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Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

10,000 Words Founder Mark S. Luckie to Join Twitter

Congratulations are in order for 10,000 Words founder Mark S. Luckie who will be leaving The Washington Post to join Twitter as its new creative content manager for journalism.

“To say I’m thrilled is an understatement. I’ll be working to transform the way journalists report the news and connect with their audiences and really maximizing my creative skills,” Luckie posted on his Facebook page.

Luckie announced his new job on Tuesday. He later tweeted that his new role, which will be based in New York City, will include coming up with “creative ways journalists use the platform, increase engagement and elevate Twitter use in newsrooms.”

Luckie, currently a social media editor at The Washington Post, started there in October 2010. While at the WaPo, Luckie has been in charge of identifying and implementing different types of social media strategies. He helped train others at the news organization in social media best practices. He was also part of a team nominated for a 2012 Pulitzer Prize for local news reporting.

So why the switch from a more traditional newsroom to Twitter? Read more

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5 Things Your Online Journalism Portfolio Should Include

Recently, we covered five free sites to help journalists build an online portfolio here at 10,000 Words. The list included a good starting place with the following sites: WordPress, Cuttings.me, Pressfolios, Flavors.me and About.me.

So now you know where to build, but what do you include? This “what” is often the difference between creating an online portfolio and wanting to create one, but not having the initiative to figure out what it should be. Taking time to form a rough sketch of what you hope to accomplish and how you want to display it helps immensely in deciding which of those portfolio platforms works best for you and how much work you want to do to build and maintain it over time.

What does belong on your online portfolio? Joe Grimm of Ask The Recruiter posed this question to Marc Samson, co-founder of Pressfolios, recently in an online chat. From their discussion and my own experience, here are five things your online portfolio should include:
Read more

Editors With Multimedia Skills More Likely To Be Promoted

If you’re a regular 10,000 Words reader, you know that multimedia skills can do wonders for your journalism career. Not only can you use your Twitter savvy to land a social media job, but if you can hip your bosses to the benefits of infographics or prove that page views increase with slideshows, you could get bumped up the masthead.

Marie Claire features director Lea Goldman didn’t go to J-school or take any workshops to learn how to create content for the iPad, for example. She hit the ground running.

“I am a big believer in just getting out there and doing. It’s thinking, ‘Oh, instead of an article, maybe we should do an interactive graphic or maybe a video would be great here.’ You really have to be willing to do more than just write and edit. If that’s all you’re interested in,” she added, “you’re probably in the wrong business.”

To find out how other magazine veterans got promoted, read How To Become an Editor-in-Chief.

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This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

 

The New York Times Asks Readers “Being a Reporter Is the ______ Job in the World?”

In case you missed the news, being a reporter is the fifth worst job of 2012, according to a CareerCast.com survey.

That’s right. Being a taxi driver, a maid, a dishwasher, or a janitor all ranked higher than being a newspaper reporter. (Here’s the full list, as published on The Wall Street Journal website.)

Now, over on The New York TimesMedia Decoder blog, David Carr is fighting back. Well, sort of. He’s at least giving reporters a chance to voice their opinion.  Read more

News Nerd Jobs: A Site For Submitting And Finding Journalism-Programmer Gigs

It’s a simple site, but it has huge value: News Nerd Jobs.

For those who are seeking or hiring programmer-journalists, the site contains a simple list — in the form of a public Google spreadsheet — of various developer jobs in newsrooms across the country. From the site’s description:

The news business needs people who can code in the public interest and build the digital news products of tomorrow. If you can code, there’s a job for you. Some of the top media companies in the United States are hiring developers right now.

I’d argue that this platform is potentially more effective than a huge database like Monster.com because it’s specifically tailored to coding jobs in journalism. Sure, you can filter big databases down to the kinds of keywords you want, but this site is populated directly by people in newsrooms who are looking for the same kinds of people: journalists who can code. It also helps that, because the site was started by Matt Waite, the network of potential applicants is top notch.

Want to add a listing? Just add a row to the Google Doc.

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