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Posts Tagged ‘Judith Regan’

Morning Media Menu: David Gregory, Politico/Reuters and Regan/Wolff

On this morning’s mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu, TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer, FishbowlNY’s Glynnis MacNicol and I discussed David Greogry‘s debut on “Meet the Press,” the Politico/Reuters partnership and the Judith Regan v. Michael Wolff fiasco.

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Morning Reading List, 03.05.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | BOOKS | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Visiting the Newseum at some point is on most of your to-do lists.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • FishbowlLA’s Tiny Dupuy makes a visit to D.C..

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Reuters reports, “Lawyers who represented book publisher Judith Regan in a $100 million lawsuit against News Corp sued her on Monday, saying she did not reimburse them for fees and cut them out of her settlement payment.”

  • “Hillary Clinton’s complaints about a pro-Barack Obama media tilt helped prompt examinations of Obama’s record and catapulted him to a first-place finish in the competition for media exposure the week of Feb. 25-March 2, according to a Project for Excellence study of campaign coverage.”

  • Crain’s New York reports, “Under a new Wall Street Journal policy revealed to staffers last week, authors such as Pulitzer Prize winner Daniel Golden — whose series of articles on the college admissions process led to his critically-acclaimed book, The Price of Admission — would have to fork over some of their book proceeds to none other than Rupert Murdoch himself.”

  • War and Peace offers reaction to The Washington Post’s piece titled “We Scream, We Swoon. How Dumb Can We Get?”

  • SABEW announced,Floyd Norris, The New York Times’s chief financial correspondent, will receive the 2008 Distinguished Achievement Award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) at its 45th annual conference in Baltimore, Md., on April 28.”

  • His Extreme-ness shares “a couple of fascinating tidbits from the Post’s preview of the Newseum grand opening”

  • “Politico’s tussle with Obama campaign shines light on how sausage gets made.”

  • Dana Milbank writes, “It took many months and the mockery of ‘Saturday Night Live’ to make it happen, but the lumbering beast that is the press corps finally roused itself from its slumber Monday and greeted Barack Obama with a menacing growl. The day before primaries in Ohio and Texas that could effectively seal the Democratic presidential nomination for him, a smiling Obama strode out to a news conference at a veterans facility here. But the grin was quickly replaced by the surprised look of a man bitten by his own dog. Reporters from the Associated Press and Reuters went after him for his false denial that a campaign aide had held a secret meeting with Canadian officials over Obama’s trade policy. A trio of Chicago reporters pummeled him with questions about the corruption trial this week of a friend and supporter. The New York Post piled on with a question about him losing the Jewish vote.”

  • New York Daily News reports, “Angry Barack Obama bombarded by media”

  • Rush and Malloy write, “Power lawyer Robert Bennett got to be one of Washington’s top litigators by knowing how to keep his cool. But the highly paid scandal-fixer barely conceals his rage toward some people in his new memoir, ‘In the Ring.’ Bennett heaps scorn on New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. in the chapter in which he recalls his defense of Times reporter Judith Miller, who went to jail rather than reveal her sources in reporting on CIA operative Valerie Plame.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer asks, “As a leading indicator of the newspaper biz’s health, what does the chain’s bad news portend for the rest of the industry?”

  • Washington Times’s Joseph Curl reports, McCain skewers pork for press.

  • The New York Sun reports, “It’s not every day that one finds a tax policy argument in the world-famous gossip column of the New York Post, but there it was yesterday in ‘Page Six’: The news was that the publisher of the New York Times, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., had sold his Upper West Side apartment to his wife for $3.25 million for what a Times spokeswoman described as ‘estate-planning purposes.’”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer asks, “As a leading indicator of the newspaper biz’s health, what does the chain’s bad news portend for the rest of the industry?”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ won the February 2008 sweep in total viewers and homes. For the sweep, ‘Nightly News’ averaged 9.532 million total viewers.” Also, NBC announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of February 25, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 9.171 million total viewers”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the just-completed February Sweep, ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54, averaging a 2.4/9 and 2.96 million. This marks the second consecutive February Sweep that ‘World News’ has placed first among key demo viewers. It is also the fourth time in five sweeps periods the ABC broadcast has won among Adults 25-54. Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ averaged 9.28 million.”

