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Posts Tagged ‘Edward Champion’

Debut Novel Cut for Plagiarism

Q.R. Markham‘s debut spy novel Assassin of Secrets has been cut by Little, Brown’s Mulholland Books.

Publisher Michael Pietsch had this comment: “[I]t is with deep regret that we have published a book that we can no longer stand behind … Our goal is to never have this happen, but when it does, it is important to us to communicate with and compensate readers and retailers as quickly as possible.”

Edward Champion has collected examples of lifted passages. The author’s bio and book have been removed at Mulholland Books, but you can read his biography at his UK publisher’s site: “Markham has been a parks department employee, laundry-truck driver, door-to-door knife salesman, telemarketer, rock ‘n’ roll bassist, literary scout, book-reviewer, small business owner, and consultant. His writing has appeared in the Paris Review, Bomb Magazine, Witness, The New York Post, and more.”

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Occupy Wall Street Advice for Writers

Will you be writing about the Occupy Wall Street protests? As this movement grows, it will give writers around the country a chance to explore some of the toughest issues of our generation.

Today on the Morning Media Menu, journalist and literary blogger Edward Champion shared stories from his coverage of the Occupy Wall Street protests. Champion covered the controversial arrests on Brooklyn Bridge and spent many hours capturing the stories and songs of individual protestors.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview: “This particular protest offers so many unusual angles because Occupy Wall Street has now started to spread into additional cities, everywhere from London to Tuscon to Los Angeles … You don’t necessarily have to be in New York to take a look at this movement. If you just start to talk to people–which I think is the best way, if you are interested in journalism  and this particular issue–you’ll probably unearth a great deal of unexpected nuggets.”

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IKEA Dispels Death of the Bookcase Rumors

Last week The Economist speculated that the new 15-inch edition of the IKEA Billy bookcase illustrated how bookshelves are used for everything “except books that are actually read” in an eBook world.

The report sparked alarmed stories in a number of outlets, including The Consumerist, The Wall Street Journal and Time. In an interview with Edward Champion, an IKEA spokesperson dispelled these rumors of the demise of bookshelves.

Here’s an excerpt: “The Billy bookcase with the 11 inch depth will still be stocked. Production will not be curtailed. An additional Billy bookcase, with a 15 inch depth, will be introduced in all countries — an effort to respond to how customers are presently living their lives … As it turns out, not only had the 15 inch bookcase been in development for a period of eighteen months to two years. Ebooks didn’t factor at all into the decision.”

Should Bookstores Charge for Author Events?

Many independent bookstores across the country are considering charging for in-store author events. According to The New York Times, bookstore owners feel that too many people use their businesses as a place to research new titles and later buy the books online.

Here’s more from the article: “Roxanne Coady, the owner of R. J. Julia in Madison, Conn., was one of the first prominent booksellers to begin charging for events about five years ago, a move that she considered ‘desperate’ at the time. A ticket to get in, she said, generally can be paid toward the price of a book … About 10 percent of her revenue now comes from events, which are held about 200 times a year.”

Do you think bookstores should charge for author events? In May, Boulder Book Store implemented an admissions policy for store events. New York City’s McNally Jackson Books will charge for some events once they finish building a lower level events space.

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What Books Are You Looking Forward to in 2011?

WNYC recently asked media professionals from different fields what they are looking forward to in 2011.

Writer Edward Champion (pictured, via) listed several titles he is eager to read this year. His list included: Nicholson Baker‘s House of Holes: A Book of Raunch, Stewart O’Nan‘s Emily, Alone, and Anna North‘s America Pacifica.

Here’s more about his pick: “Nobody nails the magical way that the pedantic clutter up consciousness quite like Nicholson Baker, a novelist incapable of writing books without an infectious sense of joy.”

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Cooks Source Magazine Flooded with Protests

Cooks Source magazine received a flood of protest when they published “A Tale of Two Tarts” by Monica Gaudio–without the author’s knowledge or permission.

Gaudio contacted the editor looking for a written apology and a $130 (10 cents per word for her 1,300-word article) donation to the Columbia School of Journalism. The editor responded that Gaudio’s writing was featured in a “public domain” forum which means they are not compelled to ask for permission or pay monetary compensation.

Literary blogger Edward Champion investigated, uncovering many more articles lifted from other sources without attribution. Gaudio received waves of support at her site and at  Cooks Source‘s old Facebook page. The flood of protest caused them to move to this new page.

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April Fools’ Day Publishing News

bradm23.pngWhile GalleyCat was buried under news about agency models, eBooks, and Amazon, the rest of the publishing world played April Fools’ Day gags. Here are a few of our favorites. Add links to your favorites in the comments section.

Blogger Edward Champion spotted a piece of literary news: “With both literary journals facing financial difficulties in a tough economy, incoming Paris Review editor Lorin Stein announced this morning that his quarterly would be merging with Granta to form a new publication called The Grantaris Review.”

Techland had mashup news: “Quirk Books, publisher of Pride & Prejudice & Zombies, has announced another foray into the field of classic literature-classic horror mashups. The victim? Modernist titan James Joyce. In September Quirk will release A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Manticore.

And Publisher’s Weekly collected some real-life response from bestselling authors urging thriller writer Brad Meltzer stop writing.

Bud Light Super Bowl Ad Offends Book Clubs, Literary Bloggers, and Readers

Nobody ever expects high-culture Super Bowl ads, but a Bud Light advertisement irked some literary football fans.

Bud Light released the beer ad embedded below, mocking book clubs, male readers, female readers, and book reading in general. The ad shows a couple fun-loving beer drinkers crashing a book club, playing with all sorts of stereotypes about American readers. As this Twitter search shows, America’s reaction was mixed.

Literary blogger Edward Champion has led the online backlash against the ad. He described the message: “Let women have their ‘little’ book clubs, which can be easily interrupted on a masculine whim and which women will never dare object to. They will set everything aside to give you head or to serve you beer. And, by the way, if you’re a man, you don’t even need to read to get ahead in the world. (Indeed, one of the commercial’s curious philosophical positions is that one cannot both enjoy beer–at least the stuff better than the undrinkable swill that is being sold in this commercial–and books.”

What do you think? Leave your thoughts in the comments, and we’ll round up the responses later today. UPDATE: Jezebel rounds up other trouble-making ads.

Kirkus Reviews Closes; Twittersphere Ponders Future of Book Reviews

kirkus.jpgAs news broke that Kirkus Reviews would close, the Twittersphere exploded with commentary from worried writers, readers, and publishers around the world–can the book review survive the loss of this magazine that has reviewed literature since 1933?

Novelist Colson Whitehead wrote this tribute: “Kirkus, you were always kind to me. Thanks for slightly reducing my prepub anxiety, agony and agita.”

Washington Post Book World fiction editor had these thoughts: “You’d think w 3 newspapers still running book reviews & more than a dozen bookstores left in US, Kirkus would have been rolling in the dough…Every time we lose 1 of these rare independent voices we grow more dependent on publicists, authors’ parents’ friends clogging blogs [with] praise.”

Literary blogger Edward Champion wrote: “What happens to all the books that can’t get coverage in the newspapers? Blogs can’t come close to picking up the slack.”

Soft Skull editor Denise Oswald had this response: “Yikes, is this going to make it even harder to sell in.”

FTC Blogger Rules Carry $11K Fines

ftclogo.jpgToday the Federal Trade Commission revised their “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials” (click here to download), urging bloggers who review products, from a book to a video game system, to disclose if they received the product for free when giving an endorsement. According to the Washington Post, breaking these new guidelines could generate up to $11,000 in fines.

Literary blogger Edward Champion interviewed Bureau of Consumer Protection representative Richard Cleland about the guidelines to clarify for blogging reviewers. Cleland noted that newspaper book reviewers are exempt, because “the newspaper receives the book and it allows the reviewer to review it, it’s still the property of the newspaper.” These new guidelines will be put into effect on December 1, 2009.

Here’s a choice excerpt: “In the case of books, Cleland saw no problem with a blogger receiving a book, provided there wasn’t a linked advertisement to buy the book and that the blogger did not keep the book after he had finished reviewing it. Keeping the book would, from Cleland’s standpoint, count as ‘compensation’ and require a disclosure.”

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