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Posts Tagged ‘Lindsay Goldwert’

Our 13 Biggest Stories of 2013

front-page-woman

And you can thank PR for that “scoop” too, buddy

This is the second half of our “26 Biggest Stories of 2013″ countdown, so now’s the time to catch up if you missed the first 13.

These stories were strange, funny and even (gasp) controversial! We hope you enjoy re-reading them—or checking them out for the first time—as much as we enjoyed writing them.

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Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

Hack Turned Flack: Former NYT Editor/Current PR Pro Weighs In

Get the scoop, see?

Here’s something we wish we’d found earlier. For the past 11 months Gorkana, provider of database and analytics services designed for both sides of the PR/media equation, has run a series on its company blog called “Moving to the Darkside” in which media professionals describe making the transition into public relations. A month ago they featured our own contributor Lindsay Goldwert, and for their most recent post they spoke to former New York Times assistant metro editor Nicole Collins Bronzan.

This one is particularly interesting because Bronzan previously represented gay rights group Freedom to Marry and now works as director of communications for non-profit investigative journalism organization ProPublica, whose revealing stories about corporate misdeeds feel designed to make PR people sweat.

Here’s a key quote about journalists considering a career change:

…many people turn to PR as an easy out – and give the profession a bad name – without really considering whether some whole other career would make more sense for them. In a nutshell: If you see PR as a “way out,” take a little time and think more deeply about it.

Don’t hear that point made often, do you? The whole series is well worth a look.

Hack to Flack: How Being a Good Journalist Will Make You a Better PR Pro

Today we’re very glad to bring you another guest post by Lindsay Goldwert, a senior program executive at Hotwire PR who jumped into the field after performing editorial duties for New York Daily News, ABCNews.com, CBSNews.com, CourtTV, Glamour and Redbook. Here’s her previous post on writing better pitches.

I won’t lie — the first two months at my new job were an adjustment.

After spending twelve years as a working journalist, I simply did not know how to operate on the other side. The PR industry’s language confused me; I felt like I was starting over, and it was a scary, unsettling feeling. Most painfully, I was mourning the loss of a career path. It hadn’t treated me all that well but, frankly, it was was all I knew.

Then again, I hadn’t been doing much real journalism lately. Wasn’t that why I quit in the first place?

I turned a corner a few weeks ago and, for the first time in many years, I’m experiencing the warm glow of possibility. It’s a good feeling to leave a shrinking, scrambling, panicking field for one that’s growing, experimenting and writing its own rules for success. Ideas are valued. Insight is appreciated. Your time is money. Industry knowledge is gold.

For others who are contemplating a career shift, I offer these reasons why you may feel extremely valued in the PR field (and not just for your media contacts):

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5 Ways for Journalists to Build Better Relationships with PR Pros

Yesterday our friend and PR veteran Peter Himler wrote a Forbes article with an intriguing headline: “The Journalist and the PR Pro: A Broken Marriage?” Given the chatter over Monday’s guest post by a former journalist turned PR master, we thought we’d explore the idea a little further.

Himler’s main point: a significant number of the students in the journalism program where he spoke last week don’t want to write for The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal–they want to go into PR and advertising. They want to write sponsored content, not investigative journalism. Of course this makes sense, because journalism can be a very tough and often underpaid pursuit.

Himler, like many in the industry, believes that the always-challenging relationship between hacks like us and pitchmen/women has taken a turn for the worse. Yet we agree with his conclusion: this marriage may be strained, but it’s hardly broken.

On Monday Lindsay Goldwert called on her journalist friends to make a list of “do’s and dont’s” for PR pros. Himler’s piece includes both sides of the equation, so we’d like to flip the script: how should journalists and bloggers interact with PR folks? Himler’s suggestions and our comments after the jump:

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Hack to Flack: A Former Journalist’s Guide to Better PR Pitches

Today we’re happy to bring you a guest post by Lindsay Goldwert, a senior program executive at a global tech PR firm. Before she leapt to the dark side, Lindsay worked at the New York Daily News, ABCNews.com, CBSNews.com, CourtTV, Glamour and Redbook. In her spare time, she writes short stories.

As a communications vet who’s worn both the “journalism” and “PR” hats, she provides us with a very unique take on the delicate dance that we call “media relations.” Enjoy!

I have a confession: until very recently I was a working journalist–and I was very cruel to PR people.

Who could blame me? Tasked with writing and producing “life & style” content for the New York Daily News’s bustling website, I could not be bothered with endless email pitches that had nothing to do with my beat. I got snippy when people called to ask me if I had received their e-mail, yet every time I cleared my inbox it managed to fill up again within the hour.

By mid-morning every day, I already had a slate of content to work on–most of it stories that bounced off the day’s news. Yet PR people still called me (always when I was on deadline) to ask whether I might have time for a desk-side client interview or a three-hour lunch event.

Didn’t they know that, as a digital reporter, I never left my desk? Soon, I didn’t just ignore emails from PR people — I deleted them en masse without reading them. Eventually, I got so frustrated with the ill-timed telephone calls that I just stopped picking up my phone altogether.

Sound familiar?

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Keep it Light When Pitching Lifestyle Media

“People want to wake up and laugh,” observed Joe Pardavila, producer of WPLJ-FM’s The Big Show With Scott & Todd. Aside from humor, stories that make people feel good also stand a better chance of breaking into the lifestyle sections of media websites, radio and television shows. That was the consensus at a panel that included Pardavila and other editors and producers from the lifestyle beat.

They appeared at a Publicity Club of New York event on Wednesday featuring New York Daily News’ website, Fox 5’s Good Day New York, HuffPost Women and BuzzFeed Shift. The panelists advised on pitching tips and faux pas to avoid.

Since New York is a market saturated with news and events, the local media outlets emphasized that the bar is high for what will capture the audience’s interest. As Lindsay Goldwert, editor at New York Daily News website’s Living section cautioned, their stories need to pass the “Get out!” or “Seriously?” test.

All five speakers also provided a snapshot of their media brands.

Good Day New York airs for 5.5 hours in the morning. “They’re all local segments, and they run the spectrum,” executive producer Jason Hartelius explained. So don’t send him invites to cover an event in Alaska, as recently happened. Instead, send pitches with catchy subject lines, such as “Hugh Laurie trades his stethoscope for a piano” as a heads-up that the actor is performing in concert in New Jersey.

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