  • Crain’s New York reports, “For the past few months, people across the United States have taken part in a closely fought contest, full of twists and turns, that has finally produced an unexpected winner. That’s right: There’s a new front-runner in the cable news race. Buoyed by a historic Democratic primary season that has drawn new voters—and new viewers — CNN’s prime-time audience of 25- to 54-year-olds soared 150% in February over year-earlier levels. The boost gave the Time Warner-owned channel its first victory over the Fox News Channel in six years.”

  • We hear NewsChannel 8 would not air last week’s Q&A Cafe interview with NBC 4′s meteorologist Bob Ryan, because they consider him the competition. The program will, however, air on DC Cable/TV 16 this Friday, because they don’t think of him as competition. The full interview is now available on YouTube.

  • Bloomberg reports, “A federal regulator today called for an investigation into why an Alabama television station lost its signal as the CBS News program ’60 Minutes’ aired a segment questioning the jailing of a former Democratic governor.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Forbes.com reports, “The value of merger and acquisition deals in the U.S. media industry could reach record levels in 2008 if pending mega deals like Microsoft’s bid for Yahoo! are completed, PriceWaterhouseCoopers said in a report released Monday.”

  • E&P reports, “Earlier this month, Kiyoshi Martinez started an experimental website that gives journalists a chance to vent their feelings about their profession and their work lives. And have they ever. AngryJournalist.com is a simple yet powerful concept: a gripe board where journalists are asked to say what’s making them angry today. It’s the modern-day equivalent of the anonymous suggestion box in the company lunchroom. All posts to the site are anonymous. Everything submitted goes through Martinez, who screens out trolls and spammers and non-relevant stuff.”

  • The Horses Mouth reports, “Most Media Observers Side With Hillary Campaign Claim That Press Has Been Harder On Her”

  • “Yeas & Nays has learned that the Center for American Progress’ Grant Ginder was recently ghost-writing for gossip Web site TMZ.com.”

  • NPR’s On The Media reports, “Campaign correspondents tread a narrow path between political analysis and outright prognostication. Once quick to predict the future (Google these words: wrong about New Hampshire), are reporters now more circumspect? And is all coverage created equal? New York Magazine’s John Heilemann weighs in.”

  • Mark Glaser asks, “I struggle nearly every week with an identity problem: Am I a blogger or a journalist? Most times, I can take the easy way out and think of myself as the nouveau blogger/journalist or journalist/blogger — but which one comes first? nags my inner pigeon-holer.”

  • The Weekly Standard asks, “Who Lost James Fallows?” And, “It was sort of stunning to listen to, and the response from the Defense official was not unlike Tony Snow’s famous quip to Helen Thomas, ‘Well, thank you for the Hezbollah view.’ Whatever angst the left once had about these calls, they can rest assured that the propaganda isn’t going from the Pentagon to the bloggers, but vice versa.”

  • Hot Air.com reports, “It’s only the first day of the Tony Rezko trial, testimony has yet to be heard, and already the press has gotten to Barack Obama. Faced with a new focus on his ties to the defendant in a corruption case and exposed missteps in his NAFTA dance, Obama stalked out of a press conference with questions ringing in his ears”

  • MSNBC’s First Read reports, “Obama Tangles with the Press”

  • Politico’s Chris Frates reports, “The oh-so-unhip world of business trade associations took a small shot at edginess Monday when nearly a dozen groups launched the blog BizCentral.org, aimed at Washington’s influencers.”

  • CQ Politics reports,Mike McConnell’s Temporary Spokesman Has a Full-Time Job”

  • Portfolio reports, “Digging Digg’s Grave? Changes to the popular content-ranking website threaten to alienate its most dedicated users.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • MinOnline reports, “This Friday (March 7), ‘USA Today’ Gives Readers ‘Openair.’”

