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Posts Tagged ‘engagement’

Washington Post Invites Readers To Subscribe To Staff On Facebook

Today, Mark S. Luckie — the founder of 10,000 Words, and now full-time social media guy at WaPo – invited readers to subscribe to its staff on Facebook. He wrote:

Looking to connect with Washington Post reporters and writers on Facebook? You can now get updates from Post staffers on the social network using Facebook’s “Subscribe” feature.

The recently launched feature allows you to receive updates from Facebook users who have enabled the feature without having to friend them first. To get started, make sure you are logged in to your Facebook account and click the Subscribe button adjacent to any of the individuals listed below. You can also navigate to the profile of anyone who has enabled the feature and click the “Subscribe” button found at the top right-hand corner of the person’s profile.

The Post makes it easy to find and subscribe to its staff — the blog post contains a list of staff who have enabled the subscribe feature, and a one-click “Subscribe” button next to their names.   This isn’t an option to subscribe to a public journalist page, but, in most cases, the personal profile page of that individual.

Of course, staff members can still decide to hide some posts from subscribers by sharing those updates with only friends, or specific lists or groups using Facebook’s audience selector. If you want to create a similar post to publicize your staff, you can generate subscribe buttons at the Facebook Developers site by inputting the URL of the page and grabbing the embed code.

What Do Followers Really Want? Not An RSS Feed

While there’s plenty of debate about what journalists should post and to retweet on social networking sites, there’s not enough discussion about what’s not getting posted. Specifically, most of what’s debated is about what news organizations want to share — not what followers actually want to see.

I’m sure there are reams of data floating around corporate offices full of feedback from focus groups and online surveys about what readers want. Yet most news organization feeds are bastions of one-way discussion and self-promotion.

Heidi Moore: The point of being on Twitter is to talk to peopleWhile there’s certainly a place for sharing content on these networks, it’s not the end-all-be-all. In fact, it’s not all that useful. Twitter and Facebook aren’t RSS feeds, and they shouldn’t be used that way. They should be used to engage audiences, and to engage audiences requires more than a requisite run down of your top stories. Read more

Pro Tip: Use Facebook’s New Questions Feature To Increase Engagement

If you are not already using Facebook Questions on your news organization’s Facebook page, you are really missing out.

Formulating poll questions is simple, and there is high potential for a poll question to go viral, placing both the question and your news organization’s brand on the walls of many “strangers.” Every time someone votes on the question, their vote gets recorded to their wall, which will also display on the newsfeeds of all their friends.

Those friends also can vote on the question, which, in turn, will show all of their friends the question. They need not “like” your news organization’s Facebook page in order to vote. However, in my experience, I have noticed an increase in “likes” after a question is posted to a Facebook page.

Facebook users passionate about a particular topic asked can “follow” the topic and be notified about new votes. Like most things on Facebook, questions can be commented on. Write-in answers are also allowed.

It is a lot easier (and typically more engaging) for people to vote on a question than to share a link they first see posted to a Facebook page. For this reason, I believe using Facebook questions should be imperative for all news organizations.

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