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Posts Tagged ‘J.D. Salinger’

J.D. Salinger and the Brigitte Bardot Bananafish Adaptation that Never Happened

9780316767729_94X145.jpgThe New Yorker just published a short essay by the great journalist Lillian Ross, a tribute to her long friendship with the reclusive J.D. Salinger.

Her brief sketch fills in more details about Salinger’s life than most profiles, giving a peek into Salinger’s hobbies and thoughts about unwritten books. Best of all, the portrait contains a tantalizing tidbit about an adaptation of his classic story “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” that never happened.

Here’s an excerpt: “Salinger loved movies, and he was more fun than anyone to discuss them with. He enjoyed watching actors work, and he enjoyed knowing them. (He loved Anne Bancroft, hated Audrey Hepburn, and said that he had seen ‘Grand Illusion’ ten times.) Brigitte Bardot once wanted to buy the rights to ‘A Perfect Day for Bananafish,’ and he said that it was uplifting news. ‘I mean it,’ he told me. ‘She’s a cute, talented, lost enfante, and I’m tempted to accommodate her, pour le sport.’”

Reading Letters to J.D. Salinger

1689600-R3-040-18A.jpgThe great author J.D. Salinger passed away yesterday, leaving behind a powerful literary legacy. Today’s guest on the Morning Media Menu was Chris Kubica, co-editor of Letters to J.D. Salinger and curator of jdsalinger.com.

Here’s more about the book, a tribute to the author of The Catcher in the Rye and Nine Stories. “[It] commemorates the 50th anniversary of The Catcher in the Rye and celebrates the formative influence the book and Salinger’s other works have had on many writers, scholars and readers. Letters to Salinger contains approximately 80 open letters to J. D. Salinger.

Press play on the embedded player below to listen. The episode will be archived around the network all day.

Here’s an excerpt: “For the most part it seems like people who are writing stories about Salinger aren’t looking any farther than the things they can find online. In fact, the majority of the material written about Salinger–from literary critical perspective, the interviews, reviews–are all pre-Internet. You’d have to go to an archive and read the old magazines. It’s clear to me that people aren’t really doing that. They are just getting the soundbytes and pulling things off saying, ‘Here’s a link to this, here’s a link to that.’”

You can listen to all the past podcasts archived at mediabistro.com or download episodes for free on iTunes. Click here to download the MP3 version.

A Brief History of J. D. Salinger Reviews

9780316769020_94X145.jpgAuthor J.D. Salinger passed away today, generating thousands of posts around the Internet. In honor of this great writer, we’ve collected a few links to the evolving critical opinion of Salinger’s work.

In 1951, James Stern wrote one of those ‘I’ll write like a character in the novel’ book reviews that never quite work. Dig it: “This Salinger, he’s a short story guy. And he knows how to write about kids. This book though, it’s too long. Gets kind of monotonous. And he should’ve cut out a lot about these jerks and all at that crumby school. They depress me.”

In 1961, the great John Updike reviewed Franny and Zooey. Check it out: “His fiction, in its rather grim bravado, its humor, its morbidity, its wry but persistent hopefulness, matches the shape and tint of present American life. It pays the price, however, of becoming dangerously convoluted and static. A sense of composition is not among Salinger’s strengths, and even these two stories, so apparently complementary, distinctly jangle as components of one book.”

In 2004, Jonathan Yardley pondered The Catcher in the Rye. “What most struck me upon reading it for a second time was how sentimental — how outright squishy — it is. The novel is commonly represented as an expression of adolescent cynicism and rebellion — a James Dean movie in print — but from first page to last Salinger wants to have it both ways.”

Finally, in an engaging essay, Janet Malcolm revived the reputation of Salinger’s Franny and Zooey. Here’s an excerpt: “Today Zooey does not seem too long, and is arguably Salinger’s masterpiece. Rereading it and its companion piece Franny is no less rewarding than rereading The Great Gatsby. It remains brilliant and is in no essential sense dated. It is the contemporary criticism that has dated.”

If you want to read more, Literary History has a collection of links. As GalleyCat Reviews grows, we will feature daily links to excellent literary criticism. If you think a book review you wrote should be featured for our audience, email GalleyCat a link.

J. D. Salinger Has Died

51namOub2kL._SL500_AA240_.jpgThe reclusive, brilliant author J.D. Salinger has died.

Salinger will be immortalized for creating the character Holden Caulfield in his 1951 novel, The Catcher in the Rye. He also wrote the collection Nine Stories and Franny and Zooey. He famously avoided publicity, but his death has spread over Twitter like wildfire.

Here’s more from an AP report: “Salinger died of natural causes at his home on Wednesday, the author’s son said in a statement from Salinger’s literary representative. He had lived for decades in self-imposed isolation in the small, remote house in Cornish, N.H.”

May 2009: Top Publishing Stories of the Year

alicemunroe.jpgIn May’s biggest headline, a blogger spotted similarities between one paragraph of NY Times columnist and author Maureen Dowd‘s weekend column and a post by Josh Marshall at Talking Points Memo. Dowd corrected the mistake, and no disciplinary action was taken.

Novelist John Wray unveiled his tattoo of book reviewer Michiko Kakutani at a reading. GalleyCat went to Puerto Rico with the Hunter S. Thompson Travel Agency.

