FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Lecture Circuit

Kansas City Library’s Epic Parking Garage

KC Library.jpg

The most epic of parking garages is located in the downtown Kansas City area. “The Community Bookshelf” features giant-sized spines of several great books including Joseph Heller‘s Catch-22, Plato‘s Republic, Ray Bradbury‘s Fahrenheit 451, Ralph Ellison‘s Invisible Man, and E.B. White‘s Charlotte’s Web.

According to the official website: “It runs along the south wall of the Central Library’s parking garage on 10th Street between Wyandotte Street and Baltimore Avenue. The book spines, which measure approximately 25 feet by 9 feet, are made of signboard mylar. The shelf showcases 22 titles reflecting a wide variety of reading interests as suggested by Kansas City readers and then selected by The Kansas City Public Library Board of Trustees.”

Answer this: If you had to pick an epic book worthy of a giant manifestation, which one would it be? For this GalleyCat correspondent it would be Mitch Albom‘s Tuesdays with Morrie because it made me cry giant tears.

How Novelist Alix Strauss Developed a Hotel Book Tour

alix.jpgWhile building her book tour, one writer decided to add hotel stops to the list of bookstores and book clubs she would visit–complete with hotel-themed promotions.

Today’s guest on the Morning Media Menu was Alix Strauss, author of the novel, Based Upon Availability. She shared tips for connecting with book clubs and explained why she targeted hotels for her book tour.

Strauss explained: “[My] outreach was something that matched the book … For Based Upon Availability (which is about eight women who pass through the doors of the Four Seasons hotel) my thinking was–let’s reach out to the hotels. It’s a great way for me to promote this novel in a venue that matches the theme.”

Read more

JetBlue Launches All You Can Jet Pass: Time for an Impromptu Book Tour?

jetbluejet.jpgFrom September 7, 2010 until October 6, 2010, JetBlue is offering a special All You Can Jet Pass–perhaps the perfect time to launch a book tour?

The airline is offering two passes: a $699 pass for 30 days of unlimited travel seven days a week and a $499 pass for 30 days of unlimited travel except for Fridays and Sundays. Here’s more from the post: “Use your AYCJ Pass for business, for pleasure, to visit your favorite cities or to meet with a client. You might as well just do it all. With more than 60 cities to choose from … it’s a deal you can’t pass up.”

If you do end up using JetBlue to mount an impromptu book tour, email GalleyCat. We’d love to hear your story.

SXSW 2011 Publishing Panel Voting

panelpick.jpgAs we near the end of a long and lazy summer, the publishing world is already plotting panel discussion ideas for next year.

Readers, writers, and publishing professionals can all help program the SXSW Interactive festival for March 2011–you can vote through the festival’s innovative SXSW Interactive PanelPicker.

To help you vote, eBookNewser has rounded up the entire publishing-related slate of panel discussions.

Click here to read part one.
Click here to read part two.

We’ve included a sample below, choosing a panel with a particularly provocative title.

Kill The Publisher: Independent eBooks Liberate Content Creators, suggested by David Schloss, Mac Create, Inc.
“Since the time of Guttenberg’s press, the power–and the money–has gone to those who publish books, not to the creatives themselves. As the big book publishers grapple with the shift from analog to digital distribution they have cried that ‘the book is dead.’ The book is very much alive, it’s the bloated, bottom-feeding print publishers that are dying. This session will show you you can take well-crafted, targeted content and make it available on the Apple iBookstore and Kindle marketplace to reach readers that publishers couldn’t reach at speeds they can’t imagine.”

Margaret Atwood and Jay McInerney Deliver Graduation Speeches

Over at the New Yorker, Book Bench has been collecting 2010 commencement speeches delivered by novelists. They link to the complete speeches, but choose the juiciest quotes in specific categories like “Why Writing Is Like Life” and “Requisite Platitude.”

Read the whole post here, but here is a bit of gloomy advice from Jay McInerney: “the last four years might well be, for some time to come, the high-water mark in your early life.”

And here is a moment of “Humility/Coy Self-Promotion” from the great Margaret Atwood : “For who but a warty person–or, to put it in more romantic terms, one who has visited the shadow side–would have written two fun-filled, joke-packed novels about the almost total annihilation of the human race? I didn’t get any literary awards for those.”

