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Posts Tagged ‘Mario Vargas Llosa’

Ian McEwan Wins $10,000 Jerusalem Prize

UK author Ian McEwan (pictured, via) has won the $10,000 Jerusalem Prize. It will be awarded at the 25th International Jerusalem Book Fair. The biennial prize recognizes work that articulates ideas about “freedom of the individual in society.”

Here’s more from the release: “McEwan’s protagonists struggle for their right to give personal expression to their ideas, and to live according to those ideas in an environment of political and social turmoil. His obvious affection for them, and the compelling manner in which he describes their struggle, make him one of the most important writers of our time. His books have been translated into many languages and have enjoyed world-wide success – particularly in Israel, where he is one of the most widely-read of foreign authors.”

Several past winners (including Peruvian writer, Mario Vargas Llosa) have also received the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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Mario Vargas Llosa Won’t Run for Office Again

Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa does not intend to run for political office again. When he was 54-years-old,  Llosa ran against Alberto Fujimori for Peru’s 1990 presidential election.

While collecting his 10 million Swedish crown ($1.46 million) Nobel Prize for Literature, Llosa addressed the topic. The author (pictured, via Morgana Vargas Llosa) currently serves as a visiting professor at Princeton University.

A Reuters article had this quote from Llosa: ”We had practically a civil war … we had hyper-inflation … It was because of those circumstances that I had the necessity of political participation. I certainly won’t repeat this experience.” (Via Book Bench)

Nobel Prize Winning Authors Who Didn’t Win for Lit

This year’s Nobel Prize in Literature went to Mario Vargas Llosa who beat the odds and captured the tax-free $2 million award. The Huffington Post rounded-up seven authors who have won the Nobel prize in categories other than literature.

The winners include Barack Obama, Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama, Martin Luther King Jr., Elie Wiesel, James D. Watson, and Joseph Stiglitz. In 1993, Mandela shared the prize with Frederik Willem de Klerk for their work towards ending apartheid. Mandela has also published his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom. Last year, Obama was honored with the prize; he has written three books: Dreams of My Father, The Audacity of Hope, and the forthcoming picture book, Of Thee I Sing.

Chinese author Liu Xiaobo joined this inspirational group, winning this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. The judges honored the writer “for his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China.”

Mario Vargas Llosa Wins the Nobel Prize in Literature

Novelist Mario Vargas Llosa has won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Here’s more about Llosa (pictured, via) from the Nobel site: “[he was awarded] for his cartography of structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt, and defeat.”

UPDATE: eBookNewser has more about the author’s conspicuous lack of eBooks. Picador will reprint 10 paperbacks by the Nobel winner. Finally, Maud Newton points us to the novelist’s Charlie Rose interview.

In a 2002 Guardian interview, the novelist explained his commitment to writing: “The writer’s job is to write with rigour, with commitment, to defend what they believe with all the talent they have. I think that’s part of the moral obligation of a writer, which cannot be only purely artistic. I think a writer has some kind of responsibility at least to participate in the civic debate. I think literature is impoverished, if it becomes cut from the main agenda of people, of society, of life.”

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Marquez, Vargas Llosa Stop Feuding

One of the literary world’s most famous fights appears to have been mended. A special edition to mark the 40th anniversary of Gabriel Garcia Marquez‘s ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE is slated for publication this year, and will include a prologue by Mario Vargas Llosa, Garcia Marquez’s one-time close friend. “Both men are in agreement over this,” a spokesman for Spain’s Royal Academy, which is publishing the edition, told the Guardian yesterday, even though the two authors famously came to blows at a Mexican cinema in 1976 and haven’t spoken since.

The introduction is reported to be an excerpt from Vargas Llosa’s laudatory book on García Marquez, published when the two were friends in 1971, called HISTORY OF A DEICIDE. The Peruvian writer had apparently refused to allow the book to be republished after his falling out with García Marquez. He finally relented last year, adding it to a collection of his complete works in Spain. “There is no point in censoring a part of your life,” he said at the time. Both writers have remained silent about the reasons for their brawl, except to say it was about something personal.

García Marquez, who published a first volume of memoirs four years ago, is resisting writing a second volume, reportedly because he does not want to go into the reasons behind that fight. “I have realized that if I write the second volume, I will have to tell things that I do not want to tell about certain personal relationships that are not at all good,” he said in an interview with Spain’s La Vanguardia newspaper last year.