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Posts Tagged ‘advice’

A New Space and Time for News

This is a guest post by Zohar Dayan, CEO and co-founder of Wibbitz, which provides automated text-to-video technologies.

video_iphoneThe ubiquity of the smartphone is changing content consumption. The space in which we get our news has narrowed from a newspaper broadsheet to a 4-inch screen, and the time in which we do it has expanded from distinct periods in the day into a constant checking and re-checking of various streams of content.

As the time and the space in which we get our news changes, traditional media needs to adapt fit these new parameters. It’s not only about the format in which we deliver content, but also about the times we choose to deliver it. As a newsreading app, Wibbitz is in a position to notice trends about how and when people like to get their news. We’ve come up with a few tips to help journalists plan and format their content to pull in more readers. Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Woman’s Day Pays up to $2 a Word for Straightforward, Feel-good Writing

womans-day-january-2014Woman’s Day knows that its readers (women ages 30 to 90) are incredibly busy, and they crave easily digestible advice on everything from cooking and home decor to health and money matters.

The editors are looking for writers with a straightforward tone and the ability to do their research before sending a pitch — reading back issues of the mag (at least the past 12 months) is invaluable. Knowing which section to pitch and what type of reader to cater to is also key:

A writer’s best entryway onto the pages of the mag is a front-of-book section called “Embrace the Day,” focused on community and giving to others. It’s a special place in the hearts of Woman’s Day readers. “We did a story six months ago about a woman who makes cakes for children with cancer. Another editor and I discussed it and she said, ‘do you want to put a call-out for people to give?’ The woman didn’t have a 501(c)(3), so I didn’t feel comfortable soliciting donations on her behalf. But it didn’t matter,” [executive editor Annemarie Conte] shares. “Our readers found her. One even wrote in and taped a $100 bill to her letter. Our readers are incredibly giving and want to find deserving places to give.”

To hear more about how to get published in this mag, including what not to pitch, read: How To Pitch: Woman’s Day.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

NY Post Reporter on How to Create a Successful Blog: ‘Consistency’

JozenCummings

Jozen Cummings likes to call himself a professional ‘date-maker’ and that’s an accurate description for his career as of late. Cummings is the dating reporter for the New York Post‘s Meet Market column, and he runs the blog ‘Until I Get Married,’ where he shares the ups and downs of bachelorhood.

Cummings, whose writing has appeared everywhere from Essence to The New York Times Magazine, had no dating-related clips to show for himself when he initially went in for the interview at the Post. But he did have his personal blog on the topic, which helped him land the gig.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Cummings talks about setting up blind dates, his writing process and how to cultivate a following on your blog:

Now that you’ve been kind of accidentally intentional with your blog’s success, what advice would you give up-and-coming bloggers to optimize their blog’s popularity? 

I think the most important thing is to find a schedule and be as consistent as possible with it because that’s the thing that people need in order to engage — consistency. It’s more important that you publish your post on the same day every week than it is for you to write five different times five days a week. Do it once a week for four weeks at the same time and then the fifth week, have a post ready, but don’t post. Give it a day. And I guarantee there will be somebody who you didn’t know was reading who will hit you up and say, “Yo, where’s my post?”

For more advice and what it’s like to be a dating reporter, read: So What Do You Do, Jozen Cummings, Blogger And Dating Columnist For The New York Post?

– Aneya Fernando

How to Get The Most Out of Your Expert Interview

Whether you’re new to the journalism trade or just introverted, interviewing can be a daunting task – especially when you’re on deadline. In the latest Mediabistro feature, veteran writers give tips on how you can get the most out of your interviews, and what tools to use in the process. Though we have all sorts of technology to help us nowadays with recording and transcribing, there are some skills that will always be necessary in the art of interviewing:

Don’t be afraid to ask for clarification. If your expert uses an unfamiliar term or draws an analogy that doesn’t make sense, ask her to expound. If you don’t understand something your expert says, your readership may not, either — and your job as a writer is often to boil down complicated or abstract ideas into practical information.

Freelance writer Rachel Heston-Davis admits she learned this after trial and error. She emphasizes the importance of asking an expert to reiterate because “you will not be able to figure something out from context later.” She adds that having misinformation in your article, or a lack of information, reflects poorly on both you as a writer and your interviewed expert. Getting clarification in an interview “really is better than the [expert] looking at your article and feeling like you didn’t understand what you’re writing about.”

For more on interviewing skills and tools, read Get the Most Out of Your Interview With an Expert.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

To Interns, With Love: How To Work It In the Newsroom

It’s a Thursday afternoon in June and that means there are media interns across the country staring at walls, possibly showing too much skin, and playing around with your CMS. Since we know you’re reading now, journalism students and digital hopefuls, here’s my advice to you. Of course, it should all be taken with the proverbial grain of salt.

1) I’ve only actually held one real, certified internship at a local cable news show. It was not as cool as some other internships that my classmates had — they were in more glamorous buildings with more glamorous names. Luckily, interning at a small, sort of uncool media company meant that I actually had tasks to perform, a producer to report to, and the fruits of my labor often ended up on the air.

And yet, there was still always about an hour and a half,  just after I knocked out all of my work and it had been approved, I asked for more work and there was none, and just before the cold open where I would run a teleprompter like a boss (it’s a shame this is not a marketable skill), during which there was nothing to do. I would fiddle with tabs on my browser like I was in a North Korean computer lab and try not to make too much noise as I popped the top of my Diet Coke can. It was excruciating.

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