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Maurice Cherry

Learn To Code Today with Google Code University

Google Code logo

Journalists, what are some of your New Year’s resolutions? If one of them happens to be “learn to code”, then search engine titan Google has you covered with Google Code University.

There are many reasons that journalists should learn how to code. Like we’ve stated before here on 10,000 Words, coding skills are an essential part of working in a new media environment. A knowledge of HTML, CSS and JavaScript gives you the tools you need to create your own website, and can make you a valuable resource for any news organization. Not only that, several journalism fellowships and trainee programs are looking for journalists with programming knowledge. You can have the skills to apply for an opportunity to receive funding for your own cutting edge journalism projects.

Google Code University (GCU) does not require any registration, and materials are free to use. In Web Programming, for example, there are lectures, videos, and contributed course content to teach users how to create interactive web applications that go beyond your basic static web page.

Here are just a few of the courses GCU offers:

  • Python
  • C++
  • Java
  • CSS, HTML and JavaScript
  • HTML5
  • Web Security
  • Algorithms
  • Android Application Development
  • Introduction to Databases and MySQL

Computer science educators are also welcome to submit their own coursework for inclusion within GCU. All courses will be placed under a Creative Commons license which will allow for people to reuse and modify the courses for their own curriculum as necessary. And if you’re looking for more curriculum to peruse or get stuck on a particular term, GCU also includes a search feature via Google Directory that includes lectures, assignments, papers and videos from schools like Harvard University, Duke University, and Carnegie Mellon University.

GCU is a part of Google Code’s education resources, which also include Google DocType and the popular HTML5 Rocks website. To get started today, visit http://code.google.com/edu.

Apply Today for the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship

Spencer Fellows Logo

If you are a journalist, an educator, or a researcher who wants to work on projects about the American education system, then you should check out the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship from the Columbia Journalism School. This fellowship is dedicated to supporting long-form journalism that deepens and enhances the public’s understanding of the American education system, according to the Spencer Fellows website.

“The fellowship is designed to elevate the level of education reporting by giving writers the time and resources they so desperately need in today’s environment of tight deadlines and space limitations to produce a long-form work of lasting value that will trigger a national conversation on the status of education in America,” said LynNell Hancock, the program’s curriculum director.

The Columbia Journalism School has granted these particular fellowships since 2008, and Spencer Fellows have gone on to produce groundbreaking journalism on the American education system, such as Alexander Russo’s novel Stray Dogs, Saints and Saviors: Fighting for the Soul of America’s Toughest High School and Nancy Solomon’s radio documentary “Mind the Gap: Why Good Schools are Failing Black Students”, a 2010 Peabody Award winner.

Spencer Fellows will spend the upcoming academic year at Columbia University studying with other scholars and with mentors in the Journalism School. Three fellowships will be awarded, each with an annual stipend of $75,000 and a modest travel expense account. The program is highly competitive, and the deadline for applications is January 31, 2012. Successful applicants will be notified by April 5.

For more information about the program, and to apply for the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship, visit the Spencer Fellows website at http://spencer.jrn.columbia.edu.

Apply Today For The Reuters Journalism Trainee Program

Thomson Reuters Logo

The Reuters Journalism Trainee Program is currently seeking candidates for their 2012 initiative. “The Reuters Journalism Trainee Program will bring together a talented group of journalists and journalists-to-be from around the world and provide them with nine months of intensive classroom training and hands-on, real-world experience in London, New York and Singapore”, according to an announcement on the Reuters website.

“Trainees will be paid during the program and then moved into staff positions provided performance standards are met. And they’ll be assigned to mentors to help guide their career with Reuters.”

Reuters currently employs over 3,000 journalists in 200 bureaus worldwide. This year, the London-based Trainee Program has expanded to include New York and Asia, which ups the stakes for being accepted into the highly competitive program. Trainees will get experience both in the classroom and on the newsroom floor, and Reuters will offer 15 jobs for trainees that successfully complete the program according to Stephen Adler, Reuters editor-in-chief.

While the program is geared towards journalists, you don’t necessarily need to be a journalist in order to apply. Reuters is looking for recent graduates, working journalists, or anyone with a specialist background that is looking to start a new career with the world’s largest international multimedia news provider. Applicants must be fluent in English, although advanced proficiency with another language is a plus. Expertise in data analysis and programming, as well as a visual eye and experience with multimedia, are definite advantages for applicants.

Applications are due on December 31, 2011 for the Reuters Journalism Trainee Program. To apply, visit the Reuters website at http://careers.thomsonreuters.com/Students/Bachelors-Masters/Europe/Reuters-Journalism-Trainee for more information.

Publishing Your News Content to Google Currents

Google Currents

Here on 10,000 Words, we’ve shown you a few tips on how to define your newsroom’s mobile presence, as well as some other helpful tips for reaching news junkies on the second screen. A recent report from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism showed that 53% of tablet owners are daily news consumers. And while the iPad still dominates the tablet marketplace, Android tablets are popping up all over the place this holiday season from manufacturers like HTC, Motorola, and Samsung. Even Amazon has recently entered the fray with their own Android-powered tablet device: the Kindle Fire. Google continues their rapid-fire push into the tablet arena with their latest application: Google Currents.

Google Currents allows users to browse their favorite magazines, newspapers and websites in an attractive and elegant format. Google has joined with over 150 publishing partners to offer content, including Saveur, Popular Science, Fast Company, ProPublica, Forbes, The Atlantic, and more. Consumers have over 180 editions of formatted content to choose from once they download the app to their Android or iOS device. But the best thing about Google Currents is that anyone can create their editions for the app. Google has created an intuitive self-service platform that gives you the ability to customize, brand and style your Google Currents edition to match your organization or website. (Note: the Google Currents app is only available in the US, but users worldwide can create their own editions.)

Create a new edition

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Tool of the Day: Google Correlate

When it comes to search, Google reigns supreme. Millions of searches are conducted on a daily basis, and that sort of data is valuable to marketers, business people, and journalists as well. We’ve all seen the annual Google Zeitgeist data visualizations which show lists like the most used search queries and the fastest rising celebrities. Earlier this year, Google released Google Correlate, a tool that can mine similar patterns in search data terms.


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