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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Frauenfelder’

Mark Frauenfelder Explores DIY Lifestyle

mfdiy.pngAs the recession drags on, do-it-yourself culture has become more important–both to save money and use resources more carefully. One writer dedicated his new book to the DIY experience.

Today’s guest on the Morning Media Menu was BoingBoing co-founder and former Wired editor Mark Frauenfelder talking about his new book, Made By Hand. He shared advice for both do-it-yourself fans and aspiring DIY book authors. The author will also be speaking at Barnes & Noble Tribeca tonight at 7 pm.

Press play below to listen.

He shared advice for aspiring DIY book authors: “I think DIY books are fantastic. It’s a great way to share knowledge and your skills. What I would do is focus on projects that to you are really meaningful and have a lot of bang for the buck. For me, it was working on producing my own food–gardening techniques, chickens, the bees, and doing old school preservation methods.”

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Novel Writing: Editing Your Draft

Novel Writing: Editing Your DraftStarting July 16, workshop your novel in-progress with a published author! Erika Mailman's course will function as a workshop, with the emphasis on sharing your work for review and providing critiques for your peers. By the end of this class you'll have up to 75 pages of you novel workshopped and developed patterns to improve your writing. Register now! 

Chris Anderson’s Mistake: Common or Careless?

canderson_free.jpgAs the literary world debates unattributed lines from Wikipedia in Chris Anderson‘s new book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price,” one writer left some words of support.

“I’m surprised that the VQN is coming down so hard on you about it. It’s obvious you didn’t try to pull a fast one,” wrote author Mark Frauenfelder. “You just made a mistake of carelessness, which is human and forgivable.” At the same time, the writer wondered if companies exist–like Turnitin–to make sure that notes didn’t get absorbed into text.

What do the nonfiction writers in the audience think? Frauenfelder raises a point about a cut-and-paste writing world: “I think many non-fiction writers share the same nagging fear that their source notes will accidentally get mixed into the manuscript without proper attribution. Because it’s so easy to copy and paste, this kind of thing is going to happen to other writers. I’m working on a book now and I really hope I haven’t screwed up! I wonder if there’s some kind of company I can hire to check my manuscript before the book gets published?”