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Posts Tagged ‘Tricia Primrose Wallace’

AOL Hires Hurvitz for Top Comms Spot

Lauren Hurvitz fills the vacancy at AOL left by 13-year veteran Tricia Primrose Wallace as head of corporate communications, beginning October 13th.  Primrose’s departure became known when AllThingsD published CEO Tim Armstrong’s memo in June.

Hurvitz was previously EVP of corporate communications and public affairs at MTV.  She left in 2008 after three years at the network.

She joins at an interesting time at the old-guard Internet company. Following layoffs earlier this year, Aol rebranded, and put considerable force and resources behind its content, including the hyperlocal Patch sites, the user-generated Seed sites, and has recently acquired Michael Arrington’s TechCrunch.

RELATEDAOL Comm. Director Kurt Patat Joins MTV


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TechCrunch Calls Aol. PR Clueless

triciaprimrosewallace.jpg

TechCrunch reporter Erick Schonfeld is not happy. He has a scoop last week that Aol chief technology officer Ted Cahall was about to leave the company. He tried to confirm this with Aol PR, who denied the move.

“No, he is not leaving,” Aol executive vice president of communications Tricia Primrose Wallace [pictured] told him at the time. Of course, this week, the company did a one-eighty and announced Cahall’s departure.

Schonfeld is annoyed because Aol PR fed him incorrect information. Aol PR should have declined to comment or simply not have returned Schonfeld’s email, two options which the reporter himself called, “perfectly appropriate.” We can only assume they chose not to, as “decline to comment” often indicates to a reporter that he or she is on to something.

However, once they began commenting, especially given that the information turned out to be false, they implicated themselves in the story. PRNewser reached out to Primrose Wallace who declined to comment further on the matter.

RELATED: AOL EVP of Comm. Earned $400,000+ in 2008