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Posts Tagged ‘Denise Wills’

Washingtonian Is Looking for ‘New, Talented Writers’

“We’re always looking for new, talented writers,” says Washingtonian‘s features editor Denise Wills.

The magazine is “the region’s top source of information for dining, shopping, entertainment and personalities,” and covers the entire D.C. metropolitan area, including Maryland and Virginia. The pub has a broad scope, but as long as your pitch has a Washington angle, you have a good chance of piquing the editors’ interest.

“We cover a wide range of subjects, but… it either is something that helps you understand Washington better or tells you how to live better here,” said Wills.

Washingtonian editors are hungry for well-reported features about culture, politics, local personalities, Washington institutions and life in the capital region. Editors are also seeking service stories: “We could especially use some more pitches on home design and beauty,” said Wills.

For more info on what to pitch, read How To Pitch: Washingtonian. [subscription required]

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Insider Secrets to Pitching Washingtonian

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Online, Washingtonian says two best areas for writers to break into the magazine are “Spotlight” (snapshot people pieces in about 250 words ) and “Capital Comment” (political gossip, personalities, etc.).

Mediabistro’s Blake Gernstetter delves deeper in an interview with Washingtonian Features Editor Denise Wills and learns that longer profiles and first-person narratives are wanted. On a special note Willis stresses the need for “service” stories on home design and beauty.

Wills remarks, “Those service-driven, more evergreen pieces should be between 500 and 2,000 words. “Sidebar ideas are always helpful,” adds Wills, as are suggestions for art.

Online opportunities are almost nil as most writing online is done in-house.

Above all, Willis says, the local D.C. angle is key.
Lead time: 4-6 months; Pay: &.75 per word.