AppNewser Appdata 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Ed Champion’

Shane Koyczan Interviewed about His Anti-Bullying Poem

Canadian poet Shane Koyczan wrote a poem about bullying called “To This Day,” and it has been adapted into an animated video that has earned nearly six million views on YouTube (embedded above).

Over at Follow Your Ears, Ed Champion interviewed the author about bullying and his poem. Here’s more from the site:

The video became a YouTube sensation, racking up five million views in a week. But before Koyczan had poetry, there was the daily hell at school in which he was singled out for being different. Now that the bully’s reach has extended beyond the classroom, Koyczan discusses how conversation and compassion are invaluable tools against the hate and meanness.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Saunders on Letterman

It’s not often that a writer appears on Letterman these days (ever?) but George Saunders did last week for his new essay collection THE BRAINDEAD MEGAPHONE. Originally available as a Quicktime download, now the embed code is available for one and all to share.

(embed code swiped from Mark Sarvas. Original story swiped from Ed Champion.)

The Ames/Davidson Literary Fight Night

AmesDavidson.jpg

Last night, around 250 people packed Gleason’s Gym in Dumbo to watch a boxing match. Vegas it may not have been, but the roar that went up in the crowd when Jonathan “The Herring Wonder” Ames‘s name was announced in the ring certainly came close to deafening my ears. Ames, previously 1-4 in boxing bouts, had spent the last few weeks training at Gleason’s for the bout against Canadian author Craig “The Crippler” Davidson, who’d fought poet Michael Knox last fall when the Canuck edition of THE FIGHTER was released and had come to New York – fitter and leaner even since BEA – to promote the American edition published by Soho Press.

I’d expected something of a blowout on either side but the match ended up being rather close – both Ames (who attracted attention for his entourage) and Davidson landed solid blows to head and torso, though one audience member commented afterwards at the post-game drinks at Rebar that Ames’ parrying was more theatrical while Davidson landed many more counterpunches. But as to why, as Vulture correspondent Alex Littlefield wondered, “the match seemed to end in a draw,” it’s because an exhibition fight held in New York City can’t officially end with a winner or a loser as no points were counted nor were any judges on the premises. So both Ames and Davidson held up trophies, each professing that they “were glad the match was over.”

Read more

BEA: On the Town

powerhouse.jpg

As always, the convention is only part of the BEA story, with parties filling in the gaps. So as promised, reports mixed with more blurry cameraphone photos follow of some of the parties I attended over the course of the weekend.

After our our party Thursday night, Mary Reagan and I cabbed across town to 60 Thompson Street for William Morrow‘s bash, where I finally met Pittsburgh Post-Gazette book editor Bob Hoover and proceeded to gab for twenty minutes about Canada, theater and the amazing Sidney Crosby (see, you can talk about subjects other than books at BEA. In fact, it’s a necessary tonic.) After that was the Litblog Co-Op party which was even more packed than the previous two as a plethora of literary bloggers celebrated with the likes of Richard Nash, Colson Whitehead, Sara Ivry, Katharine Weber, and (though I didn’t spot him) Morgan Entrekin.

Read more

Scene @ Alternative Press Expo

If you are, like me, a total neophyte to the comics scene, then the Alternative Press Expo, held last weekend at the Concourse in downtown San Francisco, is a good place to start – especially if you’re accompanied by Ed Champion (and his Bat Segundo Show gear) and Other Magazine‘s Sacha Arnold. Here the top dogs are Fantagraphics, Drawn & Quarterly, Topshelf and Oni, and they got plenty of attention from most of the convention attendees (not to mention the green-shirted CW crew, seen below interviewing one guitar-playing soul.) But the really cool stuff happened on the flanking fringes of the Concourse, where people who were really happy to be there and really, really excited to be selling their comic wares met with those equally excited to be buying them. People like the fine folks of Tumuly Studios, who see a void of all-ages comics waiting to be filled, or Brian Andersen (above, interviewed by moi) whose “So Super Duper” comic features a winningly conflicted young superhero-in-training with bold bright colors. And I must echo the generally positive sentiments about the reimagined Gumby comics, which in the hands of Bob Burden, Rick Geary and Steve Oliff are so delightfully warped (Gumby has girlfriends? The astral projections of Johnny Cash?!) that I may be addicted.

Read more