TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘John Kelly’

Morning Reading List, 11.09.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Pricey shampoos are your thing.

  • Can you answer this week’s CQ Political Trivia?

  • The Associated Press reports, “Newspaper publisher Lee Enterprises Inc. said Thursday its fourth-quarter profit nearly doubled versus a year ago with much of the gain attributed to one-time benefits of tax changes and other issues.”

  • We knew we were forgetting something. John Kelly tells us that yesterday was Journalist Day.

  • McClatchy again hit by setbacks.

  • The 2007 Weblog Awards announced…with the Extreme-ness taking a bronze!

  • Wonkette: “WaPo Repressing Horrible Headline Word Choice

  • FEMA Press Secretary Directed Fake News Briefing, Inquiry Finds

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “Time Warner must focus on being ‘the most profitable, not the biggest’ entertainment company, and his team must concentrate on boosting the stock ‘now,’ CEO designate Jeffrey Bewkes said here Wednesday in his first public appearance since being tapped for the promotion.”

  • Rachel Sklar says, “Goodbye my Finger Bowl.”

  • Digital Drives Discovery Results

  • David Westin’s ABC News Re-Org Continues

  • Stars and Stripes Ombudsman: “ASY arrangement threatened Stripes’ objectivity

  • Confederate Yankee reports, “At least two of the leading advertisers for The New Republic are reconsidering their advertising relationships with the magazine in the wake of the magazines handling of the Scott Beauchamp “Shock Troop” scandal.”

  • FT.com reports, “Warner Bros has signalled its intention of expanding more aggressively into the video games industry with the acquisition of TT Games, the UK publisher of the LEGO Star Wars series which has sold 12m copies around the world.”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “You might expect a former studio chief like Michael Eisner to side with the studios over the current writers strike, and you would be very right. Speaking at the Dow Jones/Nielsen Media and Money conference this morning, the ex-Disney honcho called the Writers Guild work stoppage ‘stupid,’ ‘misguided’ and ‘insanity.’

  • Another FEMA Official Leaves In Wake of Scandal

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Three days in, the writers strike is hitting television hard as schedules are being juggled, overall deals suspended, production on series shut down and layoffs kick in.”

  • New York Post reports, “NBC may be trying to claw its way out of the prime-time TV ratings cellar, but that’s not stopping the network’s party-hearty new savior, Ben Silverman, from praising himself and bashing the top dogs at rivals ABC and FOX.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp., the media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch, said first-quarter profit fell 13 percent from a year earlier, when a gain from the sale of investments boosted results. Sales topped analysts’ estimates.”

  • RumorMonger reports, “Digg is close to announcing its sale to a major media player for $300 million to $400 million, according to sources close to the company, I hear.”

  • Reuters reports, “Digital video recorder company TiVo Inc is offering a new service giving advertisers detailed profiles of its users, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday in its online edition.”

  • B&C reports, “On the News Corp. earnings conference call Wednesday, president and chief operating officer Peter Chernin said, ‘A strike is probably a positive for the company.’”

    Jobs

  • International Justice Mission is looking for a Director of Media Relations.

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.22.07

  • An ABC release announces that “World News with Charles Gibson” will air a special series — “Key to the World” — reported by ABC News’ Bill Weir. “The series will take Weir on reporting assignments around the globe, and in conjunction, ‘World News’ will have a single commercial sponsor the first four Mondays in April — April 2, 9, 16, and 23.”

  • John Kelly uncovers “some surprises” at the Radio & Television Museum in Bowie, “a labor of love by members of the Radio History Society that opened in 1999.”

  • Charles Babington reports, “The proposed merger of the nation’s two satellite radio companies came under sharp criticism” Tuesday from Sen. Herb Kohl.

  • From The Hill:

      Reporters have a lot of access on Capitol Hill, but the Standing Committee of Correspondents made it clear this week that such access has its limits.

