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Posts Tagged ‘Leonard Downie’

News Notes: Print Edition

NYT plans to cut 100 newsroom jobs by the end of this year. No word yet on how that will affect the DC bureau. FishbowlNY has executive editor Bill Keller‘s internal memo, which says, “As before, if we do not reach 100 positions through buyouts, we will be forced to go to layoffs. I hope that won’t happen, but it might.”

• A study by former WaPo executive editor Leonard Downie, Jr. and Columbia University’s Michael Schudson says government should help subsidize local journalism. “Rather than depending primarily on shrinking newspapers, communities should have a range of diverse sources of news reporting. They should include commercial and nonprofit news organizations that can both compete and collaborate with one another, adapting traditional journalistic forms to the multimedia, interactive capabilities of digital communication.” Downie and Schudson make a number of suggestions of public sources of support in today’s WaPo.

• And congrats are in order… The Atlantic‘s James Bennet is Ad Age’s Magazine Editor of the Year.

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Morning Reading List, 09.12.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 02.21.08

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Good morning Washington. Jennifer Love Hewitt is 29! (But don’t you dare say size 29…) Yesterday was David Corn’s bday. He’s also just 29.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • For the network you’d rather have a beer with, C-SPAN wins by a landslide. Could it be because His Extreme-ness is lobbying for a C-SPAN win?

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Should Newspapers Still Be Taking Sides?

  • The World Affairs Council is sponsoring an annual panel discussion with Foreign News Editors and Overseas Correspondents on Thursday, March 13th, from 6:30-8:00pm at The National Press Club. Leonard Downie, Jr. is moderating.

  • Free newspapers seek legal ads

  • Judy Miller: “Journalism on trial.”

  • Slime time: We already know about politicians’ capacity for coarse behavior. But how low can the press go?”

  • “After lengthy speculation about a tight and deadlocked race, the story line changed significantly in a week in which Democratic candidates overwhelmingly dominated the coverage, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study of campaign coverage. Although Clinton (57%) narrowly edged out Obama (55.5%) as a significant or dominant newsmaker in election stories from Feb, 11-17, Obama was the clear winner in terms of the tone. While the media dissected everything from Clinton’s staff shake-up to her loosening grasp on her core demographic voters, Obama’s momentum was the big story about his campaign.”

  • Why foreign correspondents’ ranks are thinning

    Top of post

    TV

  • Critics slam FCC chairman’s low-power TV plan

  • An ABC release announced, “‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54 for the week of February 11-15. The ABC News broadcast averaged 9.44 million Total Viewers, a 6.4/12 among Households, and a 2.5/9 among key demo viewers. For the sixth consecutive week, ‘World News’ won among Women 25-54 (2.8/10).”

  • Obama, ABC, and Attribution

  • The paranoid style of American punditry” and “paranoid stylings” and “Ceci nest pas une paranoia.”

  • Oh dear: David Gregory is dancing again.

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC News and CNBC have received a total of five Gracie Allen AwardsR. The 33rd annual Gracie Allen Award winners were announced today by the American Women in Radio and Television (AWRT). The national winners will be presented at a black-tie gala at the New York Marriot Marquis on Wednesday, May 28.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Ryan Lizza on the bus.

  • Jonathan Alter discusses the 2008 race.
  • Washingtonian’s Harry Jaffe writes, “Our local ‘gray lady’ always considered itself too serious to publish really good gossip, as in the New York Post’s Page Six, so it calls its Style-section gossip column the Reliable Source, suggesting that its items conform to the laws of serious journalism. Enter Celebritology, a Post.com blog written by Liz Kelly about the famous and foolish.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Politico is looking for Web Producers.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Business Journalism Intern.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America is looking for a Business Writer/Editor.

  • Congressional Quarterly, Inc. is looking for an Account Manager.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.27.07

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    Good morning Washington.

  • You are not encouraging your kids to follow in your journalism footsteps.

    Television

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of November 12, 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ outperformed CBS’ ‘Late Show with David Letterman’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54. In addition, ‘Nightline’ continues to close the gaps with ‘Letterman’ and ‘Leno’ among total viewers and Adults 25-54.”

  • The Carville-Matalin Joke Is on Us

  • New York Magazine reports,Dan Rather’s Last Big Story Is Himself”

  • Brokaw disses Limbaugh.

  • New York Times reports, “The head of the Federal Communications Commission is struggling to find enough support from a majority of the agency’s commissioners to regulate cable television companies more tightly.”

  • Looking into Fred Thompson’s claim against Fox News, The Huffington Post reports, “Evidence actually suggests a strong relationship between the Tennessean and the network that reports so that you can decide.”

