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Posts Tagged ‘New York Public Library’

Tiger Beat & Y.A. Authors Rock Out at New York Public Library

Usually you can’t talk inside a library, much less have a rock concert. Last night, Tiger Beat (a band comprised of Y.A. authors) played inside the 42nd Street New York Public Library.

Jack Martin hosted the NYC Teen Author Festival event, titled “Y.A. Rocks.” The night included music-related-readings from Philana Marie Boles, Jon Skovron, Jeri Smith-Ready, and Rita Williams-Garcia. Band members Libba Bray, Daniel Ehrenhaft, and Barney Miller also read.

The video embedded above shows Tiger Beat playing their original song, “Y.A. Song.” The lyrics make references to The Hunger Games, The Chocolate Wars, Catcher in the Rye, and several other titles. As they played, NYPL intern Zach held up specially-made illustrated cue cards with the lyrics to the song. It was his first day on the job.

Hachette Offers Digital Review Copies on NetGalley

hachette.jpgHachette Book Group (HBG) has joined with NetGalley to organize the distribution of HBG information and products. Through this deal, select reviewers, press, and booksellers will be given access to digital press kits and digital galleys.

Several enhancements will be included with the galleys such as video, audio, tour schedules, author Q&As and photos. The galleys will be readable on Kindle, Nook, Sony eReader, Kobo or a desktop.

Here’s more from the release: “The Hachette Book Group titles in NetGalley will expand in the coming months, but you can browse current Hachette Book Group galleys right now, from these imprints: Center Street (enriching & life-affirming fiction & non-fiction) FaithWords (inspirational, faith-building fiction & non-fiction) Grand Central Publishing (mainstream fiction & non-fiction) Little, Brown and Company (mainstream fiction & non-fiction) Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (fiction & non-fiction for children & young adults) Mulholland Books (mystery & suspense) Orbit (science fiction & fantasy).”

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Keith Richards Loves Libraries

Last Friday, Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards made an appearance at the New York Public Library to talk about his new memoir, Life.

People had stood in line since 8 a.m. for the event. Each ticket purchase included a signed copy of the book.

Richards revealed a lifelong love for libraries. He jokingly pointed out that it was one of the few places where even he obeyed the rules (i.e. silence).

He explained: “To me, it was a place you got a hint that may be there was a thing called civilization … It was a place I went to find out things I wanted to find out about.”

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NYPL Installs First Espresso Book Machine

Yesterday morning, the first Espresso Book Machine was installed and demonstrated at the New York Public Library‘s Science, Industry, and Business Library (SIBL), located on 188 Madison Avenue. The EBM will be available to the public at SIBL through August, and will operate Monday through Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m through Friday, September 7. This fall, the New Orleans Public Library, the University of Alberta, the Northshire Bookstore in Manchester, Vermont, and the Open Content Alliance in San Francisco will all get their own EBMs, reports EndGadget.

One who is especially pleased to be involved is Jason Epstein, co-founder of On Demand Books and a former publishing bigwig at Random House. “Printed books are one of history’s greatest and most enduring inventions, and after centuries, their form needs no improvement,” said Epstein in a statement about EBM’s launch. “What does need to change is the outdated way that books reach readers.” Kristin McDonough, Robert and Joyce Menschel Director of SIBL added: “The Science, Industry and Business Library is delighted to showcase the Espresso Book Machine. The Espresso provides a convenient new approach to book publishing and information dissemination and we are pleased to provide our users with the first opportunity to see this new technology demonstrated at a library whose mission is to support innovation and new business ventures.”

Random House’s Longest-Serving Editor Is Feted

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After reading Dinitia Smith‘s story about Robert Loomis, who’s just turned 80 and has spent a record 50 years as an editor at Random House, I feel very red-faced. Because Korda, Mayhew, Mehta and Gottlieb are names that trip easily off my publishing-wonk tongue, but Loomis? Alas, my industry vocabulary hadn’t included him – until now. But then, he’s an editor of the classic mold, content to stay in the background and let the spotlight shine upon authors such as William Styron, Calvin Trillin, Edmund Morris, Maya Angelou, Shelby Foote, Jonathan Harr and Pete Dexter.

“About 25 years ago, I began to think, ‘I’m a stick in the mud,’” Loomis told an audience of close to a hundred – including many of the authors he helped launch to stardom – in the trustees room of the New York Public Library last week, at a tribute celebrating his 50 years at Random House. “‘Why wasn’t I moving on?’” Why wasn’t he like so many other editors jumping from house to house in search of bigger, better opportunities? Because, simply put, he loved his authors too much, and if one needed years to write a book, he’d wait patiently for the finished product. But as for the retirement question, Loomis is quick to shrug it aside. “It makes people nervous.” He will always be attached to Random House, he said.

Publishing Unbound, Google-Style

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A crowd more than 300-strong gathered at the New York Public Library‘s Celeste Bartos Room for Google‘s all-day Unbound conference to be told, in no uncertain terms by an array of speakers, that if you’re not moving with the digital times, you’re just not a 21st century publisher. I paraphrase, of course, but that was certainly the vibe in the air what with Seth Godin comparing publishers to outlying planets, Cory Doctorow (on the fiction side) and Daniel Weiss (on the educational side) explaining why giving content away is a good thing, and Tim O’Reilly advocating for Google Book Search as a way of capturing the almost 75% of books that aren’t accounted for by not being in print or in the public domain.

Aside from Godin and Doctorow, Chris Anderson was on hand to give an abbreviated spiel of his bestselling THE LONG TAIL, Stephen Dubner (of Freakonomics fame) talked about how the related website – now a blog with additional content features – brings in over 2 million page views a month, and J.A. Konrath stressed the importance of having “things to offer” instead of “things to sell” on an author website. But the big hit of the afternoon – at least, judging by applause – was Josh Kilmer-Purcell, who used Powerpoint in hilarious fashion to describe how MySpace hooked him up with fellow members of the Memoirist Collective. And for those who need help interpreting the slide, Kilmer-Purcell illustrated how his book, I AM NOT MYSELF THESE DAYS, was published by HarperPerennial, which is part of HarperCollins, which is owned by Rupert Murdoch, who owns “half the world” – and when the Judith Regan graphic cued up, the room erupted in laughter…

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