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Posts Tagged ‘Bob Staake’

3 Writing Tips From Authors at the 2014 National Book Festival

National Book FestOver the weekend, dozens of authors and illustrators appeared at the Library of Congress’ 14th annual National Book Festival. Children’s books creator Bob Staake designed this year’s official poster. We’ve collected three writing tips that some of the writers shared during their panels.

Joey Pigza book series author Jack Gantos suggests that one “stay as organized as possible.” He thinks that one should keep several notebooks. This helps to categorize different thoughts because one idea might be a good fit for the beginning a story and another could work for the middle.

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New Yorker Artist Shops Presidential Pup Book

2009_04_27-thumb-233x318.jpgUnbelievably, author and illustrator Bob Staake‘s new book, “The First Pup: The Unofficial Story Of How Sasha and Malia’s Dad Got the Presidency–And How They Got a Dog” hasn’t found a publisher yet.

Over at the New Yorker‘s book blog, Staake explained how he wrote his book these last few months as the First Family prepared for a new puppy. The book features lovable illustrations of many dogs, including poodles, schnauzers, spaniels, and finally, Bo, the Portuguese water dog who ended up at the White House.

In the post, the artist explained this week’s New Yorker cover (pictured): “You put any dog on the cover and everyone goes crazy … This cover is good at being cute, but it also works as a metaphor for Obama. The best New Yorker covers are the ones where the reader looks and brings their own interpretation, which brings the image to a new dimension.”