      Following an incident in which a reporter mistakenly walked onto the House floor, the standing committee issued a memo Tuesday stating, “Reporters are not allowed on the floor of the House or the Senate.”

  • 1M Comcast Subs Face C-SPAN2 Cutback

  • Tom Friedman celebrates 100 weeks of his book’s success.

  • In Memoriam: Catherine Seipp.

  • DCRTV reports, “XM Satellite Radio will launch a special radio channel featuring a mix of music and vintage audio dedicated to the sport. Play Ball will air from 3/30 through the end of opening day on 4/2 on XM-200.”

  • Politico’s Jonathan Martin reports how advances in media technology advances could make Sen. John McCain’s second bid for president a bumpier ride than his first run.

  • New York Times looks at how Iraq has changed the face of television “since the early, heady days of shock and awe.”

  • A tipster tells us about PBS: “You should know that there’s been some moving and shaking there. They hired a new SVP of Interactive — Jason Seiken, formerly executive editor of washingtonpost.com and something or other at AOL. Also, they hired Angela Morgenstern as new director of interactive. She used to head MTV News interactive (and before that produced for PBS).”

  • The International Center for Journalists announced that it is naming its internship program after former Vice President Whayne Dillehay, “in honor of more than 15 years of dedication and passion.”

  • Today at Nathan’s, Mark Plotkin will give an update on all things political before DC Police Chief Cathy Lanier.

  • Did the Edwards / Fox flap backfire? Either way, Paul Begala says it’s time to go Fox hunting

  • Michele McLellan and Tim Porter, authors of the new book News, Improved: How America’s Newsrooms Are Learning to Change, will present the findings from new national survey on training for U.S. midcareer journalists. Check it out at the news conference at the J.W. Marriott Tuesday, March 27 at 9 a.m. Eric Newton, Vice President/Journalism Program, of the Knight Foundation, will also be present.

  • The Northern Virginia Daily in Strasburg, Va., “needs a copy editor who knows the basics and is ready to take the next step.”

  • CQPolitics.com probably having a ton of fun with the Congress-March Madness nexus. Check out this, this, and this.

  • Don’t forget to check out the 2007 Reel Journalism: Screenings and Symposia which starts tonight. Check out the full schedule here.

  • GW announced the creation of a master’s degree program in strategic public relations through the Graduate School of Political Management. The program begins fal 2007.

  • Josh Gerstein discovers how a “New Technique Lets Bloggers Tackle Late-Night News Dumps.”

  • David Brooks got the shaft from Rudy Giuliani, who instead gave some love to Nicholas Kristof.

  • Sign the petition to make The Colbert Report a full hour.

  • John Hughes makes his pitch to keep Voice of America’s budget in tact.

  • The staff of the forth coming Portfolio have been given a gag order on Conde Nast’s new business magazine.

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.07.07

  • Most of you think highly of your direct editor.

  • 1,000 Journalists Killed in 10 Years While Reporting

  • Air America Radio 2.0 begins.

  • An NBC release announced that “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams” was “No. 1 in most all demographics including the key demo adults 25-54 during the week of February 26 — March 2, 2007. “Nightly’s” “+132,000 advantage over ABC in the key
    demographic represents the program’s best advantage over “World News” since the week of January 15, 2007.”

  • An ABC release announced that “World News with Charles Gibson” was “the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers and Households” for the week of February 26 — March 2, marking the second week in a row and the third time in four weeks “World News” has ranked #1 in these top categories.

  • In his upcoming column, Vanity Fair’ Michael Wolff looks at how through the Scooter Libbyt trial, the Bush administration, “could well have brought one of the greatest marketing and P.R. success stories of the modern era — the rise of conservatism and the Republican Party — to an end.”

  • Gelf Magazine’s Sarah Raymond looks at how the translation or interpretations of statements that foreign correspondents often rely on can result in some serious confusion.

  • Vanity Fair Editor Graydon Carter announced that that Bono will serve as Vanity Fair’s “first-ever” guest editor. Bono will edit the magazine’s Africa Issue for July, which he is doing on behalf of (RED).

  • Mother Jones takes a new look at “25 Years of Media Mergers. From GE-NBC to Google-YouTube.”

  • The PEJ News Index shows that “tornadoes in the South and a financial plunge on Wall Street” joined two stories that “typically dominate the Index” — the 2008 Presidential campaign and the Iraq debate.

  • Foreign Policy announced in a release that Lawrence Wright won the 2007 Lionel Gelber Prize for his book The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11, published by Alfred A. Knopf. “The annual prize is awarded to the author of the world’s best book on international affairs.” Other finalists were Robert Kagan’s Dangerous Nation: America’s Place in the World from Its Earliest Days to the Dawn of the Twentieth Century; Margaret MacMillan’s Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World; David Malone’s The International Struggle over Iraq: Politics in the UN Security Council 1980–2005; and Thomas E. Ricks’ Fiasco: The American Military Adventure in Iraq.

  • FootNoted.Org expresses surprise upon learning that Gannett’s top execs will no longer have “any allowance” for home security systems or club membership fees. “What’s the next perk to go? Could it be the end of the ‘company provided lunch’?”

  • ABC News’ Brian Ross and Vic Walter report, “Whistle-blower AT&T technician Mark Klein says his effort to reveal alleged government surveillance of domestic Internet traffic was blocked not only by U.S. intelligence officials but also by the top editors of the Los Angeles Times.”

  • Washington Post’s John Kelly provides a look at “pre-BlackBerry journalism” through the Ralph M. McKenzie’s 1903 “Washington Correspondents Past and Present — Brief Sketches of the Rank and File.”

  • Al Tompkins takes a look behind the National Press Photographers Association’s judging of the Television Photojournalism contest. “By week’s end, they will have witnessed countless calamities and odd characters of every description.”

  • A reader asks, “Mike Sniffen wrote the AP Libby story. His wife Laurie Asseo wrote the Bloomberg Libby story. Wonder which one was better.”

  • Taking Out The Trash, 02.28.07

  • Hmm… There seems to be a split verdict on Scooter Libby’s guilt. The innocents have it by a hair.

  • Bush Administration FOIA Report Card Hits New Low

  • John Kelly loves letters to the editor.

  • An update to our post yesterday re: beat changes at the Washington Times. Eric Pfeiffer will has been bumped up to the Capitol Hill beat, along with business reporter Sean Langell (they’ll join Christina Bellantoni and S.A. Miller).

  • After accidentally putting perfume, and not contact lens solution, onto her contact lens (thanks to those lovely TSA “3-oz. bottle” rules), WAMU’s Diane Rehm instantly burned “Ninety percent of Rehm’s epithelium (the layer of cells that covers the cornea’s surface).”

  • Left-wing bloggers have a beef with the Politico.

  • And CJR has a beef with John Solomon

  • DCRTV has a Kornheiser rant…

  • More of Bob Woodruff’s conversation with Charlie Gibson from last night.

  • An ABC release announced that “Nightline” “continued its growth trend in both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic” for the week of February 12. This is the highest post in total viewers since October, 2006.

  • Another ABC release announced that “World News with Charles Gibson” was the number 1 evening newscast among total viewers, adults and household for the week of February 19-23 for the second time in three weeks. This is also “the fourth consecutive week the broadcast has placed first among Adults 25-54.”

  • This kind of sourcing confusion could make your head explode.

  • B&C takes a hard look at new vs. old media. “The cuts reflect a grim reality for these media giants: Staying ahead often means cutting heads. As viewers shift their media-consumption habits, TV operations are forced to take a hard look at how they have been run and staffed for years. And in many cases, they’ve realized, they just don’t need the same people they used to.”

  • PEJ News Coverage Index shows that the 2008 presidential campaign was the top story (12%) for the week of February 18-23. The Iraq policy debate finished second (11%) followed by the Anna Nicole Smith story (10%).

  • << PREVIOUS PAGE