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Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Tumblr & Twitter Celebrity Kelly Oxford Lands Book Deal

Blogger Kelly Oxford has inked a book deal with two different HarperCollins imprints, It Books and HarperCollinsCanada. Oxford (pictured) writes a popular blog and has over 100,000 Twitter followers.

It Books editorial director Cal Morgan and HarperCollinsCanada nonfiction editor Kate Cassaday acquired the book for their respective imprints.  William Morris Endeavor agent Erin Malone negotiated the deal in a two auctions. Last month Oxford also sold a sitcom about her life to CBS Studios entitled The Mother of All Something. The book and television show will explore her life as a wife and mom.

Here’s more from the release: “Oxford is a wife and mother of three who lives in Calgary. A blogger since the 1990s, she has a wide and growing following on Twitter … In March 2010, she performed alongside Ben Stiller, Ashton Kutcher, Will Ferrell, and other celebrities in A Night of 140 Tweets, a fundraising event for Haitian earthquake relief in LA, which brought together the biggest names on Twitter. Her Tumblr has received more than 2 million hits in the last nine months alone.

‘Writers Needed’ Spam Is Blocked But Evolves into ‘Daily Writing Jobs’ Spam

An army of angry Twitter users blocked and reported “Writers Needed” tweets as spam yesterday–calling out individual Twitter users by name that circulated the advertisements that had spread like wildfire.

Nevertheless, watchdog blogger Victoria Strauss pointed out that the original spam has evolved into “Daily Writing Jobs”  spam. We won’t link to the individual tweets in this post, but you can see the links spreading through this Twitter search.

If you want to block and report writing spammers, just follow this handy guide on Twitter. You can also follow the directions in the Twitter tutorial embedded above–click to enlarge the image.

Author Lindsey Pollak: ‘Twitter Is Crucial’ for Job Seekers

JENNIFER PULLINGER

lindsey112.jpg How useful is Twitter in helping one obtain a job in new media? What about when promoting your book or author platform? Writer Jennifer Pullinger put the question to bestselling author and career expert Lindsey Pollak, one of the speakers at the Mediabistro Career Circus August 4.

“Twitter is crucial because it allows you to create a personalized newsfeed of the thoughts, questions, activities, and opinions of people in the industry you want to join. That information is invaluable for a jobseeker trying to meet people and make a good impression in the industry.”

“Participating in the conversation on Twitter is like attending a conference or networking event all day, every day. If I were looking for a job in new media, I would follow every single person who works in the company or industry I want to join.”

Lindsey Pollak talks about building a meaningful public profile and social presence in her upcoming presentation at Mediabistro Career Circus on August 4 in New York.

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France’s Micro-news of 1906, Digitally Remastered

I’ve told you about publishers using Twitter and the buzz they can generate, and I’ve written about novelists extending their worlds onto microblogs. But here’s a new twist: In the same way that the blog format has been used to republish the diaries of Samuel Pepys and George Orwell, along with Bram Stoker‘s Dracula, one Twitter account is steadily reproducing the early 20th-century newspaper dispatches in miniature that Félix Fénéon collected in Novels in Three Lines, recently reissued by New York Review Books.

This isn’t an NYRB project, though: The idea was hatched by Brooklyn-based writer Kio Stark, who started posting bits of Fénéon’s short-short-short reportage last week with the approval of the publisher and Luc Sante, who translated the book from the French. (One recent example: “A criminal virago, Mlle. Tulle, was sentenced by the Rouen court to ten years’ hard labor, while her lover got five.”) “It’s a brilliant idea,” NYRB managing editor Sara Kramer told me when I emailed her looking for the backstory. “I only wish we had thought of it.”

AvantGuild: Will Twitter Followers Become Book Readers?

Back in January, mediabistro.com ran an article on blogging to promote your book; now Jen A. Miller has written an article for the site about microblogging to raise your profile as an author. On the advice of a marketing consultant, Miller created a Twitter account before The Jersey Shore: Atlantic City to Cape May came out. “Since then,” she says, “I’ve gained almost 200 followers, doubled my blog traffic, Twittered about being caught in a nor’easter… that was then linked to on local media blogs, and even driven to a fellow Twitterer’s office to sell her a copy of my book.” She also hears from other writers with similar success stories, with the usual caveat that you don’t go in there to hard-sell the book—as with any of these online tools, as I’ve noted all along, you use the tools to demonstrate that you have something compelling to say, and let people discover your book through discovering you.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for $59 a year, and start reading those articles, receive discounts on mediabistro.com seminars and workshops, and get all sorts of other swell bonuses.

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