  • The Street reports, “For investors, new media ownership rules proposed by the Federal Communications Commission are a sign that TV companies have little prayer of getting bigger anytime soon.”

  • FOX News Channel will carry a live feed of the Des Moines, Iowa Democrat and Republican debates hosted by Iowa Public Television and the Des Moines Register. Both debates will air on FNC at 2:00 p.m. EST with the Republican debate on Wednesday, Dec. 12th and the Democratic debate on Thursday, December 13th.

  • TVNewser reported last week, “MSNBC’s Tucker Carlson, a Dancing with the Stars contestant last year, made a return appearance on tonight’s show. In a spoof skit, Carlson — along with fellow ex-contestants Lisa Rinna, Harry Hamlin, and Laila Ali – check into ‘dance rehab’ (who knew?) in Malibu because they ‘haven’t been able to let go of being on Dancing With the Stars.’”

  • This Wednesday, the Advertising Club of Metropolitan Washington will present Michael Jack, President and General Manager of WRC-TV the Silver Medal Award at a luncheon event at the Willard Hotel.

  • “Not only was Keith Olbermann doing his normal Sunday night gig on NBC’s Football Night in America, he also lent his voice to two popular Fox sitcoms,” TVNewser reports.

  • The Business and Media Institute reports, “When Tom Brokaw, an old-time mainstream media figure in his own right, says he thinks print newspapers won’t be around in 10 years, that’s probably not a good sign for the industry.”

  • CNN’s Christiane Amanpour explains the safari-jacket look that has become her signature style.

  • Washington Post reports,George W. Hughes, 67, a retired broadcast engineer with ABC News and a dedicated model-train enthusiast, died Nov. 16 of respiratory failure at Virginia Hospital Center in Arlington County. He was a resident of South Riding.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS News correspondent Lara Logan and her team won the Association of International Broadcasters’ award for ‘Clearest Coverage of a Single News Event.’”

  • “mediabistro.com’s series So What Do You Do? features NBC News’ Middle East correspondent Richard Engel.”

  • Thompson Slams Fox News While On Fox News

    Radio

  • Washington City Paper’s Dave McKenna explores, “The decline of Sam Huff and Redskins radio”

    Online Media

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News and Facebook have launched a partnership focused on the 2008 presidential election. In this first of its kind collaboration, Facebook will feature an application that will provide its 56 million active users with tools for supporting candidates and discussing the campaign on Facebook combined with ABC News political content and information, including the latest news from the campaign trail.”

  • Slate reports, “You know it’s 2007 when a candidate, in this case Mike Huckabee, holds a bifurcated conference call, first with reporters, then with bloggers. I listened in on both calls to see what the differences were. The reporters’ questions were much more concise and polished. But the bloggers’ questions were more substantive by a long shot.”

  • Sky News reports, “The man behind one of the world’s most influential news websites says there’s everything to play for in the battle to win the trust of TV viewers, newspaper readers and web users — and, he says, it won’t all go the way of the big corporations. Matt Drudge of www.drudgereport.com was speaking to Sky News in his first interview for four years.”

    Newspapers

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes,Joan Walsh, editor-in-chief of Salon.com, posted a column Monday asking me to get involved in the recent ‘brawl’ on the op-ed page of The Times over the meaning of Ronald Reagan’s 1980 campaign visit to Philadelphia, Miss., where he told a mostly-white crowd, ‘I believe in states’ rights.’ Was it a coded appeal to Southern whites to vote Republican because Reagan and his party would side with them against efforts by blacks to achieve equal rights, as liberal columnists Paul Krugman and Bob Herbert contended?”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “The Washington Post stands accused this week of jumping the gun for published information embargoed by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. The Post story, by Johannesburg correspondent Craig Timberg, scooped the competition by reporting the United Nations’ plans this week to announce that it was drastically cutting its estimate of the size of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic from about 40 million to about 33 million. The Post published the story to the Web on Nov. 19, and led with the story in its Nov. 20 print edition.”

  • “While the national news media focused heavily on the 2008 presidential campaign last week, the public divided its interest between the campaign and the Iraq war. More than one-fifth of the national newshole (21%) was devoted to the presidential campaign, while news about the war — including the situation in Iraq, returning U.S. troops and the Iraq policy debate — drew only about half as much coverage,” according to the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

  • The Independent reports, “Rupert Murdoch has admitted to a parliamentary inquiry that he has ‘editorial control’ over which party The Sun and News of the World back in a general election and what line the papers take on Europe.”

