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Posts Tagged ‘John Green’

VIDEO: Hank Green Rants About Books

Hank Green, brother to The Fault in Our Stars novelist John Green and one half of the creators behind the Vlogbrothers YouTube Channel, has created a video called “Ranting about Books.”

In the video embedded above, Green shares his complaints on the way books are being published. Some of his gripes include:

    • Sharing spoilers on the jacket flap copy.
    • Not explicitly printing the series title for books that belong in a series.
    • Book covers featuring “decapitated YA fiction ladies.”

What do you think? Do you share the same grievances?

‘The Fault in Our Stars’ Movie Trailer Released

20th Century Fox has released the first official trailer for The Fault in Our Stars film adaptation. We’ve embedded the video above–what do you think?

A short clip from the movie was also showcased on The Today Show earlier this morning. Author John Green sent out a tweet not long after that airing to assure his fans that a full trailer will be available “online soonish.”

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Dan Brown’s ‘Inferno’ Was The Bestselling Book of 2013: USA Today

inferno304Dan Brown‘s Inferno was the bestselling book of 2013, according to USA Today‘s Bestsellers list which tracked book sales in the US from Dec. 31, 2012-Dec. 29, 2013.

Divergent by Veronica Roth was No. 2 on the list. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Hard Luck by Jeff Kinney reached No. 3 on the list. Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks was No. 4 and The Fault in Our Stars by John Green was the No. 5 bestselling book of the year.

Here is more from USA Today:

Of the best sellers tracked by USA TODAY each week, 80% were fiction. That’s the highest since the list was begun in 1993, breaking 2011′s record of 78%. The top non-fiction book of 2013 at No. 9 was Killing Jesus by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. Their 2012 book, Killing Kennedy, continued to sell last year, finishing at No. 61.

Writers Respond to Overstock & Amazon Price War

Amazon and Overstock engaged in some print book price warfare this week, lowering prices in a race to the bottom of the literary marketplace.

On Twitter, readers and writers debated the price war. We’ve created a Storify post below rounding up some of our favorite responses.

You can survey the battlefield for yourself on Overstock: John Green‘s The Fault in Our Stars hardcover selling for $5.31, Sheryl Sandberg‘s Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead hardcover for $8.18 or Dan Brown‘s Inferno for $9.43.

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John Green: ‘Penguin has emerged as the most effective publishing house in YA’

Novelist John Green called Penguin “the most effective publishing house in YA” in a thoughtful essay about the success of his novel, The Fault in Our Stars.

According to the author, the YA novel has nearly one million copies in print, eclipsing his previous books. Green cited six reason for the book’s bestseller status, including: “My entire backlist is with the same publishing house” and “Elyse Marshall is my publicist.” Penguin just happens to the best right now. Check it out:

Power shifts quickly in publishing, but there’s little question that under the leadership of Don Weisberg, Felicia Frazier, and Jennifer Loja, Penguin has emerged as the most effective publishing house in YA. I also think Penguin has the best sales team, and it helps that I’ve known most of those people personally for eight years. Penguin has always been very good at facilitating relationships and collaborations between authors and employees.

(Link via Pamela Paul)

John Green Delivers Commencement Address at Butler University

The Fault in Our Stars author John Green delivered the commencement speech at the graduation ceremony for Butler University’s class of 2013. To read the entire speech, head to Green’s Tumblr page.

Watch the entire speech in the video embedded above (his talk begins at the 1:01:08 mark). Here’s an excerpt:

I would just note that the default assumption is that the point of human life is to be as successful as possible, to acquire lots of fame or glory or money as defined by quantifiable metrics: number of twitter followers, or facebook friends, or dollars in one’s 401k.

This is the hero’s journey, right? The hero starts out with no money and ends up with a lot of it, or starts out an ugly duckling and becomes a beautiful swan, or starts out an awkward girl and becomes a vampire mother, or grows up an orphan living under the staircase and then becomes the wizard who saves the world. We are taught that the hero’s journey is the journey from weakness to strength. But I am here today to tell you that those stories are wrong. The real hero’s journey is the journey from strength to weakness.

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Jeff Kinney Wins Author of the Year

The 2013 Children’s Choice Book Award winners have been revealed. Jeff Kinney took author of the year award and John Green won the teen book of the year prize.

We’ve linked to free samples of all the winners below. How many have you read? Here’s more from the release:

The Children’s Book Council and Every Child a Reader announced the winners of the sixth annual Children’s Choice Book Awards (CCBAs) at a charity gala benefitting Every Child a Reader in New York City last night.  The announcement is an annual highlight of Children’s Book Week (May 13-19, 2013) as the CCBAs is the only national book awards program where the winning titles are selected by kids and teens. Young readers across the country voted in record numbers for their favorite books, author, and illustrator at bookstores, school libraries, and at bookweekonline.com, casting more than 1,000,000 votes.

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Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2012

The American Library Association (ALA) has released its annual list of the most frequently challenged library books of the year. We’ve linked to free samples of all the books on the list–follow the links below to read these controversial books yourself.

The list was part of the ALA’s 2013 State of America’s Libraries Report. During the past year, the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom received 464 reports of challenged books. Here’s more from the report:

In California, a school committee voted to remove the Stephen King novella “Different Seasons” from Rocklin High School library shelves. The lone dissenter on that committee was 17-year-old student Amanda Wong, who continued to fight the ban and spoke against the decision at a later school board meeting. After hearing Wong’s concerns that the removal “opens a door to censoring other materials,” the district superintendent overturned the committee’s decision and returned the book to the Rocklin High School library’s collection.

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Adam Johnson Wins the Tournament of Books

Adam Johnson has won The Morning News’ annual Tournament of Books with The Orphan Master’s Son.

The contest pits novels in a competitive bracket like basketball teams during the NCAA tournament. The two finalists this year were The Fault in Our Stars by John Green and The Orphan Master’s Son. Johnson had this statement:

I’ll admit I’m a ToB addict, so it’s a special honor to be included in the bracket and to survive some fascinating matchups. And to get bumped, only to Zombie back? My highest achievement. Really, I read it all—the reviews, the color commentary, the reader comments, the NOOK ads—and it always got my day going by thinking about books: why we write them, how we read them, how we speak to them, what they mean to us. I will now demand that my publisher place silver Rooster stickers on all the paperbacks.

Penguin Young Readers Group to Publish Book by Esther Grace Earl

Penguin Young Readers Group will publish a memoir entitled This Star Won’t Go Out: The Life & Words of Esther Grace Earl. The book will posthumously publish journal entries, fiction pieces, personal letters and sketches written by a fan of young-adult author John Green.

Green dedicated The Fault in Our Stars  to her and will write an introduction to Earl’s book. Her family and friends will also contribute photos and essays. In a blog post, Green shared her story:

I am so glad that I knew Esther, and that she was a nerdfighter, and that through Esther’s family and This Star Won’t Go Out we can still decrease suck with her. But I am also really pissed off that she died … Esther inspired the story in the sense that I was very angry after her death and wrote constantly, with a focus and passion I hadn’t known since I was rewriting Looking for Alaska in 2003. And Esther helped me to imagine teenagers as more empathetic than I’d given them credit for. And her charm and snark inspired the novel, as did her idea of incorporating an author she liked into her Wish.

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