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Editors

Publishing for Vision & Hearing Hosts Charity Auction

Literary agent Irene Goodman founded a nonprofit called Publishing for Vision & Hearing (PubVH) in honor of her son, Rob, who suffers from Usher Syndrome.

Currently, PubVH is hosting a charity auction.

Those who are interested can place their bids until the end of December. Some of the items up for grabs include a picture book critique by veteran editor Nancy Paulsen (who now presides over her own imprint at Penguin Young Readers Group) and a partial critique by Movable Type Management co-founder/president Jason Ashlock.

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Anne Hoppe to Move to Clarion Books

Anne Hoppe will be moving from HarperCollins Children’s Books to Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Children’s Book Group.

Hoppe spent 18 years at HarperCollins. She will begin in her new role as senior executive editor starting January 23, 2013.

Some of the authors on her list include When I Grow Up author “Weird Al” YankovicDiscworld series author Sir Terry Pratchett, Carnival of Souls author Melissa Marr and Animorphs series author Katherine Applegate. In a past interview, Yankovic talked about how he and Hoppe came together for his debut picture book project.

Pitch Your Fiction to Manhattan

After a somewhat rough start, Manhattan is starting to “hit its stride,” says EIC Cristina Cuomo. The pub, which launched in the midst of the financial crisis, is unlike other city mags since it’s more like a national book with local flavor. And Cuomo, whose first issue with the pub was September’s, is on a mission to “give the magazine a personality and a sense of humor.”

Among her changes? A new section called “The Fictionist,” which welcomes anyone with literary chops be they veteran or newbie authors. Writers can pitch short stories or book excerpts.

For more info, read How To Pitch: Manhattan. [subscription required]

Carolrhoda Books Seeks Unagented YA Manuscripts for Limited Time

Lerner Publishing Group’s Carolrhoda Books occasionally accepts unagented submissions. According to editorial director Andrew Karre, the publisher will take young-adult manuscripts from October 1st until October 31st.

Follow this link to read all the details and Karre’s instructions. Karre added that he does not like university-aged protagonists, manuscripts that exceeds 100,000 words or books that “have series potential.” He prefers projects that feature unusual people, unfamiliar mythologies and doomed romance.

Karre included three tips for authors: “Things I require: That you follow my submission guidelines. That your cover letter be very brief and you not agonize over it for more than twenty minutes. Your extreme patience. I’m slow. I often return to manuscripts several times before I make a decision.”

Why Self-Published Authors Need Editors

As the number of self-published books grows, indie authors need editors more than ever. Kirkus Reviews launched new editorial services this year, one way for self-published authors to polish their work.

In this encore edition of the Morning Media Menu podcast, we spoke with Kirkus editorial director Perry Crowe about these new offerings. Press play below to listen…

Crowe explained: “Having been the indie editor at Kirkus and seeing lots and lots of self published books, I’ve seen some very basic mistakes–like confusing different versions of their/there/they’re and punctuation issues.  There are simple things that need to be caught because it jars the reader out of the reading experience.”

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NYT Magazine Editor Shares Tips for Freelance Writers

On Twitter today, New York Times Magazine culture editor Adam Sternbergh offered advice for freelance writers–an invaluable peek inside the mind of an editor.

To help all the freelance writers in the audience, we’ve collected his advice into a handy Storify post below…

If you want to see all the responses generated by his posts, you can check out the #BetterFreelancer hashtag on Twitter. For all the editors in the audience, Sternbergh also started a #BetterEditor hashtag. (Via The Awl)

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Kirkus Launches Editing Division For Self-Published Authors

Kirkus has launched a new book editing division. The new service will provide editing, copyediting, proofreading and copywriting services for unpublished and self-published authors.

The book editing division follows the success of Kirkus Indie, the company’s review program for self-publishers. Meg Kuehn, COO of Kirkus explained in the release: “Offering book editing services is a natural extension of our brand. We’ve been notorious for our high editorial standards for decades, and our success working with independent authors in the Kirkus Indie program paved the way for new author services that serve this fast-growing segment of the industry.”

Editors looking to participate in the Kirkus program must have experience working at a big six publisher or at an “award-winning” independent press such as Graywolf, Kensington or Abrams.

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Jamie Raab Interview Sparks eBook Royalty Debate

GalleyCat contributor Jeff Rivera interviewed Grand Central publisher Jamie Raab for mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? feature today.

In the interview, Raab (pictured, via) defended her imprint’s standard practice of giving authors a 25% royalty rate for eBooks: “We have an infrastructure to support.” She outlined the values of what traditional publishers have to offer whether they are new in their writing career or established New York Times bestselling authors.

When asked on whether or not she fears big-name writers will take a less traditional publishing route, she replied: “I think about that a lot because I know it’s on authors’ minds. And I think it’s incumbent on every publisher to do a better job than they’ve ever done before — more creative on marketing and eBooks, working in partnership more closely with their authors, keeping them in the loop, publishing more strategically.”

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What do Editors Want in 2012?

As writers carry out their new year’s resolutions to revise their manuscripts, they have to be wondering: what do editors want this year?

The Andrew Lownie Literary Agency, a London-based company, has decided to ask that question to twenty different editors. His list included HarperCollins associate publisher Myles Archibald, Random House publisher Trevor Dolby, Penguin Press/Particular Books editorial director Georgina Laycock, Little, Brown publisher David Shelley and Bantam Press/Doubleday publishing director Susanna Wadeson.

Here’s more from Archibald at HarperCollins: “Ideas or stories with a strong, interesting narrative structure is essential for all media and is what non-fiction now needs. It is also interesting that non-fiction works well with broad subjects, or very specific, illuminating stories. Finally, it is striking how stories that seem to have waned from people’s memories can have a massive resurgence – so perhaps new takes on old stories might be a vein to mine.”

Joy Peskin Jumps to FSG Books for Young Readers

Joy Peskin has been named vice president and editorial director of Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers.

Peskin established her children’s publishing career while working at Penguin Books for Young Readers and Scholastic. Prior to this move, she served as associate publisher at Viking Children’s Books. At Penguin, she worked with Speak author Laurie Halse Anderson, After author Amy Efaw and Looks author Madeleine George.

FSG Books for Young Readers publisher Simon Boughton had this statement at Publishers Weekly: “At a time of great change, success is still built on a fundamental love of and ability to find and publish great stories—and Joy is both a savvy businesswoman and an editor with a great love of the book. Her outlook and vision are an ideal match for FSG; she’ll bring new authors and new vitality to a great program. I’m very excited for the imprint’s future under her direction.”

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