  • Reuters reports, “The U.S. media industry is on the brink of a second downturn in a decade, one that could accelerate the divisions between fast-growing targeted advertising and traditional formats aimed at mass audiences.”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is rumoured to be in takeover talks with LinkedIn, the professional networking site founded by Reid Hoffman.”

  • New York Times reports, “The curious relationship between Hillary Rodham Clinton, presidential candidate, and Rupert Murdoch, media baron, flashed briefly before the eyes of Iowans on Saturday night during a Clinton campaign event.”

  • Washington Post reports,Juanita Daigle of Baton Rouge is listed as one of the thousands of people who sent e-mails to the Federal Communications Commission opposing the proposed merger between the satellite radio networks XM and Sirius. But Daigle said she never sent an e-mail and is distressed that anyone would think she did. ‘How did they get my name?’ she asked. ‘I don’t want someone using my name for something I don’t even know about.’ A check by The Washington Post of 60 people whose names were attached to identical, anti-merger e-mails instigated by the National Association of Broadcasters, a major opponent of the merger, produced mostly unanswered phone calls and recordings saying the phones were disconnected. Of the 10 people reached, nine said they never sent anything to the FCC, and only one said she remembered filling out something about Sirius but did not recall taking a position on a merger.”

  • “Fifty three percent of 300 media, advertising and entertainment executives believe writers should continue to ‘hold out for everything they want,’ with 47 percent voting for them to ‘pick up their pencils and get back to work.’ According to the poll conducted at www.jackmyers.com, a slight majority of a group that should be expected to be more sympathetic to the networks and studios express support for the Writers Guild of America.”

  • Vote now for the I Want Media 2007 Media Person of the Year.

  • Everything you have always wanted to know about André Wells’ style is right here.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “New York Daily News publisher Mort Zuckerman has told a House of Lords committee that new online business models for newspapers are just substituing ‘pennies for dollars’.”

  • DMNews reports, “The Wall Street Journal Europe has signed an agreement with The Jerusalem Post, putting the Post in charge of all distribution, printing, sales and marketing for WSJE in Israel.”

  • PRWeek reports, “The Economist has kicked off an online debate series to extend its brand to the social-media sphere. The first debate series, tackling education, launched last month. The second series is set for December.”

  • 23/6 reports, “With George W. Bush’s hapless former press secretary Scott McClellan issuing bleats of blame about having been tricked into lying to the press about the Plame affair, Paul Slansky looks back at some other White House mouthpieces.”

  • Washington Post’s Ruth Marcus writes, “In liberal Democratic circles, the debate over Social Security has taken a dangerous ‘don’t worry, be happy’ turn. … One prominent practitioner of this misguided approach is New York Times columnist Paul Krugman.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Back in August, Dow Jones and News Corp announced the names of five elderly appointees to the board that will oversee the editorial independence of The Wall Street Journal—a body established in response to Rupert Murdoch’s takeover. A month later, one of those appointees, former Republican Congresswoman Jennifer Dunn, died. The group hadn’t even met, and it was already down one.”

  • The City Paper has now launched a video component.

  • A release announced, “The Society of Professional Journalists is pleased to announce that it is now accepting entries for the Sigma Delta Chi Awards, which honor excellence in professional journalism in 48 categories, covering print, radio, television, newsletters, photography, online and research.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “The proposed merger between XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. looked dead on arrival back in February, with federal regulators appearing unlikely to give their approval of the $5 billion merger. Nine months later, Wall Street is picking up a different signal: that the deal might somehow pass muster”

  • Jonathan Miller has reappeared on the Internet scene, this time as a member of the board of directors for online search ad management startup, Clickable. Miller’s return comes after a rancorous departure from Time Warner, where he served as CEO of AOL. His landing pad, called Clickable, recently debuted their technology at the TechCrunch 40 conference in September.”

  • Politico reports, “On the evening of Nov. 13, the Wall Street Journal’s Paul Steiger received the prestigious Fourth Estate Award from the National Press Club, in Washington D.C., following a light-hearted roast from guests such as Sen. Joseph Lieberman and Washington Post executive editor Leonard Downie.”

  • Clinton Will Honor CBS Picket Line If Writers Strike

  • Wall Street Journal reports,Janet Grimley had some hard-won investment wisdom to share with colleagues at a gathering earlier this fall of the American Association of Sunday and Feature editors in Savannah, Ga. ‘Look at your comics pages like a stock portfolio,’ advised Ms. Grimley, an assistant managing editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. ‘Diversify. You need to have some risky comics,’ for instance the slightly subversive observational strip ‘F Minus,’ and ‘some safe purchases like the old favorites.’ Such ‘safe purchases’ would include blue chips like ‘Blondie,’ ‘Beetle Bailey,’ ‘Dennis the Menace’ and ‘Hagar the Horrible.’”