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    BOOKS

  • A release announced, “Oxford University economist Paul Collier has won the 2008 Lionel Gelber Prize for his book The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries Are Failing and What Can Be Done About It (Oxford University Press), Judith Gelber, chair of the Lionel Gelber Prize Board”

  • The father and son team of Lou and Carl Cannon wrote Reagan’s Disciple: George W. Bush’s Troubled Quest for a Presidential Legacy. Check out the New York Times review here.

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Playbook reports, “ABC’s Ann Compton, president of the White House Correspondents’ Association, shows both experience and judgment in announcing the menu for this year’s dinner, which features a rejuvenated and expanded scholarship program: spiced tenderloin, followed by white chocolate drowning in raspberries.”

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    JOBS

  • National Geographic News is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • SIGNAL Magazine is looking for a Managing Editor.

  • The Roanoke Times is looking for a Healthcare Reporter.

  • Philip Merrill College of Journalism is looking for an Abell Professor in Baltimore Journalism, a Knight Visiting Professor in Digital Innovation and a Shirley Povich Chair in Sports Journalism.

  • Alliance for School Choice is looking for a Grant Writer for Major DC Nonprofit, Education Reform.

  • Sidwell Friends School is looking for a Director of Publications.

  • Environment & Energy Publishing, LLC is seeking experienced reporter.

  • The Daily Press is looking for a Features reporter and an Education Reporter.

  • The Seattle Times is looking for a Washington, D.C. reporter.

  • PBS is seeking talented candidates for the position of Digital Producer.

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for an Ad Layout Coordinator.

  • Patuxent Publishing Co. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • American Architectural Foundation is looking for a Communications Manager.

  • The World Bank is looking for someone in Communications/Public Affairs.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.15.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you don’t count religious services as a regular activity.

  • An ABC release announces, “On Tuesday, November 20, ABC News’ Charles Gibson will conduct an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with President George Bush and First Lady Laura Bush at Camp David, the private presidential retreat. The interview, just days before the Thanksgiving holiday, will cover a variety of topics, including: the war in Iraq, turmoil in Pakistan, the state of the economy, and rising gas prices.”

  • A release announced, “Ten Washington DC area women who proudly stand at 5’4″ and under have made the first annual Washington DC Petite and Chic List. Petite specialty retailer Petite Sophisticate is releasing the list in conjunction with the opening of two new stores in the Washington DC area. The list includes local women, 5’4″ and under, who show that women of all heights are stylish and chic.” The ten women are Sen. Barbara Boxer, Lynne Cheney, Nicole Feld, Kathy Fowler, Kathleen Matthews, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Marisa Ramírez de Arellan, Raven, Helen Thomas and Eun Yang.

  • Kiplinger.com has named former AOL programming manager Cindy Schwalb as online content coordinator based in DC.

  • Patterico’s Pontifications reports, Anwyn has an excellent post today from the ‘Facts You Don’t Need to Know’ file of the Los Angeles Times. Anwyn chose to focus on a story the paper recently ran on the prosecutorial record of Fred Thompson. I read that article and meant to comment on its flippant dismissiveness of Thompson’s stint as an AUSA. Some of the lines in the article are blatantly designed to elicit cheap snickers from leftists”

  • Ann Althouse reports,Matt Yglesias is outraged — just outraged — at Tim Russert. How dare that man drive politicians into a corner with tough questions instead of giving them space to inform us. According to Yglesias, questions with the goal of providing information about the candidates’ policies would — take global warming for example — show how fine the Democrats are and trap only Republicans.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “After an exhaustive search, The New York Times has found its new corporate media reporter: Fortune’s Tim Arango will begin work next month.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Silver Spring-based cable network Discovery Health has pulled the series ‘Plastic Surgery: Before and After’ from its lineup this week after reports that the show’s host, physician Jan Adams, operated on the mother of hip-hop artist Kanye West before she died Saturday.”

