GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Archives: February 2013

The Sequester: Don’t Get Lost in Translation

This week, there are two very confusing threads of news running through my feeds. The first is the sequester. The other, the elections in Italy.

Navigating politics is like navigating a murky swamp. Unless you’ve been there before, you’re bound to make a mis-step or get lost in the mess.

Luckily, I used to live in Italy and so I can walk myself through the hype and conjecture that runs rampant in the Italian press and straight to the hard news. I also speak American political theater, so I manage just the same with the sequester.

But it’s not easy territory to navigate. Both events have me thinking about how news, especially layered, complex news like budget plans and Italy’s electoral process, get lost in translation, especially through social media and the constant linking to sources as news breaks. Analysis in both cases is lacking as up-to-the-minute updating takes over.

No More Question Marks

If you aren’t mildly confused about the sequester, good for you. Many outlets have focused coverage on breaking it down for readers, but that only does so much good. Other outlets and their columnists seem caught up in the churning out of updates. It’s like trying to follow a 7th grader recounting a drama from the playground. Some writers don’t even seem to be  searching for real facts, or readily accessible plans, opting instead to simply join the peanut gallery. Adult supervision, indeed.

Read more

NYT, Gannett And Others Join AP Suit Against Meltwater

Several of the biggest names in the daily news business joined the AP in its fight against online news clipping service Meltwater News this week. The publishers coming to support AP by filing an amicus brief in its ongoing lawsuit include the New York Times Company, Advance Publications, Gannett, The McClatchy Company and the Newspaper Association of America (which represents 2,000 organizations).

Last year, the Associated Press filed a lawsuit against Meltwater claiming the service — a paid electronic clipping service that monitors and delivers news stories on keyword-specific topics to its paying customers — violated AP copyright and competed directly against AP by illegally selling its content. Since then, the back and forth battle over fair use and what’s fair on the Internet has intensified, with supporters on both sides.

This week, the newspapers weighed in and filed an amicus brief supporting the AP (download the full PDF of the brief, which is worth reading). Here’s their take on the issue and what’s at stake:

It takes no friend-of-the-court brief for the Court to know that the rise of the Internet has been highly disruptive to the nation’s news organizations, as their readers and advertisers have migrated to the Web. In response, the nation’s news organizations, including the amici on this brief, have at considerable expense developed their own Websites and digital businesses to carry their news reports. These digital businesses are supported by electronic advertising revenue, electronic subscription revenue, and licensing income from other publishers and users and aggregators. None of these revenue streams can be sustained if news organizations are unable to protect their news reports from the wholesale copying and redistribution by free-riders like Meltwater.
Read more

Sponsored Content: How Much is Too Much?

The past few months have been a rocky one for sponsored online content or “advertorials.” Between the Atlantic‘s Scientology dust-up and increasing paid content on websites like Buzzfeed and various outlets within the Gawkwer network, publishers are pushing boundaries and blurring the line between editorial and advertisement.

It’s a sticky subject, for sure, and the centerpiece of a Social Media Week debate in Buzzfeed’s Flatiron District office between Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith and conservative blogger and The Dist Andrew Sullivan. To describe the debate as a blood bath is even a little bit of an understatement, as the two personalities clashed vehemently over the advertorial’s place online — and the effect it has on journalism at large. Here’s a quote from the debate moderator, the Atlantic‘s Derek Thompson, from his write-up of the event: Read more

10 ‘Snowfall’-like Projects That Break Out of Standard Article Templates

“Snowfall” has become a verb in many newsrooms after The New York Times launched its beautiful multimedia project earlier this year. Though the format was touted as the future of online storytelling by some, The Times wasn’t the first to pull of this type of format. If you’re looking for inspiration to make snow fall in your own newsroom, here are a few other examples, not all of which come from newsrooms, as I think it would be irresponsible of us to confine ourselves to the sphere of news organizations when collecting inspiration for innovative storytelling formats.

1. Pitchfork: Glitter in the Dark

Favorite feature: Layering multiple shots in the background that change as you scroll, mimicking the action of a photoshoot.

 

2.  ESPN: The Long, Strange Trip of Dock Ellis

Favorite feature: Curtain-style parallax that reveals the next layer of content as you scroll. (Tutorial on how to do this).

Read more

Data Visualizations in the Newsroom

If you consume any political news or watch late night television, Congress has become the punchline of many an editorial or frustrated monologue. But does Congress really suck?

With a data visualization, Nikanth Patel, an Editorial Production Associate at The New Yorker, hopes to help people answer that question. Created in his time away from the office, Patel entered his latest data visualization project “Does Congress Really Suck?” in the BiCoastal Datafest sponsored by Columbia and Stanford Universities, where it won the “Best in Insight” prize.

By aggregating public data into a sleek and interactive interface, Patel’s project allows users to judge Congress through comparisons to past sessions, by following the money trail, and a real-time view of the public’s opinion of Congress on social media.

Why data visualizations? For starters, it makes information easier to consume. Since we have the technology to make data look sleek, even artful, and let readers interact with it, why not? Patel sees data visualizations as just another step in the evolution of the image. Reporters have used pictures, then video, to help tell their story. Why not data visualizations? As long as it’s in context, of course. Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>