  • The Daily Princetonian reports, “In an age where print magazines are increasingly giving way to online journalism, The New Yorker is more important than ever, editor-in-chief David Remnick ’81 told a packed audience of senior citizens, faculty members and students.”

    Jobs

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. is looking for an Editor and a Reporter.

  • Transport Topics Publishing Group is looking for a staff Reporter.

  • American University is looking for a Communications Career Advisor.

  • Danville Register & Bee is seeking a sports reporter/page designer.

  • Observatory Group, LLC is looking for a ECB Analyst.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.07.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Taryn Luntz is joining The Examiner to cover Virginia and business news from the Seattle Times where she has been covering Washington for the paper.

  • Jen Lash is leaving Roll Call to be the assistant editor for Architectural Lighting. Her last day is Sept. 7.

  • From an ABC release, “On the eve of General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker’s highly anticipated testimony before Congress regarding the war in Iraq, ABC News will again examine how the Iraqi people and the country are faring in its sixth division-wide reporting effort, ‘Iraq: Where Things Stand,’” which will begin airing Sunday, September 9.

  • From a release, “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu has become a sponsor of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program that launches on September 17 at Tsinghua University. The goal of this unique initiative, run by this prestigious university and the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), is to create a new generation of business journalists able to produce insightful, balanced coverage of China’s markets and the global economy.”

  • Can you answer today’s Political Trivia from CQ?

  • We hear that the RSVP’s closed on Thursday for the GQ party. One tipster says they had an overwhelming response, with Bloomberg levels of attempted pre-crashing.

  • From TVNewser, “Despite Email Protest, Felling Back On Joe”

  • La Plata’s Media Policy Limits Access

  • TVWeek reports, “When Fox Business Network launches Oct. 15 nationally, it will be part of a round-robin channel shift in New York, home of Fox News and the financial capital of the country. The repositioning will involve channels owned by NBC Universal.”

  • Poynter Online points us to “great online news and tools for reporters in the latest edition of SEJ’s Watchdog Tipsheet, which covers First Amendment issues for journalists who cover the environment.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN is opening political bureaus in several key states as the race for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations heats up. A CNN insider tells TVNewser the bureaus in Des Moines, IA, Manchester, NH and Columbia, SC are already operational. They are being staffed at CNN Newsource affiliates in those cities.”

  • SEJ Panel Aims to Get Scientists, Journalists Working Together

  • A NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,’ iVillage.com and msnbc.com will join forces for a special series, ‘The Secret to Her Success.’ Beginning on September 10 and
    continuing throughout the week, ‘Nightly News’ will close the broadcast each evening with reports on four important topics (women’s health, work, finance and friendship), which will cross over to the far reaching online communities of iVillage and msnbc.com with additional reporting and components.”

  • C-SPAN’s Presidential Libraries: History Uncovered debates tonight. The first show is live from the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. For more information, click here.

  • Amy Gahran tackles, “Conversational Journalism: Credibility Gained or Status Lost?”

  • From a release, “To celebrate its 25th anniversary on Sept. 15, USA TODAY is partnering with American University’s School of Communication on a series of free live events to be held Sept. 10 through Sept. 14. In addition, a special exhibition of 25 USA TODAY front pages will be exhibited in the Katzen Arts Center throughout the week.” Events include some impressive panelists, including Helen Thomas, Eric Lichtblau, Ken Paulson, Judy Woodruff and Bob Schieffer. From E&P: “Assessing ‘USA Today’ As 25th Anniversary Approaches”

  • A reader gives us more info on Nina Totenberg’s singing habit. She apparently “comes from a musical family and occasionally sings at events for NPR.” She even sang at her own wedding.

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Bill O’Reilly blasts DailyKos as a ‘hate site,’ but according to a federal ruling released Tuesday, the popular liberal blog is as much a part of the media as Fox News when it comes to campaign finance rules.”

  • The Washington Blogger Meetup is September 19 at 7:00 p.m. at Regional Food and Drink. To RSVP “yes” click here.

  • “It’s almost fifty pages long, but well worth the read: a recent study by the Pew Research Center for People & the Press synthesizes 165 separate national surveys and finds that American news preferences have remained ‘surprisingly static’ over the last twenty years. Tucked behind this central conclusion, however, is a suite of more intriguing observations about readership and audience habits.”

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’”

  • The Boston Herald reports that Bill O’Reilly ranks #24 in Harvard’s list of most influential alumni, beating out Sen. Ted Kennedy’s #28.

