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Posts Tagged ‘magazine editors’

Land Up to $2 Per Word at Bicycling

Bicycling, the world’s largest cycling magazine, is looking for writers who can cover the hobby from new and fresh perspectives. “There has to be a bigger story besides the fact that you rode someplace cool,” said senior editor Emily Furia.

Bicycling tries to appeal to the biking community as whole, as opposed to other cycling publications that focus on specific subcultures. And, with half of the content in the mag provided by freelancers, these editors are more than willing to take on new scribes who lack experience or whose ideas need polishing. “In the case of freelance pitches, we will typically work with the writer to refine the story angle and format,” said Furia.

Get all the details and editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: Bicycling.

Nicholas Braun

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Journos With Strong Researching Skills Wanted at Cure

With almost half of its content provided by freelancers, Cure is accepting all pitches related to the research and treatment of cancer. The magazine is published quarterly and distributed freely to cancer patients and healthcare professionals.

So, what makes a successful pitch for Cure? Editors say they look for  ideas based on emerging research, commentary on current practices, or personal experience. Featured freelancers have also written about topics that are relevant to readers throughout the country, such as coping with the treatment process or advice on finding the appropriate doctor.

For more, read How to Pitch: Cure [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Nicholas Braun

ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Jane Pratt to Magazine Editors: Kill the ‘Magazine Speak’

Jane PrattAfter founding Sassy and Jane, Jane Pratt launched xojane.com in 2011 so she could speak frankly to female audiences, a voice that she says was sorely missing from print pubs.

“It still amazes me that a lot of women’s magazines in particular will use this magazine speak, this terminology.” Pratt told Mediabistro in the latest installment of So What Do You Do?. “Like, instead of saying ‘your hair,’ they’ll say ‘your mane’ or ‘your tresses.’ And I always feel like if someone says ‘your lackluster tresses’ instead of ‘your dirty hair,’ you feel like they’re not telling you the whole truth. I feel like that makes you as a reader say, ‘Well, if they’re lying to me about that, what else are they lying to me about?’

For more, read So What Do You Do, Jane Pratt, Editor-in-Chief of xojane.com?

Nicholas Braun

Smart Pitches Lead to Assignments in Portland

“With a bold design, eye-catching photography and an editorial voice that’s at once witty and in-the-know, Portland Monthly is our city’s indispensable news, culture and lifestyle magazine,” said managing editor Rachel Ritchie. Every month, the pub delivers a mix of in-depth news stories, provocative essays and essential guides to the best of Portland.

Ritchie said she is always accepting pitches and looking to work with freelancers on intriguing stories in various departments. What’s the secret for getting in with this pub? Ideas that are relevant, well-researched, articulated well and that demonstrate a familiarity with the magazine’s voice and mission. Once a newbie has proven himself, however, editors are more than happy to farm out stories to freelancers whom they’ve developed a strong relationship with.

For more, read How To Pitch: Portland Monthly. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

MIT Technology Review Wants Your Ideas

Unlike most pubs that are cutting down on long-form stories and giving less resources to in-depth reporting, MIT Technology Review remains deeply invested in giving journos the time and space to investigate a bold idea. Editors at the mag are looking to add to their stable of freelancers who generate 75-80 percent of the content in the feature well and reviews sections.

“I would hate to think of a freelancer assuming, ‘Oh, they wouldn’t want that because it’s going to be such a major project to go report,’” said deputy editor Brian Bergstein. Au contraire: With a bimonthly publishing schedule and a budget for deeply reported pieces, that’s exactly what editors want to hear, even if it’ll take four months to investigate. “We want to have the kind of things readers are only going to get here,” he said.

For more info, read How To Pitch: MIT Technology Review. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

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