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Posts Tagged ‘Mike Gravel’

Morning Reading List, 02.22.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • Most of you don’t know a journo cheating on his/her spouse, but just barely.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A reader tells us, “There has been no mention of the fact that Marilyn Thompson left the NYT in protest over them not running the McCain story. She is now back at the Washington Post. Wheels within wheels.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Check out CQ’s video “Losing Pretty or Winning Ugly” where Craig Crawford gives his take on what Hillary Clinton’s options are going forward, and some wrestling moves are in the forecast.

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “The public remains highly engaged in the presidential campaign, and strong majorities say the campaign is important, easy to follow, interesting and informative. Relatively few Americans (28%) say the campaign has been too negative thus far. Two-thirds (66%) say it has not been too negative. By comparison, nearly half of the public (47%) found the campaign to be too negative at a comparable point in the 2004 election.”

  • Scripps Howard Foundation Names Judges for Annual Journalism Awards

  • A reader asks, “Oh, Posties … did you get your Diaz-Balarts confused? Today’s ‘In the Loop’ Washington Post pg A13 Photo of Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart with caption — ‘Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart still considers Fidel Castro a threat’. Then a quote from Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart — ‘We’ve been waiting, hoping for the moment of Castro’s death …’ So, who was it? Okay, let’s take it from the top: Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R–FL–21st) Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R–FL–25th) Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D–CA–47th) Rep. Linda Sanchez (D–CA–39th).”

  • TVNewser has a round-up for FBNY’s reporting on The New York Times story on John McCain’s relationship with Telecom lobbyist Vicki Iseman.

  • Romenesko also has a round-up of NYT related chatter from MSNBC’s First Read, WashingtonPost.com and Horse’s Mouth.

  • And, Wonkette asks, “Why Did The Times Publish This Funny Story About John McCain’s Sex Affairs?”

  • Mark your calendars! Len Downie will be on the Q&A Café April 10.

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox News Channel finished as the fourth most-watched basic cable news channel in prime time last week, after USA, TNT and TBS. This was the sixth week in a row that FNC has finished in the top 5. CNN finished at #20 while MSNBC was #28. This comes one week after Super Tuesday, when FNC finished at #3, CNN was #8 and MSNBC was #26 in prime time. Only CNN saw a significant drop week-to-week. FNC also ranked in seventh place in the total day, with CNN (#23) and MSNBC (#29) trailing for the week.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comcast shares have been on the upswing since last week when the firm unveiled a dividend, but at least one analyst thinks the run-up has gone too far. The dividend and a stock-buyback update ‘were positive developments, but they have little to do with valuation or fundamentals, yet the stock is up 15% since the earnings report,’ Credit Suisse analyst Bryan Kraft said in downgrading the cable giant’s stock from ‘outperform’ to ‘neutral.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “PBS viewers have spoken. Thousands of them. It was on February 17 that a story by the The New York Times’ Charles McGrath asked Is PBS Still Necessary?. ‘There are not only countless more channels to chose from now,’ McGrath wrote, ‘but many offer the kind of stuff that in the past you could see only on public TV, and in at least some instances they do it better.’ Public response was fierce, with readers posting hundreds of comments online at the Times. PBS’ Jim Lehrer mentioned the article on The NewsHour, inviting viewers to share their thoughts. A NewsHour spokesperson tells TVNewser that the program has received, to date, almost 5,000 comments via phone, email, and online postings.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “News Networks Bump Clinton Out of Picture”

  • TVNewser warns,Anderson Cooper Better Watch Out For Mike Gravel

  • New York Post reports,Daryn Kagan’s ‘Breaking the Curse’ won the 2008 Gracie Award for Outstanding Documentary. It aired on PBS.”

  • O’Reilly Unintentionally Questions Whether FNC is ‘Responsible News Agency,’” reports TVNewser.

  • Up next Thursday on WETA’s Author, Author! is Jane Austen panel discussion with Carol Pippen, Professor of English at Goucher College and editor of the Jane Austen Society of North America newsletter. Text interviews with Laurie Viera Rigler (Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict), Margaret Sullivan (The Jane Austen Handbook) and Syrie James (The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen).

  • FCC Relaxes Digital-TV Transition Order

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • “Due to an overwhelming amount of requests, the final EPpy Awards entries deadline has been extended to Friday, February 29th”

  • Adotas reports, “Perhaps the death of newspapers has been greatly exaggerated. It seems website audiences are actually growing, Scarborough Research, a newspaper audience ratings service reports.”

