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Posts Tagged ‘Kate Mosse’

A. M. Homes Wins Women’s Prize for Fiction

A. M. Homes has won the Women’s Prize for Fiction this year for her novel, May We Be Forgiven.

The prize, formerly known as the OrangePrize for Fiction, will be renamed the “Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction” next year. Chair Kate Mosse explained the new sponsorship deal in the release:

We were delighted by the range of interest – and enjoyed meeting brands in various sectors – but in the end, the Women’s Prize for Fiction Board felt Baileys was the ideal choice as our new partners. We were impressed not only by the scale of their ambition, but also their passion for celebrating outstanding fiction by women and willingness to help in bringing the prize to ever wider audiences.

(Via Michele Filgate)

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Orange to End Sponsorship of Prize for Fiction

Orange Prize for Fiction co-founder Kate Mosse revealed today that the mobile phone company Orange will end its sponsorship of the U.K. literary award that bears its name.

The Prize for Fiction carries a £30,000 award, and winners receive a bronze figurine nicknamed the “Bessie.” Follow this link to read a list of the 2012 shortlist–the winner will be revealed on May 30th. Here’s more from Mosse:

On behalf of everyone on the Prize for Fiction Women’s Committee, I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the hard work of all those at Orange, past and present, for their investment, passion, support and never ending enthusiasm. This is the end of an era, but no major arts project should stand still. We are very much looking forward to developing the Prize for the future and working with a new sponsor to ensure the Prize grows and plays an even more significant part in the years to come. We are in active discussions with a number of potential new brand partners and look forward to the start of another exciting chapter for the Prize.

Richard & Judy’s Hitmaking Ability

The Guardian’s John Dugdale comments on one of the big publishing stories in the UK, one that promises to grow even more in 2007: the Richard & Judy effect. It’s especially visible in the top 100 bestsellers of 2006: Kate Mosse at number one and Victoria Hislop at number two were both R&J selections, as were Dorothy Koomson (nine), Sam Bourne (13), Elizabeth Kostova (14) and Elisabeth Hyde (39). Not only have the lists become more female-dominated – correlating with R&J’s picks this year – but an additional effect is that more debut or new-ish authors are getting their due, especially with literary fiction. “Most of those in the top 20 have only emerged as hit-makers within the past three or four years,” Dugdale says, “and you have to look as far down as No 17 – Patricia Cornwell – to find a 90s survivor.” Which should, on the surface, bode well for additional new talent this coming year…