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Posts Tagged ‘Maaza Mengiste’

Chang-Rae Lee & Wilbert Rideau Win 2011 Dayton Literary Peace Prize

Chang-Rae Lee and Wilbert Rideau have won the 2011 Dayton Literary Peace Prize. Lee won the $10,000 fiction prize for The Surrendered and Rideau won the $10,000 nonfiction prize for In the Place of Justice.

Isabel Wilkerson was the nonfiction runner-up for The Warmth of Other Suns while Maaza Mengiste was the fiction runner-up for Beneath the Lion’s Gaze. They will each receive $1,000. Ken McClane, Eric Bates, Ron Carlson, and April Smith served as judges.

Here’s more from the release: “The Foundation will also award Professor Nigel Young with a special Dayton Literary Peace Prize Award for Scholarship for his role as editor of The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Peace (Oxford University Press).  The award, which carries a $1,000 prize, was created especially for the Encyclopedia as a tribute to its lasting contribution to the study of peace, and also to Young’s monumental achievement in marshalling the efforts of hundreds of scholars from around the world to create this unique and comprehensive work.”

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War Novelists Share Writing Tips at the Brooklyn Book Festival

At the Brooklyn Book Festival, Red Flags author Juris Jurjevics, Beaufort author Ron Leshem and Beneath the Lion’s Gaze author Maaza Mengiste participated on a panel about writing war stories. Throughout their talk, they shared these four handy tips to keep in mind when practicing this particular style of writing.

1. A lot of war stories are highly romanticized; be careful with your language to maintain authenticity.

2. In war, there is no good and there is not bad. The lines become blurred during war. Make sure that human complexicities are well incorporated into the story.

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