  • NMA reports, “Facebook has suffered its first ever drop in unique users after 17 months of growth. The figures from Nielsen Online revealed a 5% drop in UK numbers between December 2007 and January 2008.”

  • Wonkette reports,Helen Thomas Still Hates Bush, Loves (John) Kennedy

  • The New York Observer reports, “In the spring of 2005, when asked about Arianna Huffington’s plan to launch a news-aggregating blog to compete with the Drudge Report, Matthew Drudge did not seem too impressed. … It took a while, and surely the brighter prospects on the left side of the aisle have changed things since Mr. Drudge was acting as the steam vent for a country fed up with the Clinton White House. But, nearly three years into its existence, Huffingtonpost.com is getting there, with unique visitors logging on at three times the rate they did just six months ago.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Time Managing Editor Rick Stengel asks, “Should Newspapers Still Be Taking Sides?”

  • Reuters reports, “Reed Elsevier announced the acquisition of U.S. risk-management business ChoicePoint Inc for $4.1 billion, including debt, and said it would intensify a cost-saving drive and sell an advertising-dependent information business.”

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    RADIO

  • Tony Snow accepts job with O’Reilly.”

  • Radio Business Report reports, “Fox News Radio fed the press pool this time down in Africa for President Bush’s visit this week. But in Tanzania, there are no ISDN lines. Fox News found a solution and was able to transmit the broadcasts over the Internet and provide that ability to the other networks-ABC, AP, CBS, NPR and VOA. This is the first time that a network news pool had access to an internet transmission.”

  • DOJ Merger Decision Shadows XM, Sirius

  • Huffington Post’s Sam Stein reports, “Air America, one of the country’s more powerful radio networks and a major progressive megaphone, is switching ownership.”

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    JOBS

  • Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America is looking for a Business Writer/Editor.

  • A DC-based website is looking for an Editor-in-Chief. The site deals with the personalities, business and news of Washington. The Editor-in-Chief will oversee the entire editorial process from story assignment to publication for 7+ electronic newsletters. News experience and a sense of humor are a must and knowledge of one or more of the following local business communities is desirable: commercial real estate, legal, technology/government contracting, trade association, finance, and medical. For more info, contact KDSearch.com

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning More Like Noon Reading List, 01.04.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

    We blame Iowa for the delay.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Post reported yesterday, “Discovery Communications will announce today that company veteran Mark Hollinger will be promoted to the newly created job of chief operating officer, wrapping up a frenetic year of reorganization, acquisitions and layoffs at the Silver Spring cable television network.”

  • A release announced, “Macon Morehouse has joined the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) Department of Federal Affairs as an assistant director. She will be responsible for media relations and lobbying on issues such as Internet safety and the impact of advertising on children.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • LA Observed reports, “Times publisher David Hiller has let staffers know that he was back home for the holidays but has returned here refreshed and ready to carry out the Sam Zell agenda. Turns out Zell gets credit (or blame) for the banners hung inside the Times building that staffers have been rolling their eyes over.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the first time in polls since 1996, this ABC News/Facebook survey finds the Internet rivaling newspapers as one of Americans’ top two sources of news about the presidential election. It’s also the only election news source to show growth, doubling since 2000. One reason is the Internet’s advance overall: Seventy-three percent of adults now go online, the most in polls since the dawn of the Internet age. Forty percent use the Internet specifically for news and information about politics and the election, surpassing the previous high, 35 percent in a 2004 survey.” Check out the full analysis and results.

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Pearson, the owner of the Financial Times, has boosted the newspaper’s US-based news operation by purchasing an American site offering news and commentary on the money management industry. Money-Media, bought from its sole shareholder and CEO Michael Griffin, offers live news services on the American world of ‘high-net worth’ asset management and mutual fund trustees. Its Agenda section claims to be ‘the most influential source of intelligence for today’s corporate directors’.”

  • The National Legal and Policy Center reports, “The long-term decline in newspaper circulation presents the conservative movement with an excellent opportunity to increase its influence with the media. Falling readership and tighter budgets are forcing newspapers to dedicate fewer staff to investigative reporting. As a result, they are increasingly relying upon nonprofit organizations to fill the gap. A 2005 Arizona State University study found that 37 percent of the 100 leading daily newspapers had no full-time investigative reporters.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Paul Steiger thinks there’s a possibility Bloomberg LP and The New York Times Co. could merge sometime after the election, assuming Mike Bloomberg doesn’t win the presidency. Jim Cramer agrees.”

