GalleyCat AppNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Ethan Klapper

Fighting the Distractions of Consuming News on Tablets

An interesting article about e-books and our digital culture was on the front page of the New York Times the other day. “Finding Your Book Interrupted … By the Tablet You Read It On,” read the headline.

The article detailed how people who read e-books are frequently distracted by the other apps that are loaded on their iPads, Kindle Fires and Samsung Galaxys:

E-mail lurks tantalizingly within reach. Looking up a tricky word or unknown fact in the book is easily accomplished through a quick Google search. And if a book starts to drag, giving up on it to stream a movie over Netflix or scroll through your Twitter feed is only a few taps away.

Well, in my experience, this is not a problem unique to e-books on tablets. It’s a challenge for any news publisher to compete for a reader’s attention on a device with so many other apps that are simultaneously competing for a reader’s attention (and sending push alerts to let the reader know that). Read more

Why You Should Apply to the 2012 ONA Conference Student Newsroom

Applications are now being accepted for the 2012 Online News Association conference student newsroom.

The student newsroom provides college and graduate students the opportunity to attend the ONA conference, free of charge. Also included is transportation and lodging costs (compliments of Google). This year, the conference will be held in San Francisco.

In exchange, students cover the conference for its website. Coverage can mean traditional written stories, photos, video and interactives. I believe last year they even had students whose specialty was coding.

Let me speak from my personal experience as a member of the 2010 ONA conference student newsroom: If you’re a student with any interest in Web journalism, apply. If you’re a college professor, encourage your students to apply. If you’re a professional journalist reading this blog who happens to have kids in j-school, encourage them to apply. Read more

Knight News Challenge Accepting Entries Via Tumblr

Entries for the first of three 2012 Knight News Challenges opened on Monday, with a twist: This year’s application form is being hosted on Tumblr.

The theme of this challenge, with $5 million total in grant money, is networks. In this context, that means:

Witness the roles of networks in the formation, coverage and discussion of recent events such as the rise of the Tea Party, flash mobs, the Arab Spring, last summer’s UK riots and the Occupy movement. We’re looking for ideas that build on the rise of these existing network events and tools – that deliver news and information and extend our understanding of the phenomenon.

The Tumblr will be used for others to offer support, and critiques, for the entries. The entrance form is simplified this year, asking only 7 questions (and requiring succinct answers), ranging from “What do you propose to do?” (20 words maximum) to “How would you sustain the project after the funding expires?” (50 words maximum).

Entries appear on the homepage of the Tumblr. Within hours of the Tumblr going live, 14 entries were already posted and displayed prominently on the homepage, underscoring the popularity of the News Challenge.

The News Challenge is a major source of grant money for journalism-related projects. Last year, prizes ranged from $10,000 to $1 million. The average prize was $294,000. Past winners include Document Cloud and ScraperWiki.

In keeping with their use of social media this year, the challenge’s organizers will host a Google+ hangout tomorrow (Wednesday) at 1 p.m. ET to answer any questions.

Applications will be accepted until March 17.

Below is a video that explains more about the Knight News Challenge.

Knight News Challenge 2012 from Knight Foundation on Vimeo.

Washington Post Launches Personalized News Aggregator Personal Post

The Washington Post this week launched Personal Post, a news aggregator that suggests Post stories based on a user’s browsing habits on washingtonpost.com.

It uses the technology that powers Trove, an aggregator that was built by the paper last year. Trove aggregates headlines from around the Web, and not just washingtonpost.com.

My initial suggestions upon loading Personal Post up for the first time were accurate for someone like me who lives in the Washington area and happens to work in the political media: Post Local, Crime, PostPolitics, Opinions, and Erik Wemple (a media critic at the Post). Read more

Online Journalism in 1981 (VIDEO)

Above is one of my favorite videos about online journalism — a 1981 television report from KRON-TV in the San Francisco Bay Area. It shows how, through a special service, people were able to dial into servers and download the day’s newspaper.

How long does it take to download the newspaper? Well, over 2 hours (after all, the modems shown require the user to physically place a telephone handset on top of them).

It speaks of eight newspapers who had online versions available at the time: the Columbus Dispatch, The New York Times, the Virginian-Pilot & Ledger Star, The Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the San Francisco Examiner, the Los Angeles Times and the Minneapolis Star and Tribune. Read more

NEXT PAGE >>