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Posts Tagged ‘future of journalism’

SXSWi Day 3: Journalism Can Make For Great Business, Says The Atlantic‘s Scott Havens

IAP22928The “future of journalism” topic has almost become trite in journalism circles, but for The Atlantic‘s President M. Scott Havens, thoughtful discussions and observations on the media landscape, both present and future, make the difference between being in the red and black.

At his SXSW talk, “Can Great Journalism Make for Great Business?” Havens, who will begin his post as Senior Vice President, Digital at Time Inc. March 31, explained how he helped propel a struggling then-Atlantic Monthly back to relevancy and progressiveness in the biz. A few of his “core beliefs” on producing and financially sustaining digital journalism are:

Magazines are here to stay

Sure, the definition of magazines is increasingly open for interpretation, but Havens says they’re not going anywhere. Readers are seeking stories with depth, analysis and craft, unlike so much of the content that permeates the web. “There’s something special about a well-researched magazine article,” he said. It’s fair to assume that print magazines won’t last (other than giants like TIME, Harper’s, The New Yorker, etc.) unless publishers can keep making profits from them. In The Atlantic’s experience, “Print advertising is actually sorta stable,” he said.

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Watch Industry Pros Discuss the Future of Digital Longform Friday

logoComing up Friday, Dec. 6, several heavy hitters in the world of longform digital publishing will make appearances at Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism to discuss the future of longer narratives online. Interested journalists can also watch a livestream of the event.

David Remnick of The New Yorker is on the bill at Friday’s one-day conference “The Future of Digital Longform” in Manhattan, as well as professionals from nonprofit investigative journalism effort ProPublica, science journalism venture Matter, the crowdfunded Narratively, Longform and The Atavist.

The event was planned for a couple reasons: 1) We’re smack dab in the middle of a really interesting movement in digital storytelling. Some call it a renaissance, even, and it’s clear that a new phenomenon has surfaced; as the Tow Center notes, narratives are being weaved together through multimedia, moving comics and powerful data instead of being one-dimensional. And, 2) Tow Center fellow Anna Hiatt, also of The Big Roundtable, which I’ve written about for the blog), is finished with her research about digital longform journalism, which is part of an ongoing look at the definitions and challenges of longer online news.

Over the course of the day, several important questions like “Just because we can design another “Snow Fall,” should we?” and, considering the fairly recent influx of startups for digital storytelling, the toughest question — “How do we pay writers?” — will be posed and pondered.

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New Report Indicates Growth Of Philanthropy In The Media

knightfdnAccording to a new report out of the Knight Foundation, media-related grantmaking grew at almost four times the rate of domestic giving between 2009 and 2011, with 1.86 billion being awarded. The report, Growth in Foundation Support for Media in the United States, is a collaboration between the Foundation Center, Media Impact Funders and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. It is the most comprehensive view of philanthropy’s role in the media funding landscape in years.

The numbers are surprising at times. Read more

An Optimistic Look at the Future of Journalism in George Brock’s ‘Out of Print’

gb1As the holiday season approaches, you might find yourself looking for reading material to give as a gift, or curl up with on some possible days off (I like to think we get time off. Just roll with it). A good choice would be Out of Print, part textbook, part commentary, by George Brock, head of City University’s graduate school of journalism in London, as well as ex-journo for the Times and Observer.

It’s an unsentimental look at the fall of the “golden age” of newspapers as much as it is an optimistic take on the future of the news business. Read more

The Old Grey Lady: The Times Needs to Get Over ‘Snow Fall’

Like most people, I have a fear of getting really old. You know how sometimes you see an old, grey lady in the supermarket grumbling about the price of milk and scowling at the clerk who tries to help her? I don’t want to be her one day. Other times, I see a woman of the same, grey age on the street with a cooler handbag than I currently do, tweeting her way down 6th Avenue with friend and think, ‘there you go! That’s how I’m going to be!’

The New York Times is both of these grey ladies, all of the time. 

By asking Scrollkit to take down their replica and reference to ‘Snow Fall,’ the Times looks a little cranky. I’m no Lawrence Lessig, but like Cody Brown, I can see how his video ‘could be’ fair use. Asking him to cease and desist using any mention of the Times on their site? That’s a little draconian. But what do I know. 

In any case, the New York Times has been, and still is, a benchmark of decent journalism and decent survival rates online. But it’s going to have to play nice. 

Cool Grey Lady: Experimentation Read more

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