(In lieu of an author photo, we’ve included a video of Atwood’s role in Score: A Hockey Musical)

Jon Stewart Exposes the Problem with Literary Readings

9780446579223_154x233.jpgAt a BookExpo America speech yesterday, author and television host Jon Stewart exposed a common problem that plagues literary readings: long-winded questions from the audience.

New York magazine reporter Boris Kachka wrote about the event, capturing the key moment: “‘Do you have a question,’ Stewart slowly groaned into the mike at one long-winded guest. ‘You’re killing us.’ After a few more questions, he said, ‘Does anyone have a question where we don’t end up having to help you people? Is anyone here okay with what’s going on at this point in their careers, and maybe just curious about the s*** we do?’”

This GalleyCat editor can think of plenty of readings ruined by painful questions. Share your worst long-winded reading question in the comments–we’ll round them up in a future post.

GalleyCat on Kari Moran’s BookRadio Show: “All About E”

bookradioshow.pngLast weekend, this GalleyCat editor joined radio host Kari Moran once again for her BookRadio Show. Tune in every Sunday at 3 pm PST for our “All About E” segment.

While the show airs on Los Angeles CBS-owned stations KFWB NEWS TALK 980, you can listen to the whole show online. Among the many topics discussed during the hour-long broadcast, we focused on Open Road Media’s work with the digital backlist of novelist William Styron and the future of digital rights. Follow this link to listen.

Last week’s episode featured Occult America: The Secret History of How Mysticism Shaped Our Nation by Mitch Horowitz and The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood, and Side By Side by Dr. Charles Sophy.

Literary Remix Theory: Booked

monsters.jpgAs our literary remix contest continues this week, two mash-up experts will talk about their re-imaginings of a Louisa May Alcott novel. Tomorrow night (May 6th) Little Vampire Women co-author Lynn Messina and Little Women and Werewolves co-author Porter Grand will talk about this new literary genre.

At the Monster Throwdown event, they will discuss mash-ups with Pulitzer Prize winning biographer John Matteson–author of Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father. The show starts at 7:00 p.m. at the Leonard Nimoy Thalia Theater at Symphony Space (2537 Broadway at 95th Street). Former GalleyCat editor Ron Hogan will kick off the discussion.

Here’s more from the release: “The discussion will explore their mash-ups of Alcott’s classic, Little Women. Both authors will address the challenges they faced reworking the text. Alcott’s own work, published under various pseudonyms, included many sensational elements such as spies, murderers, drug addicts and mummies, and Matteson will explore whether inserting vampires and werewolves into the beloved story would be truly anathema to the author.”

Christopher Hitchens and Salman Rushdie in Conversation

One afternoon after a botched bombing attempt in Times Square, Christopher Hitchens and Salman Rushdie–two writers who have served as lightening rods for intellectual controversy and extremist anger–concluded the PEN World Voices Festival with a conversation about tyranny’s effect on writers.

PEN filmed the event, but you can get a sneak peek at the proceedings in the GalleyCat video embedded above. Hitchens opened the annual Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture by urging Americans not to be stalled by terrorist threats: “Somebody told me this evening that perhaps attendance was down at this event because of an attempted atrocity in Times Square. If that was true, I would both be depressed and I would take it as an opportunity to align what I want to talk about…the contagion of fear.”

The two writers discussed the impact of the Iranian Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini’s fatwa–a religious death sentence issued against the novelist in 1989. During a conversation with Hitchens after the lecture, Rushdie reminded the audience that he was still alive while Khomeini had died. “Don’t mess with novelists!” laughed Rushdie.

Salman Rushdie Opens PEN World Voices Festival

PENfest2010.jpg“The [Icelandic] volcano was essentially a fan of literature,” said Salman Rushdie at the official opening of the sixth annual PEN World Voices Festival last night. “It relented in time and almost everyone made it to the festival.”

He also pointed to an empty chair beside the podium, a symbol of imprisoned and repressed writers around the globe, like imprisoned Burmese blogger Nay Phone Latt. “The reason why this chair is here is to remind us there are writers who cannot be here–we should remember the absent writer,” Rushdie concluded.

The reading featured writers from around the globe reading in their native languages. Italian journalist Daniele Mastrogiacomo read a grim passage about his own kidnapping in Afghanistan. Alberto Ruy-Sanchez read a sexually-charged excerpt from his novel. Finnish-Estonian author Sofi Oksanen read from her debut novel Purge in a fierce and urgent pace. “The themes of the novel are quite hard,” she said. “And quite often readers have trouble sleeping.”

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>