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Posts Tagged ‘Jared Kushner’

Morning Reading List 04.23.09

Good morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Its day 94 covering the Obama administration and week 12 for us. What we know and what we’re reading this Thursday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

Peter Kaplan, the longest-serving editor of The New York Observer, announced he is resigning from the newspaper effective June 1st. Kaplan joined the newspaper in 1994, after working as a magazine editor, the executive producer of The Charlie Rose show, and as a reporter for NYT.

From NYT: A number of staffers at The Observer said that a push for shorter articles and a desire for cuts in an already small newsroom budget helped Kaplan decide it was time to go. And the NY Post: Jared Kushner is rumored to be trying to unload the salmon-colored weekly.

Fifty-three newsroom employees were laid off at the Chicago Tribune. From the Trib: Editor Gerould Kern said in a letter to staff that cuts are part of a newsroom reorganization that “will focus us more clearly on our core mission” going forward with a newsgathering team of around 430.

TV

Shepard Smith dropped the “F” bomb on FoxNews.com’s Strategy Room yesterday and WebNewser has the clip.

HuffPo’s Danny Shea reports Fox News has filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the Department of Homeland Security seeking the entire report on “right-wing extremist groups” identified as a national security threat.

Do CBS and NBC have plans to team up on a Kabul bureau? NY Observer’s Felix Gillette takes a look here.

ONLINE

Michael Wolff asks Why Do Liberals Still Care About Matt Drudge? “I do not think [Matt] Drudge has disappeared. I think he is dead. Certainly the Drudge Report has been on automatic pilot for several years… Drudge doesn’t count for anything. He’s from another time — a leftover. In fact, his disappearance might just be a mid-life crisis.”

This is astounding- In the last year, people somehow found a way to spend 73% more time on Facebook and other social networking sites. In February, Nielsen found, people used social network sites more than they used Web-based email for the first time ever.

NEWS NOTES

Check out the collection of photographs on the walls of the White House, commentated by John Dickerson on Slate here.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro, Romenesko

JOBS after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 01.13.09

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Good morning Washington.

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We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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It’s A Black Friday For Politicker

Lots of bad news out of Jared Kushner‘s Politicker websites today, we’ve learned.

(See a February 2008 New York Times profile of Politicker)

The drip, drip:

  • Politicker’s two DC staffers — Alex Isenstadt and Eric Pfeiffer — have been let go. Deputy Managing Editor Michael Grass (formerly of the Express, DCist) was also let go.

  • Word is that 70% of staffers are being let go.

  • Only five of Politicker’s state sites will remain — Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New York.

  • The cause? Well, besides the crappy economy and the crappier journalism industry, Politicker is opting to focus on states that have a better chance of bringing in revenue down the road (many state sites didn’t have an ad sales team), and some state sites had dimmer prospects than others. Some staffers expressed a lack of confidence in the publication’s management and leadership, to us.

  • Most of the casualties are getting two weeks severance pay.

  • Remaining editors will get pay cuts.

  • To be fair, we should outline some of Politicker’s accomplishments. Among them: Politicker is a major player in some states, breaking news and driving the political news cycle on occasion. State-level political types love their work. “We did a lot
    with very little,” said one. “Too bad the economy sucks.”

  • Ben Breier, a web producer in Politicker’s New York office, was also let go, as was the other web producer, Karl Stampfl.

    Got more info? You can reach us here.

  • Morning Reading List, 11.12.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

    We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

    Read more

    Morning Reading List, 02.19.08

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    Good morning Washington.

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    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • The Oscars are your favorite awards show.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of the Society for Science & the Public, has named Jonathan Oleisky its new associate publisher.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Readers are super-sensitive to any perceived slight to their favorite candidate — from Page 1 display to photos to the details of graphics. And they want guidance from The Post in issues coverage and editorial endorsements before they vote. Several readers were unhappy that on last Sunday’s front page, Sen. Barack Obama’s Feb. 9 primary victories were played below a story on the Washington Redskins naming Jim Zorn as head coach.”

  • William McGurn on “Press Corps Quagmire

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Now that pending layoffs at the New York Times and Los Angeles Times have made newsroom cutbacks all but unanimous, some managers eager to maximize the feet on the street at their newspapers are wondering if they really need all those editors.”

  • A release announced, “The International Center for Journalists, the Washington-based nonprofit organization, is seeking nominations for the 2008 Knight International Journalism Awards. The Awards recognize international journalists who demonstrate an extraordinary devotion to the craft by upholding the highest journalistic standards despite overwhelming challenges.”

  • Crains New York reports, “On the heels of a 13% plunge in December’s advertising revenue, The New York Times said last week that it would cut 100 newsroom jobs over the course of this year. The paper isn’t the only suffering media business. Radio ad revenue for the New York marketplace took a slide in January, and television insiders predict a low-single-digit ad revenue drop in the first quarter for the local marketplace. Add magazines to the mix: Some are seeing the bottom fall out of their ad page counts.”

