a new look. Starting Monday, the online site for the superstore chain will have a thoroughly revised home page, including a running scroll of featured releases, and a number of new offerings, including Barnes & Noble Review, a magazine that will be updated daily with reviews and interviews.”

  • The Charlotte Observer reports, “In an address that made the musings of Nostradamus seem rosy by comparison, a respected industry observer warned radio executives Wednesday that their industry would all but evaporate within 20 years.”

  • Washington Post reports, “The industry has tried to get the word out, but many consumers still aren’t getting the message: In a year and a half, millions of television screens could go dark. Not the fancy high-definition TVs or those connected to cable or satellite. But the 70 million sets relying on rooftop or ‘rabbit ears’ antennas will end up showing nothing but snow.”

  • PBS Ombudsman writes, “This was a big week for PBS. On Monday night, the Public Broadcasting Service won 10 ‘Emmy’ Awards in the News and Documentary category, more than any broadcast or cable television network. And the night before, the highly-touted and much-publicized series ‘The War’ by famed documentary filmmaker Ken Burns made its debut on hundreds of PBS-affiliated stations across the country. But did PBS try to make what, by any measure, was a big — and justifiably good — week appear even bigger? The officials here say no, but it looks to me as though they did.”

  • “WHYY’s Bill Marrazzo is America’s best-paid public broadcasting exec. So why does his station give Philadelphians news from Delaware, produce almost no national or local programming, and have employees who are calling for his head?” asks Philadelphia Magazine.

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz asks, “Out-of-Town Critics Too Tough On Thompson?”

  • A reader wonders whether shuster got the idea to ask blackburn…from moveon.org.

  • Media Week reports, “For the fourth consecutive season, Fox’s American Idol is network TV’s highest priced regular series for advertisers. The cost of a 30-second unit for upcoming episodes (which begin in January 2008) is $700,000 for both the Monday and Tuesday installments of the program, according to media buying and network sources.”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports, “When does a television show become an event worth covering on the evening news? Lately, the answer seems to be every week — at least when the show has high ratings expectations and runs on the same network as the newscast.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Juan Williams, whose conversation with Bill O’Reilly on The Radio Factor has been the subject of a week’s worth of cable and print stories, has written about being brought into the fray, and being labeled a ‘happy negro.’ He writes in Time magazine that he was ‘astounded’ to hear O’Reilly was being attacked ‘on the basis of that radio conversation as a ‘racist’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The British Broadcasting Corp. bought travel guidebook company Lonely Planet, gaining a catalogue of 500 travel guides from Antarctica to Zimbabwe to boost holiday coverage on television and the Web and expand outside the U.K.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipsters tell us more executive changes could be in the works at ABC News. ABC NewsOne VP Kate O’Brian is being tasked with a project to review the assignment desk. The desk is currently overseen by VP of news coverage, Mimi Gurbst. What this means for Gurbst is not yet clear. An ABC insider says O’Brian’s review should be finished in a few weeks. The insider says the review had been planned before last week’s hiring of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new #2.”

  • Kansas City Star reports, “The U.S. military needs to get over its fear of the media and open up, a panel of officers told newspaper pundits Friday.”

  • New York Times reports, “As the newspaper industry bemoans falling circulation, major papers around the country have a surprising attitude toward a lot of potential readers: Don’t bother. The big American newspapers sell about 10 percent fewer copies than they did in 2000, and while the migration of readers to the Web is usually blamed for that decline, much of it has been intentional.”

  • AP reports, “They speak English at the BBC, but CBS News veteran Rome Hartman still faced a language barrier when he was hired to create a newscast specifically for American viewers.”

  • The New York Times reports, “During the next year or so, The St. Petersburg Times plans to continue pursuing deeply reported, long-term features about such topics as Florida’s property insurance crisis, complex tax issues, public education at all levels, and wildlife and endangered species. It will balance this slate of stories against all the other bread-and-butter issues it covers everyday for its readers: politics, business, sports, community affairs, culture and more.”

