GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Posts Tagged ‘Eric Wemple’

Every News Story On The Internet Right Now Could Be 300 Words Shorter

AP_logoOk, so while longwinded Upworthy-style headlines are in vogue right now, so should be tighter editing. Earlier this week, Erik Wemple reported on an AP memo announcing a move to start “policing” story length. Daily bylines digest stories should be around 300-500 words and top, ‘global’ stories should never exceed 700, unless it’s necessary and still ‘tightly edited.’ I’m all about it. Some reasons managing editor Brian Carovillano wants them shorter?

1) Good stuff is drowning in a ‘sea of bloated, mid level copy.’ I know we’re all supposed to be all about ‘longform,’ but it seems like everything I read these days is at least two paragraphs (or pages, if you’re The New Yorker) too long. One day when I have a free weekend, I’m going to compile my evidence, but for now it remains a hypothesis: I think a lot of us are writing too much to seem more serious and in-depth so as not to appear too beholden to the ‘clickiness’ of the Internet. Yes, we can do serious journalism on mobile and digital-first platforms. But it can also be concise. Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Twitter’s Reaction To The State of the Union In One Compelling Infographic

Last night, President Obama gave the 2012 State of the Union address, and Twitter users immediately took to the platform to livetweet their #SOTU reactions. Over at the Washington Post, Eric Wemple provides some interesting reasoning as to why Twitter is the perfect tool to complement live TV. His main argument is that Twitter is ideal for capturing the minutia–reaction shots, jokey asides–without interrupting the overall flow of the event. Twitter users seem to agree, considering the sheer amount of people tweeting about the event last night.

Twitter has put together an infographic to illustrate last night’s activity on the site, including this whopping number: 766,681 users tweeted between 9:05pm and 10:40pm with a State of the Union-related hashtag. Congress jumped in on the action, too: there were 548 total tweets from congressional members during the speech.

Check out the full infographic after the jump.

Read more