GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

Social Networks and Digital Publishing: Friday Link Round-Up

eulogyfortwitterAh, it’s Friday and finally nice out. Which is why I plan on catching up on all the good links and stories I had to breeze through during the work week. Somewhere outdoors, facing the sun, preferably with a morning coffee. Here are some social media themed links I’ve been thinking about this week; tweet us @10,000Words or comment with articles you think we should catch up on this weekend.

1) I saw that this conversation was going on, but couldn’t bring  myself to get buried in it. Until now. The Atlantic’s ‘Eulogy for Twitter‘ makes some interesting points, though I think media people tend to get caught up, as if Twitter has to be the same for everyone. Maybe it’s just not for journalists anymore, but that’s pretty ridiculous, too.  The point about Twitter a catalyst, like AOL was for email, is something to chew on alongside your Sunday bagel. If Twitter’s dying, someone tell the White House, who is obviously stressing way too much about it.

2) I only log into into LinkedIn when my train’s delayed and I’ve become bored with Twitter (well, now…). I notice that they’ve sent me  a bunch of email notifications,  go in to clean up the mess and see who viewed my profile, as if it were some freemium dating service. But I digress — turns out there are a lot of people like me, which is why this Quartz piece says that LinkedIn is still focusing on being a content site. But a newspaper?

3) I hate to toot our own horn, but this Angela Washeck post on Facebook newswire lays out its plans and asks some good questions. It’s made entirely possible with Storyful, which means, how is it better than Storyful or even a well curated Twitter newsfeed?

So what did we miss out on this week? What are your weekend reading plans?

Image credit: The Atlantic.

Facebook’s “Newswire” Is Made Possible By Storyful

fb-newswire_news11Facebook and publishers have a love-hate relationship, in general. Sometimes the social network is great for directing traffic back to publishers’ websites, while at the same time, Mark Zuckerberg and company are competing for some of the same ad dollars that pubs want.

This time around, Facebook wants to help journalists discover verified, newsworthy content to aid in their reporting.

April 24, Facebook’s Director of News and Global Media Partnerships Andy Mitchell announced FB Newswire, “a resource that will make it easier for journalists and newsrooms to find, share and embed newsworthy content from Facebook in the media they produce.”

They’re taking on this venture with Storyful, a social media news operation that is already quite useful for reporters breaking news in real-time. Storyful has a strong team in place that verifies social posts from Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other networks by geolocation and diligent sourcing, and then communicates the verified information to newsrooms via an API or a dashboard. Really, Storyful is doing all the work here, but this is a wise step for Facebook, which clearly wants to appeal to media organizations.

Read more

The Boston Globe Launches Free Site Covering Startups, Innovation in Boston

BetaBoston.com is a new, free site launched by the venerable Boston Globe to specifically cover the Boston tech sector encompassing everything from new ideas and ventures to the people who help shape the city’s future, culture and beyond.

beta boston post pic“Boston’s wealth of consumer technology, life sciences and bioscience companies is reshaping the economy and culture, locally and globally,” said Boston Globe editor Brian McGrory. “We will cover, in-depth, not only the technologies themselves, but the broader social impact of those technologies.” Read more

The Hottest Social Network These Days? Not Facebook — But It’s Owned By Them

Facebook remains the undisputed king of social networks. If you’re sharing your stories or looking for sources, your time is well spent there.

But if you want to keep up and catch up with your audience, you can’t be only there, especially as the web moves to an ever more-visually driven medium. (And no, “But I’m on Twitter, too” isn’t enough these days.)

A study out this month finds that the clear winner in growth is another Facebook-acquired property is gaining on its photo-sharing corporate cousin: Instagram. According to research firm GlobalWebIndex, whose quarterly social summary (for Q4 2013) released this month pegs Instagram as the fastest growing — by a long shot — social network.

According to their survey, Instagram grew a whopping 23% in active usage in the fourth quarter of 2013. That same period saw a 3% decrease in Facebook’s usage, as well as in YouTube. To be fair, Facebook is still the most trafficked network, and with far more users already signed on it has less room to grow, but other budding social networks are gaining on it. Read more

The State of the Digital News Publishing Industry, According to the Internet

typefaceThere must be something in the air, maybe the end of a crazy year, that’s making writers introspective. In the past week alone, there have been some very good analyses of the state of the digital publishing . Since it’s cold outside (unless you live in a place where it’s not cold outside, and in that case, stop gloating) and you need some good reads for hibernation, here are five pieces that, I think, aptly explain the industry right now and help further the conversation.

“Against ‘Long Form’ Journalism,” James Bennett

Everybody in the room, put your hands together for Mr. Bennett. It’s not that he’s against expansive reporting, but the way the terminology is thrown around by publications. He asks:

“Is this just a fad, maybe even a fraud? Cynics would say that publishing a few big feature stories is a shortcut to respectability, and they’d be correct. But realists, I’m happy to say, would comment further that such features work: They draw in a lot of readers.”

Recently, I have find myself tapping out around page 3 or 4 of a feature article. By placing value on “long” we stop focusing on “interesting.” Let’s find another phrase, Bennet suggests, even if it proves tough;

Length is hardly the quality that most meaningfully classifies these stories. Yet there’s a real conundrum here: If long-form doesn’t fit, what term is elastic enough to encompass the varied journalism it has come to represent, from narrative to essay, profile to criticism? And how do you account for the blurring of boundaries as work from the digital realm energizes and reshapes traditional forms of journalism?

“Growing Obsession With Viral Content Exposes the Weakness of Most Digital Media,” Mathew Ingram

good post about Gawker’s Neetzan Zimmerman, although I wondered about this: “He posts only about a dozen items a day” http://t.co/rBfMIQvbxI

— Mathew Ingram (@mathewi) December 2, 2013

Let’s put aside the fact that that headline is really long and plays into some viral trends itself. After the Wall Street Journal’s profile on Neetzan Zimmerman, Ingram was irked by how many times a day the subject posted, and posits that focusing on viral content as a growth strategy, while it works for some, may not be a great idea. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket sort of thing:

But even if the content itself continues to work — in the sense that people will always want to share photos of otters holding hands or cats that look like Franklin Delano Roosevelt — the value of those millions of pageviews is continuing to drop. That’s not just because there are more and more sites doing it, but because the value of incremental pageviews is sinking inexorably towards zero. Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>