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Statistics

Children Read an Average of 40 Minutes a Day

thefamiliesinmediaprojectChildren ages 2-10 are reading an average of 40 minutes per day, spending 29 minutes reading print, 8 minutes reading on computers, and 5 minutes reading on digital platforms, according to a new report from The Joan Ganz Cooney Center called Learning at Home.

For the study, the organization spoke to more than 1500 parents of 2-10 year olds across the country. According to the report, 62 percent of these kids have access to eReaders or tablets, but only 31 percent actually use these devices because their parents want them to read print books.

While reading is definitely an important part of a child’s day, TV dominates. The research revealed that  children spend an average of 42 minutes a day watching educational TV.

54% of eReading Kids Ask to Buy a Print Copy of an eBook They Already Own

dbwChildren’s adoption of eBooks is on the rise, and two-thirds of children 13 and under now report reading digital books, according to a new survey from Digital Book World and PlayCollective’s research arm, PlayScience. Among these young readers that read eBooks, 92 percent of them read a digital book every week.

The report is the final in a three-part study. The first of which came out last January and the second which was published in July 2013. The latest figures reveal that the daily and weekly reading of eBooks among this age group went up with 50 percent of 2-5 year olds that read eBooks do so daily. In addition, 44 percent of older kids that read eBooks do so daily.

According to the report, 48 percent of parents reported that their children have asked to purchase the print edition of an eBook that they have read or already own, with 54 percent requesting the print version of a book that they already own. Kids prefer reading on tablets, acceding to the study. Parents prefer to pay $3.50-9.oo for eBooks, and pay an average of $7.00 on eBooks for their kids.

50% of Americans Cite the Internet as Main Source of News: Pew

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Half of the American public now cites the Internet as its main channel for accessing national and international news, according to Pew Research. While the Internet as a news source grew since 2011, so too did television, and radio. Only newspapers suffered a drop.

This fact comes from an interesting list of end of the year data points about American culture  that Pew Research has put together. Among the news items, in 2013, for the first time ever, the majority of American adults owns a smartphone.

We are also living in an era in which the public widely distrusts the federal government. Here is more from the report: “For the first time, a majority of the public (53%) says that the federal government threatens their personal rights and freedoms.”

 

90% of Americans Said Library Closures Would Hurt Their Community: Pew Digital Library Report

pewNinety percent of Americans aged 16 and older said that if their local public library closed that it would impact their community, and 63 percent said that it would have a major impact.

These Americans say that libraries play an important role in their communities. In fact, ninety-five percent of these citizens said that the materials and resources available at public libraries are important in giving anyone the chance to succeed. In addition, 95 percent of those surveyed said that public libraries promote literacy and a love of reading. The report also found that majority of people (94 percent) report that the public library improves the quality of life in a community.

While most people love their library, only 34 percent of Americans aged 16 and older think that public libraries have not done a good job at staying up to date with technology. In fact, 55 percent of people said that libraries do not do a good job keeping up with technology.  In addition, more than half (52 percent) of Americans said that people don’t need public libraries as much as they used.

Almost 70% of Readers Will Not Abandon Print Books: Ricoh Study

ricohNearly 70 percent of consumers feel it is unlikely that they’ll give up on printed books by 2016, according to a new report from print company Ricoh and analyst firm IT Strategies with the University of Colorado at Boulder. The main reasons for preferring print are that these consumers like the look and feel of a real book, they don’t have to strain their eyes to read print and they like putting books on the bookshelf.

“The Evolution of the Book Industry: Implications for US Book Manufacturers and Printers”  report also revealed that college students prefer print textbooks to digital textbooks, for reasons of concentration. According to the report, respondents reported that a digital display is too distracting.

The study also claims that 60 percent of eBooks that are downloaded are not actually read. It did not include any metrics about how many print books are purchased and not read.

Reading Literary Fiction Improves Empathy: Study

theroundhouseReading literary fiction can improve empathy, according to a new report from researchers at The New School in New York City.

To conduct the study, the research team which included social psychologist Emanuele Castano and PhD candidate David Kidd, they divided up reading assignments to the participants. Different participants read different genres of books. After the test, they were given tests designed to measure their ability to understand someone else’s thoughts and feelings. Interestingly, there was a significant difference in the responses between literary- and genre-fiction readers and literary fiction readers proved to be more empathetic.

The Scientific American has the story:

When study participants read non-fiction or nothing, their results were unimpressive. When they read excerpts of genre fiction, such as Danielle Steel’s The Sins of the Mother, their test results were dually insignificant. However, when they read literary fiction, such as The Round House by Louise Erdrich, their test results improved markedly—and, by implication, so did their capacity for empathy.

Jobs Involving Intellectual Property Make Up 6% of US GDP: IIPA

iipaJobs involving intellectual property are helping to keep the U.S. economy thriving, according to a new report from the International Intellectual Property Alliance. The research revealed that copyright industries added more than $1 trillion in value to the U.S. economy in a year, and comprised more 6 percent of the total US GDP.

The report examined the economic impact of US industries made up of the creation, production, distribution and exhibition of copyright materials ranging from newspapers and books to TV, music and radio.

The report found that these industries included about 5.4 million jobs for US workers or about 5 percent of all private sector jobs. These jobs paid on average 33 percent more than other jobs, according to the study. In addition, the study also revealed that this is a growing field and grew an aggregate annual rate of 4.7 percent, which is pretty impressive since this is twice the rate of growth for the US economy, according to the report.

62% of Young Adults in the UK Prefer Print to eBooks: Voxburner

voxThe majority (62 percent) of 16-to-24 year-olds in the UK prefer print books to eBooks, according to a new report from Voxburner.

The report included responses from 1,420 participants who were surveyed them between September 25th and October 18th 2013.

The main reasons that the respondents prefer print are that print books are a good value, and that readers have an emotional connection to books. Fifty-one percent of participants said that they liked to hold the product. Twenty percent said that they are not restricted to a particular device. Ten percent responded that print is easier to share. Six percent said that they can sell a print book when they are done with it.

Interestingly, respondents picked books as the media they most prefer in print. Forty-percent of respondents said that they prefer physical copies of movies,  47 percent prefer print newspapers and magazines to digital, 32 percent prefer CDs to MP3s, and 31 percent of these young people prefer physical video games to digital ones. (Via The Guardian).

NSA Surveillance is Making Writers Self-Censor

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Eighty-five percent of writers are worried about government surveillance of Americans, and 73 percent reported that never have they been so worried about privacy rights and freedom of the press, according to a new report from Pen America.

The report found that writers are censoring themselves in order to avoid trouble with the NSA. The report found that 16 percent of writers have avoided writing or speaking about a particular topic due to concerns about the NSA.

In addition, the study revealed that 24 percent of writers have purposefully avoided certain topics on the phone or through email. And 28 percent of writers have avoided social media activities. Read more

Nielsen is Acquiring Bowker’s Business Intelligence

Nielsen has formed an agreement with R.R. Bowker to acquire Bowker’s Business Intelligence and Commerce Solutions products in a deal whose terms were not disclosed. The surprising move will allow Nielsen –the owner of Book Scan, BookData and BookNet — to provide both eBook and print data in one tool from one source.

Here is more from the press release:

Bowler’s industry-leading Business Intelligence and Commerce Solutions products will be integrated into Nielsen’s book portfolio upon completion of this acquisition. Nielsen will soon be able to measure the impact of eBook sales in the U.S. and UK and provide insights and trends around the volume and value of books sales by various demographic criteria. Nielsen will also be able to offer for the first time a B2B service that enables retailers to source and order books throughout the English-language book market. Read more

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