  • Tuesday was the first anniversary of the launch of DarynKagan.com and Kagan celebrated the occasion on Oprah & Friends. Check out the show here.

  • In addition to his interview with Fox Business News yesterday, President Bush also recorded an interview with Fox News.

  • This is Jade Floyd’s (resident hottie) last week as Communications Manager for American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. She has taken a position as senior associate at the public affairs firm Chlopak, Leonard, Schechter and Associates, based here in D.C.

  • War on Photography reports, “I have to give credit where credit is due. The City of New York has reconsidered its proposal to require permits and insurance from most photographers.”

  • Media Daily News reports, “News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch all but declared on Tuesday that the sky’s-the-limit profits from traditional broadcast TV are over.”

  • DCRTV reports, Jon Sullivan, commercial producer director at Channel 7/WJLA, picks up a national Emmy for ‘Best Local Public Service Announcement’ for his ‘Choose To Save’ campaign entitled ‘Savingsman.’”

  • Seems The Hill has decided they need some flair instead of flare.

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “In the days before mounting a strike against Hollywood studios, film and TV writers did something that might be considered unusual in other labor disputes: They completed — and were paid for — a lot of work that was delivered to the companies they were about to picket. Now, the Writers Guild of America, which represents the striking writers, is scrambling to get copies of all the scripts turned in to studios over the past six months as part of an effort to police the use of nonunion labor to complete or polish union work. So far, however, by most estimates, the union’s efforts to collect all of those scripts has fallen far short of its goal.”

  • The AP reports, “The Associated Press promoted Managing Editor Mike Silverman to the new position of senior managing editor Monday, and named news executives John Daniszewski, Lou Ferrara and Kristin Gazlay as managing editors. The moves come amid a reorganization of operations at the news cooperative.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The U.S. newspaper industry’s Audit Bureau of Circulations said it will change the way it counts paid circulation to provide marketers with more useful information.”

  • Market Watch reports, “Shareholders of Sirius Satellite Radio and XM Satellite Radio voted Tuesday to approve Sirius’ proposed $13.6 billion acquisition of XM.”

  • Variety reports, “In the months since Dane Cook first mounted his groundbreaking MySpace marketing campaign and ‘Saturday Night Live’s’ ‘Lazy Sunday’ skit helped vault YouTube to a billion-dollar Google buyout, online comedy sites have become as common as bad party jokes.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “Newspapers’ paying readership fell again in the industry’s latest circulation reports last week, but publishers took the opportunity to make their boldest pitch yet for counting everyone who sees their news stories — whether by buying a copy or borrowing one, picking up a print copy or finding the paper online.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp. probably won’t buy Clearwire Corp., the wireless Internet service provider whose shares surged today on speculation the largest U.S. cable- television company will offer to acquire it, according to Sanford C. Bernstein & Co.”

  • A release announced, “A prominent national Islamic civil rights and advocacy group today announced the launch of a major initiative to help enhance understanding of Islam and Muslims in the news media.
    At a news conference in the nation’s capital, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) said the centerpiece of its ‘Beyond Stereotypes’ campaign will be distribution of the newly-published ‘American Muslims: A Journalist’s Guide to Understanding Islam and Muslims’ to some 40,000 media professionals nationwide.”

  • TVNewser reports, “In what it calls the ‘biggest expansion of international newsgathering resources in its 27-year history,’ CNN is adding correspondents, opening a newsgathering hub in the UAE and investing in a digital-production unit in London.”

  • The AP reports, “Yahoo Inc., reeling from a growing backlash over human rights and its China operations, settled a lawsuit Tuesday that accused it of illegally helping the Chinese government jail and torture two journalists.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Court TV is firing 16 of the 31 people on its Web staff as the network, which is changing its name to truTV in January, shifts its online trial coverage to CNN.com.”

  • Stars and Stripes reports, “Midlevel editors at Stars and Stripes have called on the newspaper’s acting publisher to resign, saying he has refused to release information on the extent of the paper’s relationship with America Supports You.”

