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books

NY Women In Communications Panel: ‘Where Is The Print Industry Going?’

Print-Vs-Digital

Dow Jones recently hosted a panel discussion presented by New York Women In Communications. The topic: Where is the print industry going?

The panel was moderated by Rebecca Blumenstein, deputy editor-in-chief of the Wall Street Journal, while the panelists included: Susan Schulz, editorial brand director, CosmopolitanAna Maria Allessi, vice president, digital innovation & publisher of HarperAudio at HarperCollins and Julie Zhu, director of digital circulation marketing for Barron’s and MarketWatch.

The hour-long discussion touched on a myriad of topics, including branding, print vs. digital and the struggles of online advertising. Here, a few snippets from the conversation between three media heavyweights:

Allessi, on the evolution of eBooks: “eBooks are extremely popular. They continue to grow and be a huge percentage of units sold. But we have seen it start to level out. I would guess we’re all reading a little bit more. We have something to read in our pockets at all times now.”

Schulz, on Cosmopolitan‘s digital crossover: “The whole digital thing has really opened up an opportunity for [Cosmo], if we would just see it that way. There are still people that are nervous about it. I think it’s because we’re just at the beginning, we haven’t seen it all play out yet. There’s much more of a melding of this idea that you’re not a print editor or a web editor, you’re an editor.” Read more

An Optimistic Look at the Future of Journalism in George Brock’s ‘Out of Print’

gb1As the holiday season approaches, you might find yourself looking for reading material to give as a gift, or curl up with on some possible days off (I like to think we get time off. Just roll with it). A good choice would be Out of Print, part textbook, part commentary, by George Brock, head of City University’s graduate school of journalism in London, as well as ex-journo for the Times and Observer.

It’s an unsentimental look at the fall of the “golden age” of newspapers as much as it is an optimistic take on the future of the news business. Read more

3 Journalism-y Things You Should Add to Your Reading List

s&sFacts of life: writers can’t be great unless they constantly write (practice makes perfect), and writers won’t be inspired to write unless they read. We should be reading everything: historical biographies, crappy fiction, beautiful prose, intricately-woven nonfiction narratives — and don’t forget, we should be reading the work of people who are smarter than us when it comes to digital innovation and journalism.

Here are just a few newer pieces of literary work I’ve been (and will be) digging into and would recommend for writers and reporters:

Read more

Score That Job: Hachette Book Group

Do you have the New York Times Best Seller list memorized? Do you have a passion for books and want to get into the publishing business?

In this episode of “Score That Job,” career expert, author and mediabistro editor Vicki Salemi sat down with Andrea Weinzimer of Hachette Book Group to get the inside dirt on what they’re looking for in a candidate.

Here a few tips — know the industry and know which authors they publish (hint: rhymes with James Patterson, Nicholas Sparks, David Sedaris…). Or just watch the video.

You can view our other MediabistroTV productions on our YouTube Channel.

Before You Sign That Book Contract

It’s finally happened: Your journalism and technology savvy have led to a print book deal. But before you jump to sign that contract, take a moment to read it thoroughly. Bets are, it won’t have your best interest at heart; hidden in the fine print are some common clauses that might kill your future prospects. For example:

The exclusivity clause. This clause states that you could not do any writing related to your book. That’s insane, especially for writers who work in the areas they write about.

“Writers have to make a living, and only rarely does a book contract offer enough money for a writer to meet living expenses without taking on other work,” said Meg Schnieder, an Iowa-based author of 12 books, including The Everything Guide to Writing a Book Proposal.

Find other potential deal breakers and steps to renegotiation in The 7 Biggest Red Flags in Book Contracts.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

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