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Archives: March 2012

Harry Crews Has Died

Novelist Harry Crews has passed away. Above, we’ve embedded a YouTube video of the author talking to Dennis Miller about his time in the military, his E.E. Cummings-inspired tattoo and his Scar Lover novel.

He wrote many novels, including The Gospel Singer and A Feast of Snakes, but he also produced an extensive body of nonfiction work. You can explore the novelist’s prolific career at the Henry Crews Bibliography. Here’s an excerpt from an interview with Vice Magazine about his work as a writing teacher:

“Well, thank God the University of Florida gave me this deal that every writer needs. I worked with 10 or 12 graduate students a year. They were just young people who thought they wanted to be fiction writers. By and large, they fell in love with the idea of being a fiction writer and then they were introduced to the slave labor of it and they pretty soon decided, “No, I don’t want to do this.” … If you’re going to write a book, you don’t know what you’re looking at. You have to disabuse them of all these ideas they have that they are sure are right but which are almost exclusively, always, all of them, wrong.

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Cubes: Take a Behind-the-Scenes Tour of The Knot

In this episode of “Cubes,” we tour the offices of XO Group Inc., the media company best known for every bride-to-be’s favorite site, The Knot.

The XO Group’s brand-new space in lower Manhattan boasts a fashion runway, a bar with a kegerator, a giant projection screen for playing Xbox Kinect, and a staircase inspired by the ones found in Apple stores. Oh, and it has really good feng shui.

For more mediabistroTV videos, check out our YouTube channel, and be sure to follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

Interested in working at XO Group? Check out their postings on the Mediabistro job board.

Kurt Vonnegut Kindle Single & 50 Shades of History: Top Stories of the Week

For your weekend reading pleasure, here are our top stories of the week, including a Kurt Vonnegut Kindle Single, a Vogue essay book deal and some Fifty Shades of Grey online history.

Click here to sign up for GalleyCat’s daily email newsletter, getting all our publishing stories, book deal news, videos, podcasts, interviews, and writing advice in one place.

1. Controversial Vogue Essay Sparks Book Deal
2. The Lost History of Fifty Shades of Grey
3. NYT Magazine Editor Shares Tips for Freelance Writers
4. Chuck Palahniuk Survives Car Accident
5. Police Drop Criminal Investigation into Middle School Teacher Who Read ‘Ender’s Game’ in Class
6. Writing Advice from Anne Lamott
7. Amazon Kindle Store Glitch Temporarily Removed Buy Buttons
8. Kurt Vonnegut Gets a Kindle Single
9. The Hunger Games & Revolution
10. Occupy Wall Street Library Confiscated in Union Square

‘The Hunger Games’ Trilogy Has More Than 36.5 Million Copies In Print

Scholastic has printed more than 36.5 million copies of books in The Hunger Games trilogy in the United States alone. This includes more than 17.5 million copies of The Hunger Games, more than ten million copies of Catching Fire and more than nine million copies of Mockingjay.

The publisher shared the news as the movie version of the Suzanne Collins book made records at the box office. Collins herself praised the films, saying via Facebook, “I feel like the book and the film are individual yet complementary pieces that enhance one another.”

The film, which stars Jennifer Lawrence, Woody Harrelson, and Lenny Kravitz, brought in $155 million in ticket sales opening weekend, which according to The Washington Post, makes it No. 3 on the list of best opening weekend ticket sales (behind only Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 and The Dark Knight). The film’s soundtrack has also topped the Billboard charts.

Harlan Coben, Jonah Lehrer & R.J. Palacio Debut on the Indie Bestseller List

We’ve collected the books debuting on Indiebound’s Indie Bestseller List for the week ending March 25, 2012–a sneak peek at the books everybody will be talking about next month.

(Debuted at #1 in Hardcover Nonfiction) Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer: “From the bestselling author of How We Decide comes a sparkling and revelatory look at the new science of creativity. Shattering the myth of muses, higher powers, even creative ‘types,’ Jonah Lehrer demonstrates that creativity is not a single ‘gift’ possessed by the lucky few. It’s a variety of distinct thought processes that we can all learn to use more effectively.” (March 2012)

(Debuted at #3 in Hardcover Fiction) Stay Close by Harlan Coben: “Megan is a suburban soccer mom who once upon a time walked on the wild side. Now she’s got two kids, a perfect husband, a picket fence, and a growing sense of dissatisfaction. Ray used to be a talented documentary photographer, but at age forty he finds himself in a dead- end job posing as a paparazzo pandering to celebrity-obsessed rich kids. Jack is a detective who can’t let go of a cold case-a local husband and father disappeared seventeen years ago, and Jack spends the anniversary every year visiting a house frozen in time, the missing man’s family still waiting, his slippers left by the recliner as if he might show up any moment to step into them.” (March 2012)

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Amanda Hocking: ‘A lot of authors tend to over market’

GalleyCat contributor Jeff Rivera interviewed self-publishing success story Amanda Hocking for mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? feature.

When asked about why most writers who self-publish are not able to achieve what she has, she replied:

A lot of authors tend to over market or they don’t take criticisms very well. They think that their book is perfect. They don’t want to get bogged down with editing or covers, because they think their book is so good. Or they market too hard. All they do is talk about their book and nobody wants to hear, ‘Buy my book.’ They want to have a conversation with you … Also, new writers respond to negative reviews and have great catastrophic meltdowns. You can’t respond to reviews at all except to say ‘thank you for reading the book.’ That’s the best you can do; otherwise, you’re just going to look bad even if the reviewer is totally out of line.

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Four Book Bloggers Will Win Free Trip to BEA

To celebrate the role book bloggers play in the industry, Association of American Publishers members and Goodreads have teamed up for the Independent Book Blogger Awards.

Four bloggers will win a trip to BookExpo America (BEA) along with “free airfare and hotel accommodations and a pass to the three-day global gathering.” Bloggers can submit five examples of their best work to the contest; entries will be accepted from today until Monday, April 9th. Follow this link for contest details.

Check it out: “The contest is open to US-based bloggers, at least 18 years of age, who dedicate at least 75 percent of their blog’s written content to coverage of books and the industry and who have posted regularly from February 1, 2011 through February 1, 2012.  The blog cannot be affiliated with and not compensated by any commercial or academic publication, but may include those who blog for institutions such as libraries or bookstores with no commercial media ties. There are four categories for submissions:  Adult Fiction, Adult Non-Fiction, Children’s/Young adult and Industry News.  Entries will be judged on such qualities as writing, analysis, design and presentation and reader impact.”

Joel Stein Thinks ‘Adults Should Read Adult Books’

Time columnist and satirist Joel Stein baited the Internet with a controversial New York Times essay entitled “Adults Should Read Adult Books.” The piece compared adult readers who enjoy young adult fiction to “a guy on the plane looking at pornography on his computer.”

The debate has already generated hundreds of angry responses on Twitter. We’ve collected some of our favorite replies below–is it satire or not? Here is an excerpt from the curmudgeonly post:

I have no idea what “The Hunger Games” is like. Maybe there are complicated shades of good and evil in each character. Maybe there are Pynchonesque turns of phrase. Maybe it delves into issues of identity, self-justification and anomie that would make David Foster Wallace proud. I don’t know because it’s a book for kids. I’ll read “The Hunger Games” when I finish the previous 3,000 years of fiction written for adults. Let’s have the decency to let tween girls have their own little world of vampires and child wizards and games you play when hungry. Let’s not pump Justin Bieber in our Saabs and get engaged at Cinderella’s Castle at Disneyland. Because it’s embarrassing.

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Adrienne Rich Has Died

National Book Award-winning poet Adrienne Rich has passed away. She was 82 years old. Follow this Poetry Foundation link to read poems by the great author.

Over her long career, Rich (pictured, via Robert Giard) earned the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Lannan Lifetime Achievement Award and a MacArthur genius grant. Maud Newton pointed us toward Rich’s poem, “For the Dead.” An excerpt:

I have always wondered about the left-over
energy, the way water goes rushing down a hill
long after the rains have stopped

or the fire you want to go to bed from
but cannot leave, burning-down but not burnt-down
the red coals more extreme, more curious
in their flashing and dying
than you wish they were
sitting long after midnight

Harry Potter eBooks at Your Library

Digital copies of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series are now available at thousands of libraries thanks to a new partnership between Pottermore.com and OverDrive.

The library partnership comes just days after the books were released digitally by Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

eBookNewser has more details: “The seven book series can be checked out from more than 18,000 libraries and schools in more than 20 countries. The books are available in EPUB and Kindle in the U.S. in English. French, Italian, German and Spanish readers will have versions available soon.”

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