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Posts Tagged ‘jay rosen’

Do We Need Open Interviews?

redcurtainI realize that I may have harped a bit on Vox.com recently, but that’s because it’s new and doing work worth noticing. This week, via a tweet from Jay Rosen, I noticed that they had a toggle feature on an article. You can read the story and then toggle over to see where the pull quotes came from.

It’s a cool feature and one that I think many journo professors and media navel gazers think is necessary. We used to edit because we were limited to column inches. You can fit everything and anything on your website — so why not go for full disclosure? I get it. Open interviews are good for transparency, add value and all of that.

But is everything really fit to print? Read more

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Watch the 15th International Symposium on Online Journalism Live

2014isojdateThere are few occasions when the world’s greatest minds in journalism gather to discuss, brainstorm and learn with and from each other, and the annual International Symposium on Online Journalism (ISOJ) is certainly one of those occasions.

The 15th iteration of the meeting is this upcoming weekend, April 4-5 at the University of Texas-Austin’s Blanton Museum of Art, and the ISOJ schedule promises some great information and top speakers from all over the world including media execs, writers and academics.

But don’t worry if you can’t make it to the Lone Star State for ISOJ (some of you just returned from SXSW 2014, right?). You can tune in to the event’s livestream here on Friday and Saturday, where the ISOJ will be broadcast in English and Spanish. Read more

What’s In A Name? For New Media Companies, It’s Everything

opendictionaryThis week, First Look Media launched their inaugural “digital magazine” The Intercept. As Matthew Ingram points out here, it’s a term that doesn’t quite fit what they’re aiming to do. It’s not a targeted vertical on a larger site, it’s not a niche blog, it’s something else, something new

Jay Rosen, an advisor to First Look, has classified The Intercept, along with Re/Code or Grantland, under “the personal franchise model.” He writes:

By “personal franchise” I mean something more: a central figure or personality has given birth to a newsroom, a larger operation. But the larger operation still feels like an individual’s site.

In practice, this means that First Look’s design, according to Rosen’s post on the company:

…accepts and incorporates the personal franchise style, treating it as no threat to the editorial ambitions that First Look has for itself. In fact, the hope is to attract others who can launch sites like The Intercept, and to offer a common core of services — data skills, design help, good publishing tools, strong legal advice, marketing muscle — that the founders will need to succeed…Under this model, the diverse paths that such sites may take are not a “distraction” from the core business or a subtraction from the editorial brand but a vital part of both.

What I find exciting is not just that there are so many examples of this personal franchise model, but that so many founders are completely rethinking how we produce, distribute, and consume journalism. Think about Ezra Klein under Vox Media with Project X: they’re thinking about doing something so differently, it doesn’t even have a name yet.

I think the culture demands that we describe our ventures in an ‘elevator pitch,’ or worse, 140 characters or less. But maybe that doesn’t have to be the case. Whether you call it a magazine or a blog, it doesn’t change the editorial mission behind The Intercept, or saying that Project X is a “news site/encyclopedia” doesn’t make it less of an undertaking.

What’s more important — defining the shift in business models or focusing on the shift? What do you think about the term ‘digital magazine?’

Get Your Foot Out Of Your Mouth

twitter logoIt’s amazing that it’s almost 2014 and people are still getting fired for saying horrible, no good things on social media. Haven’t we learned that what you say can and will get you in trouble?

Whether it’s Duck Dynasty’s patriach or IAC’s “accidental racist” Justine Sacco, people still aren’t learning that words have consequences. Over at On the Media’s TLDR Blog, PJ Vogt points out that Sacco, for example, had a long history of making bad jokes, and it’s surprising that she hadn’t come to the internet’s attention before. I agree. And what’s interesting isn’t that she hadn’t been in trouble before, or that shows and jobs can be lost, but that some people are still outraged or confused as to why media companies — or any company, for that matter — can take action against you for your words.

Be careful what you tweet, reporters. What might get a smirk or a laugh in the newsroom is destined to be spread around the internet if it rubs someone the wrong way. Quarrels among copy editors shouldn’t be taken to Twitter. You don’t have to be a bigot or a jerk, either. An unpopular opinion with a link to a story could do it, too.

I think Jay Rosen put it best:

 

The ‘Circus’ of Fashion Journalism and Niche Media

Whether or not you live in New York City, you are bound to be bombarded with fashion on some homepage this week, as #NYFW kicks off a month-long season of shows.

Like in general news publishing, the niche, elite world of fashion journalism has undergone some serious changes in the digital landscape. And it’s anxiety ridden. This past spring, Garage Magazine produced a short, 10 minute, video called “Take My Picture” anchored by the notorious fashion journo Tim Blanks. The piece examines the rise of the fashion blogger and “street style” photographers. It’s the same anxiety news hounds have about citizen journalists, but the elitism is ten fold. It’s fashion, after all.

Even the New York Times noted this week that the state of the fashion industry — which relies on fashion media as much as fabric — is reaching circus levels. Industry standards like Women’s Wear Daily, Harper’s Bazaar, W, and of course, Vogue are still kings of fashion content, but ‘good’ fashion blogs — the Andrew Sullivans, if you will — of fashion media, like Natalie Joos’ Tales of Endearment and Man Repeller are just as important sources for fashion news and features. But again, the idea of ‘good’ journalism is problematic.

Media commenter Jay Rosen wrote this month in CJR that journalism is defined by ‘awayness,’ as in “I was there, you weren’t, let me tell you about it.” In that sense, the Tumblr-fication of fashion media and street style is a good thing. The more the merrier. But it’s an interesting problem. In “Take My Picture,” Blanks seems to suggest that arming civilians with cameras and free blogging sites is bad for culture, in general. It cheapens the niche. It’s the same worry the general news publishing world has about Twitter and listicles.

I wonder what sports writers would feel about the locker rooms being opened up to just anyone? Or what political writers would say if the White House press briefings were open town halls that any blogger could walk into? 

 

Image via Mashable

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