GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

writing

New York Times Steps Up Political News Presence

New-York-Times-Logo1Today the Grey Lady launched a politics-themed email newsletter and micro-site underneath the Times‘ main site called First Draft.

First Draft is a piggyback on Washington-centric blog The Caucus, which hasn’t seen much consistent action. As the Times‘ Carl Hulse told the Huffington Post, the new site will house an ongoing political dialogue, written in a similar voice as the paper’s NYT Now app’s morning and evening briefings. Additionally, First Draft will feature both original scoops (that may be developed into full stories for the newspaper later on) as well as aggregated content.

So far, the blog features pull quotes from political figures, videos and even a curated Instagram photo of Cory Booker. Content runs the gamut, as events dictate coverage, though it is definitely an informal take on a sometimes dry topic. As HuffPo’s Michael Calderone wrote: “The Times plans to update First Draft frequently, with hopes that political news junkies will return throughout the day.”

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot CampStarting November 3, learn how to develop a plan for your book's success in Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp! In this intensive boot camp, you'll hear from publishing and PR experts how to master the publicity skills needed to ensure a successful book launch using various promotional techniques. Register before October 3 to get $50 OFF with early bird pricing. Register now!

Grading the Media on Ferguson Coverage

Now that the Ferguson protests are slowly beginning to wind down, it’s likely a good time to assess how the media handled the coverage of the recent unrest, triggered by the police shooting of unarmed teen, Michael Brown.

From the coverage I’ve seen myself, I would have to grade the media a C to C-, mainly for coverage that I thought was uneven, at best, with some national reporters even crossing journalistic lines to become advocates, rather than unbiased, objective third-parties. Read more

How Should Publishers Assign Value to Writers?

SIAmong all the highly complicated questions media companies are grappling with, Time Inc. is still in a seriously unique transitional period. But when Gawker reported that the publisher — more specifically, Sports Illustrated magazine — scores its editorial writers based on how much they benefit the respective magazine’s advertiser relationships, it was a bit hard for me to feel sorry for them.

To be fair, that’s not the only thing they’re applying a numerical value to. “Quality of Writing,” “Impact of Stories/Newsworthiness,” “Productivity/Tenacity,” “Audience/Traffic,” “Video,” “Social” and “Enthusiasm/Approach to Work” are all categories that appear on the writers’ scorecards. But “Produces content that [is] beneficial to advertiser relationship” is still there.

Wrote Gawker watchdog reporter Hamilton Nolan:

“(Time Inc. provided this document to the Newspaper Guild, which represents some of their employees, and the union provided it to us.)  These editorial employees were all ranked in this way, with their scores ranging from 2 to 10.”

TimeInc Read more

The News, in 100 Words or Less

abridgemeUh, oh, the sky is falling.

This month, AbridgeME.com launched as the first user-generated summation tool for news articles. Weird timing, right? At a moment when everyone is dedicated to  providing stacks of digital flashcards and explainers for the news, founder Eric Rems wants to cut to the chase.

His reasoning? Everyone explains and comments — just look at your Twitter feed right now and count the links to opinions on the news — and he wants to provide readers with fact based summaries of the news. This way, you can start to delve into the topic with the facts and only the facts. Then you can create your reading adventure across the web and decide for yourself as you dig in rather than start with the editorial and have them choose sides for you.  Read more

ClearVoice Measures and Scores Writers’ Social Influence: How Do You Rank?

imageAnalytics are either your best friend or your worst enemy. And now, there’s a platform to not only track how your work is being shared, but will give you a score. I hate to compare, but ClearVoice, launched in June, is basically a Klout for digital journalists. Anita Malik, Vice President of Content Operations for ClearVoice, says:

There was nothing out there to score content creators and look at what authorship was doing out there in the marketplace and going beyond Google authorship to give brands and publishers a real view of what writers are able to offer in levels of expertise, who’s improving in what area, and who will give them a good voice for their audience.

It works like this: you do a search for your name and the platform pulls up all the indexed sites that you’ve posted on. You claim your work, create a profile, and voila. You have a ClearVoice score. The hope is that you can use that to coerce and editor into paying you more, find more tailored gigs if you’re a freelancer, or just brag to the guy in the next cube that you rule. It’s really up to you how you use it.  Read more

NEXT PAGE >>