  • Media Life reports, “The news was of the sort that just several years ago would have shocked many, word that Condé Nast was folding House & Garden, the 100-plus-year-old shelter title. But in these far tougher times, last week’s news was not such a shock after all, as just the most recent in a line of closings that have beset the magazine industry.”

  • Helium.com, a social media site that shares its ad revenues with its most popular contributors, has announced a partnership with nonprofit organization OpenTheGovernment.”

  • The National Press Club announced, “NPF has selected Linda Topping Streitfeld as its new Director of Programs following a nationwide search. Streitfeld has been an editor and manager at The Miami Herald since 1992, working on coverage of the 2000 presidential election, education, growth and development, hurricanes and near-misses, government and politics. She managed a major Miami Herald community news initiative and contributed to the newspaper’s robust website and other multimedia efforts.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Filmmaker Sean Fine bristles at the suggestion that his strikingly handsome new documentary, “War/Dance,” is too pretty to tell a gritty story. … ‘War/Dance,’ which Fine shot and co-directed with his wife, Andrea Nix Fine, certainly looks great, even as it deals movingly with the lives of displaced kids in northern Uganda. A low-grade war has been simmering there for 20 years, with children often being conscripted by a rebel group known as the Lord’s Resistance Army.” The movie opens on Friday.

  • Min Online reports, “‘Magazines have an illustrious past, but they have a wonderful future,’ proudly proclaimed Time editor-in-chief Richard Stengel upon accepting min magazine’s award for Top Reinvention of the Year”

  • Public Eye reports, “Criticisms of the White House press corps come fast and furious in MediaLand and Blogistan. (From accusations like they’re ‘an extension of the Clinton spin machine’ to its ‘meekness’ in covering the Bush presidency.) But very rarely do they come from the White House press corps itself. Until this week.”

  • Check out this week’s Ombudsman’s Mailbag from PBS’s Michael Getler.

  • The New York Post reports, “A bidding war has erupted for the rights to Sen. Ted Kennedy’s (D-Mass.) autobiography, which could end up well into the mid-seven figure range.”

  • A release announced, “ICFJ’s Knight International Journalism Fellowships Program receives grants from Knight and Gates foundations to advance journalism excellence and free expression worldwide”

  • Digg the Blog reports, “The Wall Street Journal Online is adding Digg buttons across the entire site, and you’ll now have full (free) access to the articles submitted to Digg.”

  • New York Times reports,Don Imus, whose cowboy hat and western wear looked out of place on MSNBC, may have found a more comfortable saddle. On Dec. 3, when he returns not only to radio but also to television, it will be on RFD-TV, a cable and satellite channel that caters to farmers, ranchers and equestrians, as well as others who merely aspire to live a small-town life.”

  • DCRTV reports, “FTVLive tells us that former Channel 5/WTTG morning news anchor Michael Gargiulo has been promoted to the 5:30 PM anchor gig at NYC’s WNBC-TV, where he had been weekend morning anchor and reporter”

  • The Smoking Gun reported yesterday, “Judith Regan, the volcanic publishing industry figure who sought to publish O.J. Simpson’s ‘I Did It’ (and trysted with Bernard Kerik in an apartment overlooking Ground Zero) today sued Rupert Murdoch’s media conglomerate for defamation, claiming that she was unjustly tarred as an anti-Semite when fired last year. In a blistering $100 million lawsuit filed today in New York State Supreme Court, Regan, 54, accuses several defendants, including Murdoch’s News Corporation and HarperCollins Publishers, of orchestrating a smear campaign that was intended to advance the Murdoch political agenda and protect ‘Rudy Giuliani’s presidential ambitions.’”

  • TVWeek reports, “Although the Writers Guild of America’s pre-strike media campaign was criticized as sluggish, the guild’s headline-grabbing series of protests last week have managed to attract the sympathy of some viewers.”

  • Also of note on E&P’s 30 Most Popular Newspaper Sites for October, The Washington Times shows a bump from last month.