  • NY Post reports, “The appointment of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new No. 2 has roiled staffers who believe the shuffling of the news division’s executive suite was mandated by corporate parent Disney — or more specifically Disney-ABC Television Group President Anne Sweeney, sources said.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co. began a campaign to bolster awareness of NYTimes.com, less than two weeks after it stopped charging readers to access parts of the Web site of its flagship newspaper.”

  • PRNewsire reports, “A new survey finds that 101 million adult Americans now get most of their news from Web sites, while 35 million people rely on TV comedians and eight million individuals turn to blogs for their main source of news.”

  • Justin Fishel, Andy Rooney’s grandson, is FOX News’ new Pentagon producer.

  • Media Week reports, “Hearst Magazines is building a case that, properly done, sweepstakes can be a legitimate way to grow circulation as well as online traffic. In August, Hearst’s Good Housekeeping launched the Pay Off Your Mortgage sweepstakes, which led to such an increase in traffic and sub growth (a challenge for any mature title) that the company is applying the model across its other titles.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Two weeks before the TV network launches, the web component of Fox Business Network is up and running.”

    Jobs

  • Fraud Squad TV is looking for a TV Reporter.

  • International Resources Group is looking for a Writer/Editor and Research Analyst.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Photojournalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Feature Writer/Editor.

  • Avalon Publishing Group is looking for a Guidebook Writer and a Seeking Hiking Guidebook Writer.

  • FierceMarkets, Inc. is looking for a Senior Editor, Telecom & Digital Media

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 09.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Vitamin Water wins out over Gatorade.

  • We looked into this, “missing? washington post’s technorati supplied ‘who’s blogging’” and discovered the Washington Post did not get rid of the feature. It just wasn’t ready for the new home page launch. The paper tells us the “what blogs are saying” feature will be back in a few weeks.

  • Fox News announced, “FOX News Channel’s Greta Van Susteren will conduct an interview Thursday with former President Bill Clinton. The interview will air on FOX News Channel’s On the Record with Greta Van Susteren from 10-11PM/ET.”

  • Glynnis MacNicol and Rachel Sklar live blog the Dem debate (and “Dems debate Tim Russert’s giant noggin.”)

  • “During a panel discussion at the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference in Washington, D.C., former White House Press Secretaries Ron Nessen, Larry Speakes and Mike McCurry will join Dr. Martha Joynt Kumar, a professor in the Department of Political Science at Towson University, to discuss what their jobs were like and whether they would be harder in today’s climate. Mara Liasson, national political correspondent for NPR, will moderate the discussion. The event will take place at 11:30 a.m., Friday, Oct. 5 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW in the Columbia B room.” For more info, click here.

  • New York Post reports that the witness list for today’s Senate hearing on Google’s proposed $3.1 billion purchase of ad firm DoubleClick “is more notable for who is not testifying than for who is. The five witnesses slated to appear before the panel, including company officials, analysts and consumer privacy experts, are divided between those for and against the deal. Google’s chief legal officer, David Drummond, will appear before the panel, along with his counterpart at rival Microsoft, General Counsel Brad Smith.”

  • Rumormonger reports, “There’s not much surprise left, given the drumbeat of rumors that AOL would be pursuing mass layoffs later this year. But we now hear that layoffs have started at the Internet giant, even earlier than expected, with a number of middle managers getting the chop Tuesday afternoon.”

  • Reuters reports, “The Justice Department is moving ‘as quickly as possible’ in its antitrust review of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s acquisition of XM Satellite Radio Inc, a senior department official said on Tuesday.”

  • B&C reports, “In a major reorganization that affects all of its top executives, ABC News president David Westin Tuesday appointed a single executive to oversee all programs. Dave Davis, formerly general manager of WABC in New York, was named executive vice president responsible for ABC News programs including Good Morning America, World News, 20/20, Primetime, Nightline, This Week with George Stephanopoulos and the overnight broadcasts. Davis will report to Westin.”

  • USA Today reports, “Arianna Huffington’s business plan: start an online news site, fueled by blog reports from her celebrity and influential friends. And have them all work for free, in exchange for using her bully pulpit. Nearly 2 1/2 years and $10 million later, the experiment has nearly paid off. The Huffington Post is the fifth-most-linked-to blog on the Internet, according to
    measurement firm Technorati.”

  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, “Consumers are in control, and advertisers should get used to it. That was a common theme as marketing industry leaders gathered in Manhattan on Monday to ponder how the Internet has turned their world upside down.”

  • Julie Mason, Houston Chronicle’s White House Correspondent, has been added to the regular rotation for Hardball.

  • B&C reports, “The Justice Department agreed to seek Supreme Court review of the Second Circuit court’s smackdown of the Federal Communications Commission’s crackdown on fleeting profanities.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Poynter’s ongoing Eyetrack research project has taught us some important basics, such as: Online audiences focus heavily on headlines, and in some cases almost ignore pictures. But other research tools make me want to challenge — or at least supplement — this finding.”

  • A release announced, “National Journal Group, Washington’s leading publisher of political and policy news and analysis, today announced the lineup for the inaugural edition of National Journal On Air, its new weekly show on XM Satellite Radio’s P.O.T.U.S.’08 channel. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney will headline National Journal’s first show in the featured newsmaker interview with host Linda Douglass. Also scheduled to appear on the show are National Journal political writer Jim Barnes, National Journal White House correspondent Carl Cannon, and Senior Editor of The Hotline, John Mercurio.”

  • The Hill reports, “It’s always preferable to conduct interviews face to face, but hey, if Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) wants to visit via satellite from a barn in New York, who was Fox News to complain? That’s ‘Fox News Sunday’ host Chris Wallace’s take on Clinton’s appearance last weekend on his show.”

  • We have to ask, in light of the Washington Times hiring two new hires on the copy desk, does that mean the paper’s hiring freeze is off?

  • A reader tells us, “You should know that there is an error in the Michel du Cille internal memo from the Washington Post. Contrary to their statement, there is no ‘University of Indiana’. Rather, the appropriate institution to which they refer is ‘Indiana University’… a very important difference.”

  • Featured on Kudlow & Company, Brent Bozell revealed the results of the Business & Media Institute’s yearlong study analyzing how businessmen and women were characterized by ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN and Fox News’ evening newscasts. The results reveal how network news portrays our nation’s corporate leaders — as criminals, crooks, villains and filthy rich big-wigs. The full 18-page study — with audio and video — is available at www.businessandmedia.org.

  • Ad Week’s Mike Shields writes, “Political candidates from both parties are demonstrating a stubborn devotion to traditional media, along with a cautious streak that is holding them back from embracing the Web as an outlet for political ad dollars, according to a group of panelists speaking during a Mixx Conference session” held Tuesday.

  • B to B reports, “DoubleClick announced the launch of DoubleClick Mobile, a new service for mobile advertising. DoubleClick Mobile integrates operational processes for scheduling, targeting, selecting and delivering ads on mobile Web pages with publishers’ existing digital channels.”

  • Multichannel reports, “TV Guide Broadband, the digital video entertainment programming service launched one year ago by TV Guide Network, has signed a new distribution deal with Comcast’s portal site, officials said Tuesday.”

  • Reuters reports, “Steve Case, the founder of the AOL Internet service, is backing a new online payment company that promises to let users transfer funds for free and offer a credit card with sharply lower fees for merchants.”

  • Ad Week reports, “WPP Group joined in a $12 million round of funding for blog and social network tracking service Visible Technologies.”

  • New York Observer reports, “It’s still nearly two months until News Corp. officially closes on Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal’s parent. But there’s growing evidence that at The Journal, the Rupert Murdoch era has already begun. On September 17, the paper announced that it would launch Pursuits, a glossy magazine supplement covering the exploits of the superrich. The press release sent out by The Journal quoted publisher Gordon Crovitz and managing editor Marcus Brauchli — but according to one staffer, the prototype for the new venture had already passed through the hands of Mr. Murdoch, who gave it the green light.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s Fortune and Money business magazines plan to contribute several hours of video news to the company’s CNN Money Web site each day to lure users and advertisers.”

    Jobs

  • E&E Publishing/E&ETV is looking for a Video Producer.

  • Media General is looking for a Senior Multimedia Reporter.

  • The Center for Democracy & Technology is seeking Dynamic Communications Director.

  • The Society For Neuroscience is looking for a Staff Writer/Editor (Print).

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division/writer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext