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Posts Tagged ‘Gail Ross’

Author Picks Book Subject Out of a Hat

Pulitzer Prize winning Washington Post columnist Gene Weingarten picked the subject for his next book out of a hat. Literally.

Blue Rider Pres will publish One Day in 2015, “a non-fiction account of the events of a single day, chosen at random, in American History.” The book will focus on the randomly selected date of December 28, 1986. Gail Ross of The Ross Yoon Agency negotiated the deal with publisher David Rosenthal. Here’s more from the release:

Weingarten, best known for his long-form pieces for The Washington Post and books such as The Fiddler on the Subway, promises an in-depth look at one day in the life of the people of the United States as it happened, “but from high above, covering matters great and small – wide-angled, panoramic, with the added illuminating dimension of time.” The date, chosen at random by a waitress and two children at an oyster lunch (each drew a number from a hat: one for date, month and year), is the starting point for a book that will study “the universal power of humble truths,” says the author.

(Photo credit: Bill O’Leary)

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Gabriel Sherman Lands Deal for Fox News Book

New York Magazine contributing editor Gabriel Sherman has inked a book deal with Random House for The Loudest Voice in the Room, “an inside account of the rise of Fox News.” Yahoo’s Cutline has more details.

Gail Ross at Ross Yoon Agency negotiated the deal, at auction, with Jonathan Jao. Sherman has written a number of stories about the cable TV beat, including “Chasing Fox“–a long-form look at the network’ strategy.

Here’s an excerpt from the article: “Fox’s secret is that viewers stay … The news, especially political news, wasn’t something that happened. It was something that you shaped out of the raw data, brought out of the clay of zhlubby, boring politics, reborn with heroes and villains, triumphs and reverses, never-ending story lines—what TV executives call ‘flow’ … All the fire went one way. The viewers, on their couches, were flattered as the most important participants, the foot soldiers in Fox’s army; some of them even voted.”