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Posts Tagged ‘mobile’

Patch Unveils A New Site, Focused on Social and Mobile

Patch.com, AOL’s hyperlocal news experiment, is rolling out a new site today. In true new media fashion, the company designed the mobile site first, and the new format places heavy emphasis on social elements.

I got a preview of it on Friday from co-founder and CEO Jon Brod, chief content officer Rachel Feddersen and creative director Abel Lenz, who enthusiastically introduced the site as a shift from the soap-box model to a town square model. “This is a platform for communities to better organize day to day life,” said Feddersen, “we’re about making lives in towns better.”

So what’s different about the new Patch? According to Brod, it’s “the marriage of Journalism with a big J and the social elements of a community platform.” Read more

Knight News Challenge On Mobile Now Accepting Apps

Last week, we discussed 5 statistics that make mobile platforms worth paying attention to for journalists.

Now, the application process is finally open for the third and final round of the Knight News Challenge, this time focused on mobile. That makes it time to put your talent where the future is, or at least put yourself and your mobile idea out there for a share of the $5 million prize money. That’s free money to make your idea happen.

Remember, the purpose of these challenges — previously this year they focused around the themes of Data and Networks — is to encourage innovation in the news gathering and reporting business. How could your phone or tablet make that happen? How would you make the revenue part of that awesome idea work? Those are a few of the questions to address in the application. But really, the application is easy — just like the best mobile apps should be — and consists of just eight questions about your idea, how much it would cost, what’s already done and who you are/who you know who’ll help you succeed.

The application process opened today, Aug. 29, and runs through Sept. 10. Sounds like a good use of the Labor Day weekend (in the U.S. at least this is a holiday, but the News Challenge is open to anyone, anywhere). For more background, read the FAQ.

You can follow along on the ideas submitted so far on the News Challenge Tumblr. That’s also where the application form is. For more background, read about this challenge here.

Winners will be announced in early 2013. The winners from the second round, on Data, are expected to be named in mid-September.

Good luck!

5 Mobile Stats Worth Mentioning to Journalists

 

Shortly after recently announcing the theme of  this year’s third News Challenge installment  – “mobile” — the Knight Foundation tweeted an impressive stat backing up reasoning for its choice: there are 6 billion mobile devices worldwide.

Billion. With a “B.”

Read more

PEW Study Asks Whether Facebook Would Buy The Washington Post

The big struggle facing this era of journalism is how to keep it profitable online. Tech companies have figured it out, though — according to the PEW Research Center, five technology companies in 2011 accounted for 68 percent of all online ad revenue, not including Amazon and Apple , whose profits come mostly from downloads and devices. So how can newspapers break into the online ad revenue market?

Could we be headed to a world where Facebook buys a legacy media company like The Washington Post? It’s a question pondered in a study from PEW’s State of the Media report, which says that Facebook is expected to account for one out of every five digital display ads sold by 2015.

Examples of these kinds of partnerships are already popping up, the study says, citing the following relationships:

  1. YouTube is funding Reuters to produce original news shows.
  2. Yahoo signed a content partnership with ABC News for video content.
  3. AOL purchased The Huffington Post.
  4. Facebook, with launch of the social reader, has already formed partnerships with The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian.
  5. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes purchased the 98-year-old New Republic magazine

Source: stateofthemedia.org | Via: The Wrap

That said, the study also found that while Facebook and Twitter dominate the intersection of social sharing and news, social media are not yet a strong driver to news. The study found that 9 percent of digital news consumers “very often” follow news recommendations from social media, while more than a third of all consumers go directly to various news sites and apps.  A majority of survey-takers, 56 percent, said that while they often find news on Facebook, it’s usually big enough news that they would have found it elsewhere — a hint that maybe Facebook isn’t vital to the discovery of news.

Readers are also growing increasingly aware of privacy issues online, which could make a hypothetical Facebook-Washington Post acquisition even trickier. According to the PEW study, “roughly two-thirds of the Internet population is uneasy with targeted advertising and search engines tracking their behavior.” This is at the heart of what Facebook does.

What do you think — could you see a future where WaPo is owned by a tech company like Facebook?  Read other key findings and major trends from the PEW report →

Register Today for Poynter’s “Develop a Smarter Mobile Strategy” Workshop

One thing that I’ve been diligent in talking about here at 10,000 Words is creating a mobile presence. By 2014, mobile Internet is poised to take over desktop Internet usage, so the time to start strategizing is now. But with the dizzying array develop other Internet-connected devices, what’s the best way to begin this process? As I’ve stated before, the work of creating a mobile presence is less about aggregating current content and more about developing an information workflow. Luckily, the Poynter Institute has you covered with their latest workshop: Developing a Smarter Mobile Strategy.

The workshop will take place from March 28, 2012 – March 30, 2012. Here is some information about the workshop from Poynter:

Even if you’ve got some mobile products under your belt, we’ll help you learn to develop mobile news content and revenue strategies. You’ll gain insight into improving the working relationship with vendors and better ways to use your mobile metrics. We’ll help you sort through the issues in creating smart phone and tablet apps vs. using the mobile Web.

Knowledge about revenue strategies around mobile content is extremely important. According to Gartner, a leading IT research and advisory firm, worldwide mobile advertising revenue was forecasted to reach $3.3 billion in 2011 and $20.6 billion by 2015. “Mobile advertising is now recognized as an opportunity for brands, advertisers and publishers to engage consumers in a targeted and contextual manner, improving returns,” said Stephanie Baghdassarian, research director at Gartner. With HTML5 video on the rise, this will present a new avenue for organizations to approach advertising on mobile devices.

You’ll also learn these topics from Poynter during the workshop:

  • A process for developing and improving your mobile strategy
  • The latest information on mobile audiences
  • How to manage mobile product development
  • How to make the most of your mobile efforts in spite of fast-changing technology
  • The basics of mobile usability
  • Best practices in vendor relationships

Sessions will be led by Poynter faculty members Regina McCombs, Sara Quinn, and Kelly McBride, and will include research sessions with Robert McCann, Jr., of the Nielsen Company, David Butler of The New York Times Regional Group, and Janel Jacobs of the Orlando Sentinel and the Sun Sentinel.

For more information about this exciting and informative workshop, visit the workshop page. All applications for the workshop are due by February 24, 2012.

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