  • Secrecy News reports, “On December 31 President Bush signed into law the “Openness Promotes Effectiveness in our National (OPEN) Government Act of 2007,” which amends the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). The new law makes several constructive procedural changes in the FOIA to encourage faster agency response times, to enable requesters to track the status of their requests, to expand the basis for fee waivers, and more.”

  • The Examiner reports, “Redskins coverage Sleepless in Seattle, Billich gets his TV job when he wants it, Playoff Preview”

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “It’s a very big win for Barack Obama, in part because he knocked off the former first lady and in part because the media have been hankering to write the upset story. But remember all the pundits taking Hillary Clinton’s inevitability for granted most of the year, and despairing during the summer and fall that Obama could never catch up because he wasn’t pummeling her? He never hammered Hillary all that hard, and he still caught up.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “CNBC, First in Business Worldwide,
    had robust ratings growth in 2007 and had its best year in Business Day programming (5 AM-7 PM ET) since 2003 in the key demographic of adults 25-54. In total viewers, CNBC had its best year since 2002.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser has learned the CBS News blog PublicEye, once described as a “de facto ombudsman” of CBS News, has ceased operations. CBS Interactive cut several staff members last month, including Matthew Felling who was editor of the site. A spokesperson for CBS Interactive tells TVNewser, ‘We weren’t able to find a sustainable business model for Public Eye. We are exploring ways to maintain a similar spirit of public discourse by engaging the CBSNews.com audience and building a community around multiple voices.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The Writers Guild of America said it will picket the Golden Globe Awards, rejecting a call by the show’s owners to let a scripted show air on Jan. 13 without protests.”

  • Silicon Valley Insider reports, “We know several people who watch the Fox Business Network, but that’s because all of them appear on the newly launched cable channel from time to time. The rest of America, it seems, is soundly ignoring News Corp.’s newest offering: Nielsen says an average of 6,300 people a day watched FBN in the first two months of its launch last fall — a little more than 2% of CNBC’s audience of 283,000.”

  • DCRTV reports, “The still relatively new French ambassador to the US, Pierre Vimont, will be the guest on “The Q&A Cafe With Carol Joynt” on 2/7. It will air on NewsChannel 8 that weekend and DC Cable the following Friday. The cafe begins its new season next week with syndicated columnist Robert Novak”

  • The AP reports, “ABC News is eliminating Republican presidential candidate Duncan Hunter and Democrats Dennis Kucinich and Mike Gravel from its prime- time presidential debates Saturday night because they did not meet benchmarks for their support.”

  • Brian Stelter takes New York Times readers “Inside CNN’s Control Room, Balancing Projections With Patience”

  • TVNewser reports,Shepard Smith, talking with Greta Van Susteren and Susan Estrich went there during the late-night coverage of the Iowa caucuses. Smith was talking about Rep. Ron Paul’s 10% support from caucus-goers. ‘More than double’ what Rudy Giuliani got, Smith said. Then he asked the question: ‘Should Fox News reconsider’ and allow Paul in the GOP forum set for Sunday night?”

  • Also from DCRTV: “Landmark Communications, the parent company of the Annapolis Capital and the Bowie Blade-News newspapers, is exploring a possible sale of its businesses. That’s according to the Virginian-Pilot, the flagship newspaper of Norfolk-based Landmark, which owns a batch of media properties, including The Weather Channel”

  • The New York Observer reports, “When Jim Stewart stepped down from CBS News in November 2006 after some 16 years of reporting on a range of topics for the Tiffany Network, the longtime Washington-based correspondent retired to the warmth of Florida. Now, depending on a judge’s ruling in an ongoing case, Mr. Stewart could be spending a part of his golden years in a much less sunny position—namely in contempt of a federal court.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “Television’s late-night impresarios burst back on the air Wednesday after a forced two-month hiatus, expressing support for the striking writers even though several of the hosts crossed the picket line to resume their shows.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Wednesday was not just the first trading day of the year. It was also the first working day for Jeffrey Bewkes in his role as the new chief executive of media octopus Time Warner. Mr. Bewkes’s move to the C.E.O. chair, recently occupied by Richard Parsons, comes amid rampant chatter about whether he might decide to sell some of Time Warner’s parts, such as AOL or its publishing arm. Much of this speculation is old. And so far, Mr. Bewkes hasn’t tipped his hand. But in a report Wednesday, an analyst from UBS sounded skeptical that a sale would come soon and argued that such a move might not add much value anyway.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • “On Saturday, January 5, 2008 — only two days after the critical Iowa caucuses and three days before the first in the nation New Hampshire primary — ABC News, Facebook, and ABC affiliate WMUR will team up for a historic debate night.” For more details, click here.

  • Eat The Press reports, “TVNewser has the confirm: CBS’ Public Eye Blog is no more (seriously, look for it — it’s gone from the list of blogs). After last month’s round of layoffs at CBS (joyeux noel!), we wondered if that meant ‘Bye to the Eye.’ We’d asked CBS interactive spokesperson Dana McClintock who specifically denied that Public Eye was being eliminated and claimed that political reporter (and former PubEye co-editor) Brian Montopoli would be taking Felling’s spot.”

  • The Boston Herald reports, “Back in 2004, YouTube, the Internet-based video-sharing site, hadn’t been created. Now, the site, and the millions of the videos posted on it, has a coveted, influential spot in the current presidential campaign. On Monday night, the site and its owner, Google, plan on celebrating that role, by hosting an epic bash for all the reporters and photographers who are working the campaign trail. The party will be held at a Manchester, N.H., science center, the night before the state’s voters winnow down the list of presidential candidates.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “A new study found that many uses of copyrighted material in online video, including mash-ups and satire, are legal and could be endangered by new censorship practices.”

  • Based on the number of anonymous tips we’ve received, you’ve picked up on a change on Wonkette’s masthead. Ken Layne is no managing editor and John Clarke, Jr. has left the website.

  • Kara Swisher shares, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Learned to Love the Blog: Goodbye Dead Trees!”

  • CyberJournalist.net reports, “Citizen journalism dominates online news in 2007″

  • Jon Friedman tell us, “How the media let us down at the Iowa caucus”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Less than three months after its much-ballyhooed launch, Fox Business Network is drawing an average of 6,000 daytime viewers. The Nielsen number, for the period Oct. 15 through Dec. 16, rises to 15,000 during prime time. Taken in isolation, the debut might be judged an abysmal failure. But no one — including Fox executives — expected the fledgling channel to make a serious run at the top business network, CNBC, until it had been on the air for at least a year.”

  • Eat The Press represents, “More Media Winners, Iowa Edition”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Age reports, “Time Inc to challenge Soeharto’s $125 million libel win”

  • A tipster tells us, “Sonny Bunch from Weekly Standard also sporting a ‘strike beard’”

  • Business Week reports, “As if media companies didn’t already have enough going on, now they have something else to look forward to in 2008: scarcity. I don’t mean the ‘scarcity’ media knew in easier times, back when owning printing presses or broadcast towers gave you a stranglehold on distribution, back when there was no newfangled noisy megaphone—the Internet—through which those whom traditionalists call ‘nonprofessionals’ could broadcast their own media.”

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    RADIO

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. government antitrust lawyers have spent nearly 10 months so far investigating Sirius Satellite Radio Inc’s plan to acquire rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc, despite company hopes that the deal would be approved by the end of 2007.”

  • Matthew Felling to the The Kojo Nnamdi Show on NPR next Monday and Tuesday.

  • UPI reports, “For the first time, a national radio station will be devoted to the U.S. presidential race 24 hours a day, seven days a week, XM Satellite Radio said.”

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    JOBS

  • US News & World Report is looking for a Manager, Audience and Business Development: Health and a Manager, Audience & Business Development: Money

  • The Development Executive Group is looking for an Editor for Leading International Dev’t Website.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a
    Public Relations Coordinator.

  • Allison & Partners is looking for a Senior Account Executive and Account Manager.

  • Virilion is looking for a Copywriter.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Afternoon Roundup

  • Tourney pools are cool.

  • The Post’s Elizabeth Williamson goes there.

  • Find out more about that PR Newswire “Pitching National Media” event here.

  • More on a potential Rome Hartman move to D.C.

  • An ABC release announced that the fifth installment of the Emmy Award-winning series “Iraq: Where Things Stand,” ABC News will report extensively on how the country and its people are faring four years after the US-led invasion. The show will begin airing across ABC News’ broadcasts and platforms beginning Sunday, March 18.

  • Patricia Cohen reports that to bridge the gender gap on the op-ed pages, Catherine Orenstein “has been training women at universities, foundations and corporations to write essays and get them published.”

  • Jonathan Kaplan reports that Democratic Caucus chairman Rahm Emanuel “has told new Democratic members of Congress to steer clear of Stephen Colbert, or at least his satirical Comedy Central program, ‘The Colbert Report.’”