  • “Project Censored Releases Censored 2008 and its pick of the 25 most important under-covered news stories of 2006-07. … Project Censored will host the award winning authors of the Censored 2008 stories at the second annual Media Accountability Conference October 26-27 at Sonoma State University.” Conference info is available here

  • CNN HD Debuts

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’” Journalists awarded second place in the online reporting category to Greenwire’s Michael Burnham, Kelly Thompson, Monica Trauzzi

  • From a release, “The 43-year-old Conservative Book Club has completed the acquisition of the American Compass Book Club. American Compass was launched three years ago as part of the Doubleday Entertainment family of clubs. Both clubs serve the philosophically conservative book-buying market. The combined clubs, which will operate under the Conservative Book Club name, will have a membership of more than 100,000. The deal was signed Tuesday in New York.”

  • A reader writes, “For the whiner complaining about the Sunday Source Perino thing, the SS goes to press on Wednesday. No way for them to see into the future.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNBC will air the first presidential debate to focus on economic issues.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Rejecting strong opposition from the cable industry, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin J. Martin is moving to require cable system operators to offer consumers both analog and fully digital signals for TV channels after the digital conversion, unless they provide a digital signal and converter box to every household.”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “The Washington Post fails to complete background check on Shaw activist.”

  • Washington Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie to discuss the future of the news business at SPJ.

  • From a SPJ release, “Chicago Sun-Times columnist Robert Novak to discuss CIA leak, Scooter Libby trial. … Novak and former Time, Inc., editor-in-chief Norman Pearlstine will be on hand during the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference to discuss the ethical questions of journalists as central players in a criminal prosecution and scandal. As part of the discussion, titled ‘Watching the Watchdogs: Ethical Implications of the Entangled Roles of Journalists in the Scooter Libby Case,’ Novak and Pearlstein will explain how they handled the dual roles as witnesses and journalists and the lessons learned. The event takes place at 2:45 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW.”

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “Over the next week, much will be written, pro and con, about General Petraeus’s report on the progress of the ‘surge’ in Iraq and President Bush’s response. Since both men have pretty much already announced, or at least rehearsed, what they are going to say, the suspense is not exactly crippling. I’ll be writing more later, but for now I’d simply like to address the media’s responsibility to address, over the next few days, this key moment in our recent history with a steady gaze — which, as I will recount, was sadly lacking last winter in the weeks before the ‘surge’ was announced.”

  • Notions Capital reports, “After decades, Washington, DC public station WAMU-FM is sending Bluegrass and other local music programs into that ‘Lonesome Valley’ of HD Radio where there is no one to hear them. … The FCC only approved digital HD Radio multicasting on March 22nd, but National Public Radio (NPR) has been hot to trot since May 2001, even before the FCC adopted the iBiquity HD Radio standard. Public stations have used it experimentally since 2004. NPR stations are the white mice of HD Radio. NPR headquarters for HD was even named the NPR Lab.”

  • From David Adler, CEO and Founder, BizBash Media, “It has been 8 years since starting to raise the money to launch BizBash after leaving PRIMEDIA. I am so thrilled that we are publishing our biggest issue ever at 260 pages and and continue to be the largest internet source for event planners around the world. Next year we will publish more than 20 issues in 6 major market with Chicago launching in January.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jay Rosen writes, “the press is not capable of making an independent decision denying the president his spin zone with a dateline in Iraq. When the White House says we’re going, they’re going.”

  • TVWeek reports, “The staffs of weekday and weekend broadcasts of ABC’s ‘World News’ will be combined under ‘World News With Charles Gibson’ executive producer Jon Banner and senior producer Vinnie Malhotra, who will continue as executive producer of weekend editions of ‘World News.’”

  • “‘Writers @ Work: A Process Approach,’ a four-week online course first offered last fall by News University, Poynter’s distance learning program. It’s scheduled again this year for October 15 to November 9.”

  • US News & World Report photojournalist James Lo Scalzo, author of a soon-to-be published memoir, Evidence of My Existence, has created a multi media synopsis of the memoir.

  • The Bob Edwards Show produced by XM Satellite Radio won 1st place from the Society of Environmental Journalists in the Beat/In-Depth Reporting category for the documentary “Exploding Heritage.”

    Jobs

  • Hanley Wood, LLC is looking for an Assistant Production Manager.

  • U.S.News & World Report is looking for a Health & Medicine Reporter.

  • Ed2010 reports that “AOL Living, AOL Food, and AOL Stylelist are seeking fall interns to work up to 25 hours/week. … This paid internship requires that the candidate be enrolled in a degree-granting program, and interns can choose flexible hours based on class schedules. Please send resume, cover letter and clips to dori.fern@corp.aol.com.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext