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Link Roundup

Friday Roundup: The Week in Journalism

huffpostAPtweet.jpgIf anyone complained about dog days of summer in the newsroom, this week you got what you wished for. Here are some highlights in all of the chaos that was the news this week:

1) You can’t win if you’re covering Gaza. John Stewart illustrated this best in a skit on Monday night. And the New York Observer called out the New York Times for what it thinks is biased coverage of recent events. The ‘paper of record’ doesn’t think it’s doing anything wrong. What about you? How have you been staying objective — or have you decided to ditch that effort?

BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash lands in Eindhoven.

— The Associated Press (@AP) July 23, 2014

2) A lot of us need to read slower and learn AP style. On Tuesday, the AP tweeted about a plane carrying the victims of flight MH17. AP style is “crash-landed,” anyway, but a lot of us journos need to slow down. It was like we were waiting to start a fight with them. Read more

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Seize Your Moment, Trolls: It’s Time to Pay Attention to Net Neutrality

I would have bet that John Oliver could make net neutrality interesting (the bit with OITNB and the mob shakedown might be my favorite part), but I was surprised that his monologue resulted in a temporary breakdown of the comment system over at the FCC by the internet commenting “monsters.”

And thank goodness for those monsters — they’re loud, annoying, and have more than enough time to watch CSPAN and read transcripts of FCC hearings on the open internet. They’re piggish, perhaps, but they are (sometimes, always when it comes to their internet connection) informed. Read more

Link Round Up: The Only Things You Need to Read About Jill Abramson and the NYT

timestattooAre you exhausted, too? It’s been over a week and I finally stopped reading every piece of commentary, reporting, and bloviating over Jill Abramson’s termination and the general mess over at the New York Times. How many keys have been clicked over the fate of equal pay and digital innovation? How many hours thumbing through a Twitter feed? A lot. Luckily for you, whether you can’t stop obsessing over it or were too swamped to care, I managed to find a few gems.

Here are the must reads so you can hold your end of a conversation on the matter at your Memorial Day barbeque with all your media minded friends (because you know everyone you know works in the biz, too, right?).

Mathew Ingram over at GigaOM always has good insight on all things digital and in this piece he manages to see a bigger problem below the noise about the executive changes over at the Grey Lady. Conclusion? The Times‘ problems are real, and Baquet likes print a little too much. Now is not the time for nostalgia. Here’s hoping.

And then there was solidarity and humor. Another self described “bossy lady,Kara Swisher, penned a post last weekend about what it means to be a “pushy” woman in media and how the Times bungled the whole ordeal. And this:

Let me see if I can say it more simply than Sulzberger: She was a real pain in my ass and so she had to go. I can relate, to say the least. As one of the few top editors in tech journalism who is a woman and, even from my many years of reporting before that, I cannot tell you the number of times that I have been called a pain in the ass for my aggressive manner. Silly me, but that kind of tonality is exactly what makes for a successful journalist — you know, afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted — and what is more often than not needed in the sometimes rough-and-tumble world of media.

Newly appointed editor over at Fusion Margarita Noriega had a reaction similar to mine — and even if you’re sick of reading about Abramson, this (and all of her tweets and tiny posts) are required reading if you want to be my friend. “Hey media, get a clue,” sums everything up. And has good Larry David GIFs.

Lastly, if you insist on delving into it (which is probably a decent idea), read only the analysis by Ken Doctor and the summary of that leaked (printed!) innovation report over at Nieman Lab.

Your welcome. I’m going to take a much needed unofficial start of summer weekend break from Twitter and the future of digital newsrooms, now. I’ve had enough.

Image via The Cut

Social Networks and Digital Publishing: Friday Link Round-Up

eulogyfortwitterAh, it’s Friday and finally nice out. Which is why I plan on catching up on all the good links and stories I had to breeze through during the work week. Somewhere outdoors, facing the sun, preferably with a morning coffee. Here are some social media themed links I’ve been thinking about this week; tweet us @10,000Words or comment with articles you think we should catch up on this weekend.

1) I saw that this conversation was going on, but couldn’t bring  myself to get buried in it. Until now. The Atlantic’s ‘Eulogy for Twitter‘ makes some interesting points, though I think media people tend to get caught up, as if Twitter has to be the same for everyone. Maybe it’s just not for journalists anymore, but that’s pretty ridiculous, too.  The point about Twitter a catalyst, like AOL was for email, is something to chew on alongside your Sunday bagel. If Twitter’s dying, someone tell the White House, who is obviously stressing way too much about it.

2) I only log into into LinkedIn when my train’s delayed and I’ve become bored with Twitter (well, now…). I notice that they’ve sent me  a bunch of email notifications,  go in to clean up the mess and see who viewed my profile, as if it were some freemium dating service. But I digress — turns out there are a lot of people like me, which is why this Quartz piece says that LinkedIn is still focusing on being a content site. But a newspaper?

3) I hate to toot our own horn, but this Angela Washeck post on Facebook newswire lays out its plans and asks some good questions. It’s made entirely possible with Storyful, which means, how is it better than Storyful or even a well curated Twitter newsfeed?

So what did we miss out on this week? What are your weekend reading plans?

Image credit: The Atlantic.

Spring Link Roundup: Clickbait, and Other Things We Should Stop Worrying About

springcleaning.jpgNow that we’ve made it through April Fool’s Day and the #HIMYM finale safely, it officially feels like spring. Since nothing is worse than cleaning, spring or otherwise, I prefer to take a long, hard look at my clutter. Whether its three pairs of the same Converse sneaker or media industry fallacies, we need to sort through and keep, throw away, and donate accordingly.

Here are a few ideas circling my Twitter feed that I think we need to deal with.

KEEP: The Idea that ‘Clickbait’ Isn’t a Dirty Word Read more

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