  • The Reliable Source ladies report that the BBC was had by a fake Patrick Fitzgerald blog.

  • A reader writes in on this, “Some of us out here in Journalismland believe that the comments should remain just as they’re written at the end of Post stories–it’s called freedom of speech and non-censorship. I think some more liberal Post writers probably get upset because many of the comments tear apart and rip to shreds and bring back to reality some of the articles that are obviously more liberal-leaning, and some of them can be pretty liberal-leaning, let’s face it. The comments represent all views, they represent reality, and they provide a great feedback from the real world to some of these stories, which sometimes appear written by guys who aren’t exactly in tune with many aspects of the real world. The comments should stay!”

  • Washington Gardener Magazine is hosting the first annual photo contest exhibition in downtown Silver Spring, MD. The opening reception is Friday, March 23 from 7-9pm at the Adams Bank Lobby in the World Building on Georgia Avenue in downtown Silver Spring, MD. The reception is open to the public and is free to attend. After the opening, you may come by and view the photos any time during the normal bank lobby hours (M-F 9am-4pm, Sat 9am-12noon). The show runs through May 25.

  • AP reports, “Turner Broadcasting will rename its Court TV channel to reflect a more action-driven lineup. The new name will not be revealed until summer and will take effect at the start of next year. What is now Court TV will become the home to a form of action-oriented reality programming.”

  • PBS reports that the Project for Excellence in Journalism
    “plans to start a Blogger Index, which will survey several hundred blogs for quality of content and topic areas.” “The landscape is changing so rapidly,” says PEJ director Tom Rosenstiel. “The term ‘blog’ might be obsolete.”

  • His Extremeness has the real news from yesterday’s White House briefing.

  • DCist reports, “Local NPR station WETA-FM recently completely reversed course a second time, switching back to a classical format after two unsatisfactory years as a news station.” And listeners are offering to help out with CD donations.

  • NRO’s Bruce Bartlett notes, “If, as I believe, the major media tilted left and have moved toward the center, then this means they moved to the right. It is this movement that the left has picked up on and is complaining about. But the idea that the media now tilt toward conservatives is absurd.”

  • Drudge reports that CNN “has barred former U.S. Senator Mike Gravel from their New Hampshire debate, without giving a reason. … This decision calls into question media censorship and goes against a fundamental American belief in ‘Fairness,’ which is especially critical in the political process.”

  • B&C reports, “The Radio-Television News Directors Association Wednesday praised passage of a bill (HR 1309) that strengthens the Freedom of Information Act.”

  • A Zogby poll shows, “The vast majority of American voters believe media bias is alive and well — 83% of likely voters said the media is biased in one direction or another, while just 11% believe the media doesn’t take political sides.”

  • The AP reports, “Advertising revenues at U.S. newspapers edged down 0.3 percent last year as gains in online revenues weren’t enough to compensate for a worsening downturn in print ads.”

  • Julie Mason has no one to play with.

  • Taking Out The Trash, 02.02.07

  • This is the one time of year commercials get some love.
  • C-SPAN reports that New York Times Baghdad correspondent John Burns confirms that he’ll remain in Iraq until mid-summer before moving to London to become bureau chief. Burns confirmed it during a taping of Q & A on Friday.
  • In his online chat today, Jonathan Weisman notes, “Reporters on television — and in on-line chats — put themselves into a perilous place. We are supposed to keep our opinions ourselves, and at the same time, be engaging and fun. That said Tom Ricks’ book Fiasco definitely takes a strong point of view, backed up extensively by facts, and no one has jumped
    on him.” (Hat Tip: Romenesko)

  • Julie Mason reports, “A suspcious package prompted the evacuation of the press corps’ temporary White House press room on Jackson Place this morning. A dog apparently sniffed out some explosives in a car parked nearby.” Don’t worry. It was a false alarm.
  • This weekend on C-SPAN2, Book TV will air an “Encore Booknotes” program with columnist Molly Ivins. In 1998, C-SPAN’s Brian Lamb interviewed Ivins about her latest book, “You Got to Dance With Them What Brung You: Politics in the Clinton Years” for the award-winning author interview series “Booknotes.” The interview airs on Saturday at 1:15 pm ET and Sunday at 9:30 a.m ET.
  • RockCritics.com’s Jason Gross picks his best music writing for 2006. Among the winners are the Washington Post’s Philip Kennicott and Hank Stuever. Somewhere, Josh du Lac quietly weeps…and not over concerns that his name isn’t as cool as Russ McCracken’s.

    Lots more below…

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