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Posts Tagged ‘ethics’

Has Time Inc. Gone Too Far With New Cover Ads?

Screen Shot 2014-05-28 at 1.52.21 PMLast week there was, understandably, some buzz about Time Inc.’s decision to sell small cover ads. The news, on the heels of Time Inc.’s split from Time Warner Cable, broke that a small Verizon ad (a line of text in the bottom corner of the cover, potentially right below a mailing label, reading “For best results use Verizon see P. 23″) would appear on the upcoming issue of Time and Sports Illustrated.

The addition of marketing messages to the front cover is in direct opposition to the American Society of Magazine Editors’ (ASME) very first editorial guideline, which states clearly:

1. Don’t Print Ads on Covers
The cover is the editor and publisher’s brand statement. Advertisements should not be printed directly on the cover or spine.

This procedure ensures that editorial integrity remains intact and isn’t influenced by advertisers. Over on one of our sister sites, FishBowlNY, Chris O’Shea was outspoken about the paradigm shift:

“Obviously this is just the beginning. Eventually magazine covers will look like NASCAR cars, completely covered in ads. It’ll be like a fun, sad game — try to figure out what magazine this is!” he wrote.

Read more

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Anthony Shadid Award Recognizes Ethical Journalism

Anthony Shadid, courtesy University of Wisconsin

Anthony Shadid, courtesy University of Wisconsin

New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid died in 2012 from a severe allergic reaction while crossing the Syrian border on assignment for the paper.

A highly accomplished journalist, Shadid had already won two Pulitzer Prizes for his courageous and insightful foreign correspondence.

As a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Shadid sat on the school’s center for journalism ethics advisory board and was a strong supporter of efforts to promote public interest journalism and to stimulate discussion about journalism ethics.

In recognition of Shadid’s contributions to the pursuit of ethics in journalism, the school’s center for journalism ethics recently announced a call for nominations for a new, national award: Read more

Plagiarism and Attribution Tests for Journalists: A Must or Not?

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If there’s anything journalists know, it’s how not to plagiarize in our writing. Right? Right?! Wrong, apparently.

Wednesday Jim Romenesko broke the news on his blog that Digital First Media (DFM) has been having some issues with their reporters failing to attribute sources correctly in their work and as a result, their leadership team is asking everyone to take a “plagiarism and attribution quiz.” In a memo from Steve Buttry to DFM staff members, Digital Transformation Editor Buttry wrote that there had been “too many plagiarism cases recently in DFM newsrooms” (read the full memo, first published by Romenesko, here).

On top of the five-question quiz, reporters will have to complete a webinar regarding Web journalism and ethics. In the staff note, Buttry cited DFM’s reputation, “integrity” and “standards” as reasons to encourage all DFM journalists to go through the quick training.

Read more

Gawker’s Crackstarter Campaign is Over

Gawker’s Rob Ford Crackstarter campaign is officially over. When it first started, we wondered here why readers should pay to see in the first place. Like all things drug related, the campaign took a nose-dive when the video became randomly unavailable.

The cash is now being divvied up, as promised, to Canadian charities that John Cook has deemed worthy. Apart from the ethics of making readers pay for source material, if you’re thinking about running a crowdfunding campaign for anything, you should remember to estimate fees into your goal:

 

The total take from Crackstarter was $201,199. Indiegogo, the service that hosted the campaign, withheld $8,047.96 in fees. PayPal, which processed the payments, withheld $8,368.43. That left the Crackstarter with a net take of $184,782.61, which has been held in a non-interest bearing account since PayPal released the money to us.

That’s over $16,000 that Indiegogo and PayPal pocketed jsut because Gawker readers are crazy enough to want to watch a mayor smoking crack. And they say there’s no money in journalism these days.

Image c/o Gawker

In Praise of New Media: Let Tabloid TV Off the Hook

Watching the back and forth of media critics turning on CNN is better than a tennis match. The cable network got in trouble last week for covering the Zimmerman trial and relegating the events in Egypt to a sidebar. Media critic Jay Rosen was taken to task by Jack Shafer in Reuters who praised CNN’s tabloid television, noting that we shouldn’t blame CNN for finally having a strategy, that tabloid television serves the networks ratings, and also stands in for civics lessons:

 To be fair, the best tabloid TV contains more nourishment than any burger and fries platter, even if it will always be déclassé… Most of what a layman needs to know about police investigations, police interrogations, witness rights, evidentiary standards, jury selection, and courtroom strategy can be found in Grace’s shriekings and those of her commentators. A week’s worth of her Zimmerman coverage probably contains as much civic education as any half-dozen Frontline documentaries on PBS.

 

I usually stand in Rosen’s corner when he takes journalists to task, but in the case of CNN, I’m leaning the other way. But not because I think tabloid television in any way serves the public. It’s more because I’m excited to watch cable news networks hang themselves. They don’t do breaking news very well anymore — watching the manhunt after the Boston Marathon bombings was painful — so let them play with ‘if it bleeds, it leads.” Yes, CNN used to be something better, maybe, but now it’s not. Read more

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