  • “Pundit Police Watch News Talkers

  • Stephen Hunter talks about his heart attack.

  • Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson asks, “Are the news media being beastly to Hillary Clinton? Are political reporters and commentators — as Bill Clinton suggested but didn’t quite come out and say in a radio interview Tuesday — basically in the tank for Barack Obama?” In response, Terence Smith writes, “Gene’s answer: no and no. My view: yes and yes.”

  • The New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “Three articles in The Times last month raised an intriguing question: When does fairness demand that a newspaper walk down the middle in a scientific dispute, and when does responsibility demand that it take sides? It is hardly a new question, and The Times, historically, has been slow to declare victors.”

  • A release announced, “The American Society of Newspaper Editors has selected the winners of its annual awards for distinguished writing and photography.” Among the winners are Anne Hull and Dana Priest, The Washington Post for their stories “exposing the deep and widespread problems at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.”

  • Edward Wasserman, the Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University, writes, “Beneath the somber tales of shrinking revenues and staff cuts is an even more somber reality about the news business: The nearly two-century-old marriage between consumer advertising and journalism is on the rocks.”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “Coverage Adds to Clinton’s Steep Climb”

  • The New Yorker reports, “few days before Senator Barack Obama swept the Democratic primaries in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, people across the country, picking up their favorite newspaper, were greeted with the following headline: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Big Part In Obama’s Young Life. In any event, that’s what some readers thought they read. On second glance, they realized their mistake. The headline actually said this: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Bit Part In Obama’s Young Life. Maybe, though, the mistake wasn’t just the readers’, especially the bleary-eyed among them who hadn’t yet had their morning coffee. After all, it wasn’t exactly news that ‘drugs’ had played a part (and only a ‘bit part’ at that) in the adolescence of the junior senator from Illinois. That particular factoid had been on the public record for more than twelve years. And if it wasn’t news, what was it doing on the front page of the New York Times?”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has acquired $60 million worth of shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. over the past three weeks as part of its push to grow its education business.”

  • Market Watch reports, “A pair of hedge funds seeking representation on the board of directors of New York Times Co. disclosed on Thursday that they have raised their stake in the media company above 10%. Firebrand Partners and Harbinger Capital Partners reported holding 15.1 million New York Times shares, or a 10.54% stake, after a Harbinger fund bought 441,100 Class A shares for $17.62 a share on Tuesday. The funds had previously reported holding 14.25 million shares for a 9.96% stake.”

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    TV

  • Do we have too many pundits? Paul Farhi looks into it.

  • A CNN release announced, “This Week in Politics will move to the 6 p.m. (ET) time slot on Saturdays beginning this weekend. The one-hour program, anchored by Tom Foreman, previously aired at 7 p.m. on Saturdays.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Some Shuster Defense on Rival Networks”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “It’s official: The strike drove writers nuts. No, not TV and film writers. Journalists. Fourteen weeks of covering bitter trench warfare between the Writers Guild of America and the studios, and the ink-stained wretches are feeling wretched. It’s not just that covering a complex, polarizing news story for more than three months left them fried. The worst part has been the blowback. And we don’t mean from the studios and networks, either. No, friends, it’s the ugliest kind of warfare: writer on writer.”

  • TVNewser reported this weekend, “This morning on Fox & Friends Weekend, an entirely new group of anchors graced the FNC screen. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris greeted viewers at 7amET. Johnny Dollar has some clips of the trio’s first day.”

  • From Playbook: “ABC’s Ann Compton e-mails that when President Bush landed today in rural Arusha, Tanzania, in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, he was greeted by Masai tribal dancers, hundreds of cheering Africans lining the — and three people, standing apart, waving OBAMA signs. ‘Not certain whether Bush saw them,’ Ann writes. ‘Just bought Mike Allen a ZEBRA — bringing it home on press plane. Really!’”

  • Washington Post reports, “In Washington, politics and the press always manage to inject themselves into the proceedings, even at a music awards show honoring the best and brightest on the local music scene. So at a long-standing music awards ceremony like the Wammies, you pretty much expect that at some point, CBS newsman Bob Schieffer is going to take to the stage. After all, there is no moment more quintessential D.C., more inside-the-Beltway, than the sight of Schieffer — who won a Spotlight Award last night — rocking at the mike with the local band Honky Tonk Confidential, speak-singing with a country-western twang a little ditty called ‘TV Anchorman.’ He also extolled the wonders of the ‘American dream’ — and promised that after the presidential inauguration next year he’ll forswear TV life for a full-time music career.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “ABC newsman Bob Woodruff’s long recovery from a brain injury suffered in an IED attack in 2006 in Iraq is turning a new page. Literally. He tells us that in the upcoming paperback version of his hit book, In an Instant, his kids will write of how they dealt with their father’s injury, coma, and recovery.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington Post reports,Barry Schuler moved to Washington from Silicon Valley to join AOL during its golden days, one of the many top technology professionals the Internet giant recruited to the region. But when the former chief executive left in 2003, he returned to California to become an investor and start a technology company, following other executives who have drifted away from the region. … Departures like Schuler’s are one reason Washington’s technology industry is still struggling to mature a decade after Dulles-based AOL became a magnet for talent.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Media Work Force Sinks to 15-Year Low”

  • The Guardian reports, “Media companies including the BBC, Channel 4, Google, Yahoo and social-networking site Bebo have signed up to a new code of conduct … designed to give parents more information about the suitability for children of audiovisual content available on the internet and mobile phones.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “With recession talk in the air, marketers are scrutinizing their spending. But old, reliable tricks such as counting on coupons to goose sales might not work this time around. Luckily, cheaper options abound in emerging media such as mobile, e-mail and search.”

  • Variety reports, “Amid all the recent headlines about tie-ups and acquisitions involving Yahoo, Microsoft, Google and Facebook, one player continues to look more like a perpetual bridesmaid than bride. Few could dispute that AOL, the onetime buyer of Time Warner, has become a burr under its parent company’s saddle financially. Q4 2007 results released Feb. 6 showed an array of less-than-scintillating numbers. Division revenue slipped below 10% of the conglom’s total for the first quarter since 2000. Fiscal-year operating profit was just 14% of the total. Display ad revenue gained just 3% for the quarter, to $252 million, and paid search rose only 1%.”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “The Right Strengthens its Hold on McCain, the Media Refuse to Notice”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Reed Elsevier, the Anglo-Dutch media group, is drawing up plans to axe more than 1,000 jobs as part of a continuing efficiency drive, The Sunday Telegraph has learned. The company, which owns the LexisNexis information service and the medical journal, The Lancet, is understood to be preparing to cut the jobs over the next couple of years as it centralises functions such as procurement, human resources and IT across the group. Analysts expect the job cuts — the majority of which will take place outside Britain — to contribute to a restructuring that will shed as much as £100m from Reed’s annual costs bill. It is unclear whether the cuts will be acknowledged formally in its annual results announcement on Wednesday.”

  • Kiplinger.com’s Business Resource Center launched a new Politics blog. Check it out here.

  • The Telegraph reports, “AOL, the American internet company, is attempting to piece together a deal with Yahoo! designed to help the Silicon Valley-based search engine evade the clutches of Microsoft, the world’s biggest software group”

  • New York Times reports, “In the middle of a media-saturated political season, Jared Kushner, publisher of The New York Observer, has been quietly nurturing an ambitious political journalism venture. The plan is to pull together 50 Web sites, one for each state, into a political hub called Politicker.com. Each site will serve as an intensely local source for political articles, speculation and scandal, Mr. Kushner said.”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “Illinois Shooting Tragedy Pushes Election Off The Top, Mostly”

  • Chris Cillizza admits, “The Fix is a non-voter — for a few reasons”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Washington Monthly may team up with Common Cause.

  • “In the press, Hillary has been trapped by her own story, whereas Obama has been freed by his,” writes John Heilemann.

  • New York Post reports, “While magazine circulation inched up an average of just 1.1 percent in the second half of 2007, a few magazines with innovative approaches and partnerships managed to beat the odds.”

  • The Feed reports, “Time magazine senior political analyst Mark Halperin joined a small, yet growing club this week, when he issued an apology for saying John Edwards considered Barack Obama ‘kind of a pussy’ on a satellite radio talk show.”

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    RADIO

  • FMQB reports, “Clear Channel Communications released its 2007 and Q4 fiscal results, with the company’s quarterly profit up 51.7 percent. Earnings in the quarter jumped from $211 in 2006 to $320 million in 2007. Revenue was up four percent to $1.84 billion. For the entire year, revenue was up six percent to $6.82 billion. Net income increased by 37 percent to $938.5 million.”

  • Canadian Business reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. spent roughly $1.2 million in 2007 to lobby for approval of its proposed $5 billion acquisition by rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., among other issues. The satellite radio operator spent $580,000 in the second half of 2007 to lobby Congress and the Department of Justice about the pending merger, according to a disclosure form posted online Tuesday by the Senate’s public records office.”

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    BOOKS

  • Newsweek asks, “What to make of ‘Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks From the Wild Web’? The new book, edited by Sarah Boxer, the New York Times’s first (now former) ‘Web critic,’ endeavors to compile an anthology of the best posts from the best Web logs. ‘W,’ you might ask, ‘TF?’ To what end this dead-tree blogroll? Is this a sincere attempt to explain the blogging phenomenon-which some estimate is, in its current form, more than 15 years old to off-the-grid grandmas across America? Or is this compilation a cynical ploy to cash in on free content?”

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Television Producer-Writer.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for a Financial Services Reporter.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Web Producer and a Web Editor.

  • Summit Business Media is looking for a DC Reporter for Credit Union Times Magazine.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

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