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Before You Sign That Book Contract

It’s finally happened: Your journalism and technology savvy have led to a print book deal. But before you jump to sign that contract, take a moment to read it thoroughly. Bets are, it won’t have your best interest at heart; hidden in the fine print are some common clauses that might kill your future prospects. For example:

The exclusivity clause. This clause states that you could not do any writing related to your book. That’s insane, especially for writers who work in the areas they write about.

“Writers have to make a living, and only rarely does a book contract offer enough money for a writer to meet living expenses without taking on other work,” said Meg Schnieder, an Iowa-based author of 12 books, including The Everything Guide to Writing a Book Proposal.

Find other potential deal breakers and steps to renegotiation in The 7 Biggest Red Flags in Book Contracts.

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