InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Paul Aiken’

Google & Publishers Settle After Seven Years

After seven years of litigation, the Association of American Publishers (AAP) and Google today have reached a settlement so Google can continue to “provide access” to books digitized through its Google Library Project.

Authors Guild executive director Paul Aiken weighed in with this statement: “The publishers’ private settlement, whatever its terms, does not resolve the authors’ copyright infringement claims against Google. Google continues to profit from its use of millions of copyright-protected books without regard to authors’ rights, and our class-action lawsuit on behalf of U.S. authors continues.”

With the new agreement, publishers can choose to include and sell copies of eBooks digitized through the Google Library Project in the Google Play marketplace. The publishers involved in the suit are McGraw-Hill Companies; Pearson’s Pearson Education and Penguin Group (USA); John Wiley & Sons and Simon & Schuster.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Novel Writing: Editing Your Draft

Novel Writing: Editing Your DraftStarting July 16, workshop your novel in-progress with a published author! Erika Mailman's course will function as a workshop, with the emphasis on sharing your work for review and providing critiques for your peers. By the end of this class you'll have up to 75 pages of you novel workshopped and developed patterns to improve your writing. Register now! 

Authors Guild Catalogs Amazon’s ‘Baldly Anticompetitive Practices’

Authors Guild executive director Paul Aiken has sent the Department of Justice a lengthy attack on Amazon’s “baldly anticompetitive practices,” the Guild’s official response to the DOJ’s eBook price fixing lawsuit.

The Guild’s letter argued that Amazon’s “approach to destroying competition is sophisticated, data-driven, and endlessly creative.” It criticized the anticompetitive nature of Amazon’s buy button threats, its move into the on-demand publishing space, its public library lending policies, its Kindle Lending Library development and its “Balkanization of the Literary Marketplace.” Here’s an excerpt:

Even more troubling is the competitive impact statement’s failure to discuss how Amazon uses its command of the online book market and its deep pool of capital to undermine competition.  The statement doesn’t point out: that Amazon achieved its $9.99 price for e-books from November 2007 through April 2010 (and through today, for many publishers) by selling frontlist titles at a loss, a classic anti-competitive tactic; that Amazon managed to undermine its brick-and-mortar competitors while maintaining profitability by selling only a select set of e-books at its below-cost $9.99 price point, focusing its predation on digital editions of the frontlist hardcover books that attract customers to its brick-and-mortar competitors.

Authors Guild Pushes Back Against Random House on Digital Rights

augui.gifIn a simple, direct statement to members today, Paul Aiken, executive director of the Authors Guild, criticized Random House for the “regrettable” decision to assert control of authors’ digital rights: “E-book rights, under older book contracts, were retained by the authors,” wrote Aiken.

The letter referred to a letter sent by Random House CEO Markus Dohle to agents, laying out the company’s eBook plans. His note asserted control over the digital rights in “the vast majority” of the publisher’s backlist.

Aiken responded: “It’s regrettable and unhelpful that Random House has chosen to try to intimidate authors and agents over these old book contracts. With such a weak legal hand, it would be well advised to stick to its strength — the advantages that its marketing muscle can provide owners of e-book rights. It should also start offering a fair royalty for those rights.”

The letter
also advised writers about their eBook possibilities: “If you have an old book contract in which you haven’t granted e-book rights, patience is likely to pay off. The e-book industry is still young — there’s no need to jump in. And we strongly suspect e-royalty rates are at a low-water mark.”