The literary blogosphere buzzed about a sequel to J.D. Salinger‘s famous novel, “The Catcher in the Rye,” but GalleyCat had some doubts. Finally, Alice Munro (pictured, via) won the £60,000 Man Booker International Prize.

Welcome to GalleyCat’s annual year-end roundup of publishing headlines. It’s a chance to celebrate our good news and reflect on our bad news after a long, challenging year for the industry. Visit our Year in Review link to read all about what happened to publishing in 2009. Include your favorite headlines in the comments section…

Court of Appeals Pans J.D. Salinger Follow-Up

salingerbook.jpgYesterday author Fredrik Colting took his defense of his J.D. Salinger-inspired book to the U.S. Court of Appeals, hoping the court will reverse an order enjoining publication of “60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye.”

According to Litigation Daily, Frankfurt, Kurnit, Klein & Selz partner Edward Rosenthal defended Colting and SCB Distributors Inc. in front of a three-judge panel, calling the book “highly transformative with enormous amounts of commentary and criticism.” After a hearing last month, federal judge Deborah Batts ruled that the Swedish author could not publish this book that re-examines the story of “The Catcher in the Rye.”

Here’s more from the article: “Rip-off or not, the book did not fare well under the critical eye of Judge Guido Calabresi at Thursday’s hearing. He called it “a rather dismal piece of work” … Judge Calabresi said the case raised First Amendment issues and that the district court may need more evidence to decide.”

Author Appeals J.D. Salinger’s Legal Victory

salingerbook.jpgIn a 58-page brief, author Fredrik Colting and his legal team disputed that his follow-up to J.D. Salinger‘s most famous novel was not a sequel, but “a critical examination.”

In the new filing, the legal team asks the U.S. Court of Appeals to reverse the court’s order enjoining publication of “60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye.” After a hearing last month, federal Judge Deborah Batts ruled that a Swedish author could not publish this book that re-examines the story of “The Catcher in the Rye.”

Here’s more from the newly-filed appellants’ brief: “Had this commentary and criticism been published as an essay, a dissertation or an academic article, there is no doubt that it never would have been enjoined. And banning it, merely because it is presented in what might be a less academic form, not only deprives the Defendants of their rights, but also denies the public the opportunity to read this work and to appreciate the new light it sheds on one of the most famous works of American fiction.”

Copyfight: David Rees Vs. Jamba Juice

gywo_200.jpgDavid Rees, the comic creator behind the “Get Your War On” series, has declared war on Jamba Juice this week after the company appeared to copy his style in an ad campaign–publicizing the copyfight with John Hodgman and his Twitter friends.

However, unlike J.D. Salinger suing to block an unauthorized sequel, Rees has a different problem: his distinctive work depends on public domain clip art, so it’s hard to find a legal remedy. One reader laid out the problem: “You’ve made it clear you don’t want to sue anyone, and that’s because you can’t. If you want to get pissed off, save it for a time when you learn how to draw and are actually protecting original work…You should be flattered.”

The author responded: “I’ve got nothing but love for … any of the other 10,000 webcomics that use the same Dover clip art I use. But the Jarmbur Juice ad campaign looks so totally, exactly like GYWO that I feel they crossed some kind of line.”

Judge Grants Temporary Restraining Order Against Salinger Tribute

salingerbook.jpgA federal judge issued a restraining order yesterday, temporarily blocking the publication of author Fredrik Colting‘s book “60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye”–a novel revisiting characters from a classic J.D. Salinger novel.

According to Publishers Weekly, judge Deborah Batts granted a temporary order against the book that some have described as a sequel to “The Catcher in the Rye,” and must decide in the next ten days if she will permanently enjoin publication. In addition, the judge will rule if Colting’s book was fair use of Salinger’s work.

The article explained: “Batts’s ruling is the first time that the Second Circuit has explicitly ruled that a single character from a single work is copyrightable … [Batts] ruled that Caulfield, though appearing in only one book, was sufficiently delineated.”

Sara Nelson Defends Salinger Follow-Up

salingerbook.jpgFormer Publishers Weekly editor Sara Nelson has joined the legal fight against J.D. Salinger‘s efforts to block the publication of “60 Years Later–Coming Through the Rye.” UPDATE: On her Twitter feed, Nelson adds this comment: “For the record, I did not ‘join’ the anti-Salinger camp — just don’t think this book will hurt ['The Catcher in the Rye'].”

Yesterday the publishing reporter filed a declaration as an expert literary witness in the defense of author John David California (a pseudonym for author Fredrik Colting), Windupbird Publishing and SCB Distributors–the parties sued by Salinger to block 60 Years, a “critical analysis” that revisits the author’s classic novel, “The Catcher in the Rye.” The law firm of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz argue that Salinger’s legal team cannot prove “commercial harm” will result from the book, filing expert testimony from Nelson and two literature professors.

Here’s an excerpt from Nelson’s expert testimony: “Through my experience covering the publishing industry as a reporter and an editor, I understand the myriad variables that contribute to–or detract from–a book’s commercial success … 60 Years will have no detrimental impact on sales of Catcher … Anticipated sales of 60 Years, a critical analysis by a little-known author, pale in comparison to Catcher’s success … It is more likely that 60 Years, through its critical content and the attendant publicity it will likely generate, will actually contribute to renewed interest in, discussion of, and consequently sales of, Catcher.”

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