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Posts Tagged ‘David Byrne’

Oyster Now Counts 500k Books in Subscription Collection

oysterperseusOyster, the eBook subscription service that has been referred to as “the Netflix of eBooks,” now has 500,000 eBooks in its lending library.

New titles include: How Music Works by David ByrneFlight Behavior by Barbara KingsolverTelegraph Avenue by Michael ChabonThe Cider House Rules by John Irving and It Chooses You by Miranda July.

This is huge growth for the company’s catalog which counted only about 100,000 titles a few months back. The company raised $14 million in funding back in January and has since been expanding its publisher partnerships. The service launched kids books in February.

The service allows users access to its entire collection of books for a $9.95 a month subscription fee.

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Book Covers Uncovered

9780670021147L.jpgThe NY Observer initiated a literary blog conversation over the future of book jackets this week, highlighting fall books that lack these customary covers, like “Bicycle Diaries” by David Byrne.

Today on the Morning Media Menu, GalleyCat editor Jason Boog and AgencySpy editor Matt Van Hoven discussed the future of the book jacket in the age of digital books. What do you think–can the glossy slipcover last in the 21st Century?

Here’s more, from the article: “[E]ven though they’re hardcovers, their cover art is not printed on dust jackets but instead stamped directly onto the boards that hug their pages. The result is a handsome, eye-catching look that reflects a heightened awareness on the part of publishers that books these days cannot be counted on to simply sell themselves.”