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Posts Tagged ‘Lawrence Wright’

PW names the 100 best books of 2014

PW_11_3_1Publishers Weekly today released its list of the 100 Best Books of 2014, for the first time including three translations among its top 10 books, which were written by Hassam Blasim, Elena Ferrante, Marlon James, Lorrie Moore, Joseph O’Neill, Héctor Tobar, Eula Biss, Leslie Jamison, Lawrence Wright, and Emmanuel Carrère.

The three translations include two works of fiction: The Corpse Exhibition by Hassan Blasim, translated from the Arabic by Jonathan Wright (Penguin), and Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay by Elena Ferrante, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein (Europa). Limonov: The Outrageous Adventures of the Radical Soviet Poet Who Became a Bum in New York, a Sensation in France, and a Political Antihero in Russia by Emmanuel Carrère, is nonfiction translated from the French by John Lambert (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

“Every year when we put together our best books list, we understand why we’re in this business,” Publishers Weekly review editor Louisa Ermelino said. “It’s not just about the best books, but the fact that there are so many good books being published that we have to struggle to choose. We consider the game-changers, the brilliantly written pure entertainment, the clever, the well researched.”

Publishers Weekly’s selects for the best Young Adults books include: Meg Wolitzer’s Belzhar, We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, Beyond Magenta by Susan Kuklin, and Half Bad by Sally Green, among other titles.

Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi and Redefining Girly by Melissa Atkins Wardy are two of its best Lifestyle books of 2014.

Marlon James, featured on PW’s cover, is author of A Brief History of Seven Killings (Riverhead), a sweeping saga with the attempted assassination of Bob Marley at its center.

Descriptions of Publishers Weekly’s “100 Best Books of 2014” are available here.

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Tina Brown To Write Memoir About Her Media Life

Editor and author Tina Brown has sold her memoir to Henry Holt’s Metropolitan Books imprint. Media Beast will come out in 2016.

Agent Ed Victor negotiated the deal with publisher Stephen Rubin in “an exclusive submission.” Rubin published Brown’s biography of Princess Diana, The Diana Chronicles. Metropolitan Books publisher Sara Bershtel will edit.

The book will cover Brown’s legendary career as a young magazine editor, but also cover her tim leading Talk magazine, working with Harvey Weinstein, her CNBC talk show “Topic A” and her leadership at The Daily Beast. Brown left the website earlier this week.

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Miller Moves from Vintage to Knopf

PW Daily reports that Vintage/Anchor senior editor Andrew Miller is moving floors in the Random House building as a result of his new gig as a senior editor at Knopf. “Andrew is an exceptional editor who, in his tenure at Vintage/Anchor, has demonstrated a keen eye for topical nonfiction,” said Knopf chairman and editor-in-chief Sonny Mehta in yesterday’s announcement. Miller has edited books by Victor Davis Hanson, Tom Bissell, James Fallows and Neal Pollack, as well as worked with authors including Robert Caro, David Remnick, Lawrence Wright, Robert Kagan, Hampton Sides, and Chuck Palahniuk.

Pulitzer Prize Winners

The Pulitzer Prize has announced its winners in a variety of categories, and while our Fishbowl siblings will be dissecting the journalism winners, we’ll look at the book-related winners:

FICTION: Cormac McCarthy, THE ROAD (Knopf)

  • Also nominated as finalists in this category were: AFTER THIS by Alice McDermott (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), and THE ECHO MAKER by Richard Powers (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • HISTORY: Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff, THE RACE BEAT (Knopf)

  • Also nominated as finalists in this category were: “Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005″ by James T. Campbell (The Penguin Press), and “Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War” by Nathaniel Philbrick (Viking).
  • BIOGRAPHY: Debby Applegate, THE MOST FAMOUS MAN IN AMERICA (Doubleday)

  • Also nominated as finalists in this category were: “John Wilkes: The Scandalous Father of Civil Liberty” by Arthur H. Cash (Yale University Press), and “Andrew Carnegie” by David Nasaw (The Penguin Press).
  • GENERAL NONFICTION: Lawrence Wright, THE LOOMING TOWER (Knopf)

  • Also nominated as finalists in this category were: “Crazy: A Father’s Search Through America’s Mental Health Madness” by Pete Earley (Putnam), and “Fiasco: The American Military Adventure in Iraq” by Thomas E. Ricks (The Penguin Press).
  • POETRY: Natasha Trethewey, NATIVE GUARD (Houghton Mifflin)

  • Also nominated as finalists in this category were: “The Republic of Poetry” by Martin Espada (W.W. Norton), and “Interrogation Palace: New & Selected Poems 1982-2004″ by David Wojahn (University of Pittsburgh Press).
  • The upshot is that some of the smaller university presses should be proud, the big winners were Knopf, FSG and the Penguin Press – and about the only prize Cormac McCarthy hasn’t earned is beatification, but who knows, that may follow in due course…

    The Looming Tower As a Play

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    The New York Times’ Campbell Robertson profiles Lawrence Wright, award-winning author of THE LOOMING TOWER, an account of the days and actions leading up to 9/11. Now he’s turned the book into a one-man show, “My Trip to Al-Qaeda”, a seemingly odd exercise by someone with little acting and monologuing experience. So why undertake the experience, which now has a six-week-run at The Culture Project?

    Turns out it came out of his time researching the book, where he struggled to maintain journalistic objectivity. “It was really difficult for me to keep my emotions under control,” he said. He began toying with the idea of writing something that would relate his experiences while working on THE LOOMING TOWER but he did not want to write another book. Andre Bishop, the artistic director of Lincoln Center Theater, encouraged him to pursue a one-man show, so Wright spent a few months working on the show – which features videos, photos and some onstage props – and presented a draft of the piece at The New Yorker festival. And after the run is over, Wright isn’t sure what will happen next, or whether an actor will step in the role he’s essentially playing onstage. “I’m sure that at some point,” he said, “I’m going to want to get back to my much different, much more private, writing life.”