  • DCist reports, “Fox5 reported on Sunday that a member of their staff, Gwen Tolbart, was injured in a collision between her car and a Metrobus on Saturday night on her way home. Tolbart was thankfully not seriously hurt, but the bus driver, Harvey Carey of Lanham, has now been charged with failing to stay in the proper lane, which resulted in the accident.”

  • E&P reports, “The board of the Audit Bureau of Circulations voted on a set of wide-sweeping changes that will put more prominence on the metric of total audience and affect the way newspaper circulation is counted.”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is taking a swipe at FNC over the $100M lawsuit filed by Judith Regan. Regan worked for News Corp.-owned publisher HarperCollins.”

  • The Daily Northwestern reports, “The process of transforming the curriculum at the Medill School of Journalism to keep up with the times is a work in progress, Dean John Lavine told about 70 students, faculty and others at a forum Monday night.”

  • The New York Sun reports, “There were red faces at the Manhattan Institute, after the Union Club ejected reporters from an awards lunch in its Upper East Side clubhouse where they had been invited to hear Mayor Bloomberg and the former governor of Florida, Jeb Bush, speak” on Tuesday.

  • Washington Post reports, “The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission yesterday proposed relaxing an agency rule to allow big-city newspapers to buy the smaller television stations in their markets, a move designed as a compromise in the ongoing issue of corporate control of the airwaves.”

  • The New York Observer reports,Imus Is Back! But Not Quite Live! Bloodied Radio Cowboy Returns Dec. 3 With 21-Second Delay”

  • Paul Sullivan is a veteran newspaper editor and editor in chief of citizen journalism site Orato.com. Check out the site here.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “For James Goldston, executive producer of ‘Nightline,’ the prospect of a prolonged writers strike that paralyzes much of the television industry offers an awkward upside.”

  • Poynter has the memo from Stars and Stripes Europe bureau chief Sam Amrhein announcing, “I want to inform you that the overseas bureau chiefs Joe, Marni, Tom Skeen, Tim Flack, Chris Carlson and I ­ have called for Max Lederer to step down as acting publisher.”

  • The CJR asks, “A plea to campaign reporters: please resist the temptation to use Sin City-centric clichés in your coverage of Thursday’s Democratic debate in Las Vegas.”

  • BusinessJournalism.org reports, “The number of ‘green’ business stories published in the nation’s 10 largest newspapers this year has already doubled last year’s total, according to a study released Tuesday by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.”

  • Dave and Thomas reports, “NBC Direct is the Peacock’s answer to Internet video and if you are a fan of NBC shows like The Office and Heroes, be prepared to get a little angry. The good news is you can now download various NBC shows to your computer. And it’s free. Kinda. Free like giving an army recruiter you home phone number. First and foremost, you cannot get these shows onto you iPod. Second, it’s only available to PC users with IE only. Third, and this is the most annoying, you must download a crap-load of software to play the videos.”

  • E&P reports, “A top business-side executive at Dow Jones & Co. said it is premature to assume that The Wall Street Journal Web site will definitely drop its paid subscription model, despite comments by Rupert Murdoch that the change is expected.”

  • A Newsweek release via Romenesko announced, “Markos Moulitsas, the founder and publisher of dailykos.com, will become a Newsweek contributor for the 2008 presidential campaign, offering occasional opinion pieces to the pages of the magazine and to Newsweek.com.”

  • Mickey Kaus gives another scathing review of The Atlantic’s anniversary party.

  • CJR reports how “The New York Times went and put the ‘science’ back in the ‘political science’ of the campaign trail.”

    Jobs

  • PBS is looking for a Web Technologist and a Director for PBS Engage.

  • PBS Interactive is looking for an Associate Director, Content & Video.

  • The Star Democrat is seeking a layout editor and reporter.

  • EEI Communications is looking for an Editorial Production Director.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Science Writer.

  • The New Republic is looking for an Assistant Editor.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military Publications is looking to fill a position in Advertising/Sales.

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Comments and Group Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext